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Replacing Box Squats?

hey for all the guys who box squat what would you do to replace it. I have never box squatted only regular box squats but in the past month I have only front squatted due to back pain. Right now spinal compression of any kind hurts my back so what would you guys do to replace it at best. Front squat box squats?

you could load up a dipping belt and standing on two benches simply squat. Im sure I read it in a post on this site a while back

[quote]HitEmHard wrote:
you could load up a dipping belt and standing on two benches simply squat. Im sure I read it in a post on this site a while back[/quote]

ehh that might be a pain

If spinal compression of any kind hurts, don’t do any sort of loaded barbell squat, get it looked at. I don’t want to frighten you, but that’s not a good symptom.

A front squat off a box is almost pointless. A box squat trains you to sit back properly, and drive with the posterior chain correctly. Front squats emphasise the quads.

If front squats hurt your back less my guess it is just because the loading is less. How do you go with a back squat of the same loading as a front squat?

Some unloaded and possibly safer alternatives for you (until your back is better) are back extensions (don’t hyper-extend) and, if you are very lucky and go to a gym with this sort of stuff, GHRs and Reverse Hypers.

[quote]DragnCarry wrote:
If spinal compression of any kind hurts, don’t do any sort of loaded barbell squat, get it looked at. I don’t want to frighten you, but that’s not a good symptom.

A front squat off a box is almost pointless. A box squat trains you to sit back properly, and drive with the posterior chain correctly. Front squats emphasise the quads.

If front squats hurt your back less my guess it is just because the loading is less. How do you go with a back squat of the same loading as a front squat?

Some unloaded and possibly safer alternatives for you (until your back is better) are back extensions (don’t hyper-extend) and, if you are very lucky and go to a gym with this sort of stuff, GHRs and Reverse Hypers.[/quote]

well i cant cause i have no health insurance, yea my back was hurt a while ago and preety much only hurts when I put squats back into the program

HitmeHard:
you could load up a dipping belt and standing on two benches simply squat. Im sure I read it in a post on this site a while back.

AR:
I agree this can work well but the other guy is also right, it is a pain.
There is a machine that Louie Simmons uses to get the weight off the westside guys backs for a portion of the year. Its similar to what you suggested above. Make sure you are not trying this alone though, and you wont be able to use as much weight.

My first thought is doing single leg box squats. Varying the height of the box can change the difficulty and also the weigt (if any at all) will put much less pressure on your spine.

I agree to find a specialist, ask around for a good Orthropedic doc, and go. He/she might refer you to someone else but its worth it to check. The last thing you want is a screwed up back the rest of your life.
(a good Physical Therapist is many times often better, but there are some stupid ass PT’s out there also)

You might also try kettlebells if your gym has them. Do some research.

I used to have a bad back also but I 1) got my muscles activating correctly particularly glutes, 2) figured out stomach hollowing, 3) took care of some injuries with a great sports med/ART/Chiropratic guy, 4) Started using foam rollers, 5) got rid of any exercises where Im moving at the lumbar spine, like sit-ups and 6) is more like a side note but I also started incorporating kettlebells and more med ball stuff into my workouts.

Reverse hypers are a good change up to the old back extensions also. I know this got mentioned above, but I like it that much, especially for a problem with the spine.

I also see alot of people who are trying to make their abs stronger to help their backs and they are doing more harm than good because they are increasing the mobility at the lumbar spine. I try to help them gain mobility in their hips. Opening up the anterior (loosening the hip flexors) and posterior (adding movement and strength to the glutes). This helps almost 100% of the people I see.

As far as ab exercises I stay with static and isometric types. Like planks and/or dead bugs for instance.

Check out www.robertsontrainingsystems.com
and
www.ericcressey.com

Those two have good info out there on this subject.

Good luck, hope this helps.

I encourage anyone to respond even if you disagree. Thanks

Leg press?

[quote]skidmark wrote:
Leg press?[/quote]

If you have to resort to a leg press, why not. You can do unilateral stuff on it too.

leg presses are not nearly as beneficial though. Not even close.

I tend to throw leg presses in with smith machines. They’re good for hanging stuff on and thats about i

Well I had to say “leg press” - you covered everything else.

You must read or something.

I use leg press, but it’s not kind to my back. Squatting properly seems to be better, I go into flexion with leg press.

[quote]crod266 wrote:
well i cant cause i have no health insurance, yea my back was hurt a while ago and preety much only hurts when I put squats back into the program[/quote]

Then don’t squat. Think long term.

[quote]crod266 wrote:
HitEmHard wrote:
you could load up a dipping belt and standing on two benches simply squat. Im sure I read it in a post on this site a while back

ehh that might be a pain[/quote]

why is this a pain? Good grief. I do these all the time. Takes no more time to set up than loading a barbell. and the leg press is a horrible option for someone with back/spine pain.

[quote]robo1 wrote:
crod266 wrote:
HitEmHard wrote:
you could load up a dipping belt and standing on two benches simply squat. Im sure I read it in a post on this site a while back

ehh that might be a pain

why is this a pain? Good grief. I do these all the time. Takes no more time to set up than loading a barbell. and the leg press is a horrible option for someone with back/spine pain.[/quote]

Works okay for me, though I favor the other option mentioned at the top of this post.

I cant imagine cutting squats out of a program. They are just too beneficial. Even if only trying to train the upper body, squats would still improve gains.

I cant emphasize single leg squats enough. Unilateral movements in general are great. It could be part of your problem that you are putting to much load with out proper stability.

I know that was my problem. I played football in college and the SC coach couldnt figure out wihy my back hurt and my numbers weren’t going up.
I went to another strength coach during the summer, started using med balls, single leg squats and other unilateral work along with my regular squats and cleans. This made all the difference in the world. He also taught me stomach hollowing which makes a HUGE difference.

If you dont have health insurance email some good strength coaches around the nation. Eric Cressey is one that comes to mind. His email is right on his website.

Also Make some new friends. Especially educated ones, like physical thereapists.
Walk in tell them you want to shadow them for a few hours once a week, tell them you want to learn, which is what you’re looking to do anyway. Just leech off of their knowledge, as much as you can get. Try and help out around the place, picking up stuff or whatever and this will make them like you more. People love feeling smart also, so ask lots of questions.
After a 2-3 weeks you have an excellent resource to refer to.

The book Combat Core by Jimmy Smith would most likely be a good read for you. Maybe you already have it. I think it’d be a good book for anyone to read.

Stuart McGill is a guy who is extremely extremely knowledgeable about the spine. He’s probably forgot more than Ive ever learned. But check out some of his books. They would be great.

Did Anyone mention a zercher? thats another option

[quote]adam.rees wrote:
He also taught me stomach hollowing which makes a HUGE difference.

Stuart McGill is a guy who is extremely extremely knowledgeable about the spine.
[/quote]

Sorry to hijack this thread, but just fyi, McGill is advising against stomach hollowing in preference of contracting and pressing out (intra-abdominal pressure).

That is what I meant by stomach hollowing. Pushing the stomach out and contracting the abs (hollowing the stomach). As if someone is going to punch you in the stomach.

Pulling in the abs is not good for your core. Its not functional, realistic, or healthy, and its not going to do anything to push up your total.

One way to figure this out is to put a belt on but leave it a little loose so you have to push your stomach out to keep it up. Practice that a few times. It will probably help alot.

Sorry I may have miss spoken above. I’ll be thorough in the future. Thanks for calling it out though.