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Replace "Dumbell Shoulder Press" with "Overhead Barbell Press"?

#1

I can do 60lb dumbells for seated dumbell shoulder press but I notice on this exercise the heavier the weight becomes, the harder it is to set in form before 1st rep. This is why I sometimes see a spotter put it in form for the lifter while he’s seated.

Instead of doing 3 sets of 6-10 reps seated dumbell shoulder press, why not just do 3 sets of 6-10 reps of standing overheard shoulder press? Its a compound exercise so in my opinion it would be better. I already do it on monday I wanna replace on my friday workout for dumbell seated press.

The only resason it because its harder to lift those dumbells as it gets heavier lol. However one thing i noticed is that dumbell version of anything is going to be hearder than the acually barbell version of it. For example dumbell bench press uses lower combined dumbell weight than someone doing barbell bench press.

What would be the equivalent of 60lb dumbells on the overhead standing press? I can do 135x4 for 3 sets monday.

#2

Close enough. If you can do bb OHP safely long term then go ahead.

Easiest way to find an appropriate working weight to start off with would be trial and error. Consider like you said that usually BB>DB, Seated>Standing, Partial ROM > Full ROM.

I’d recommend starting on the lighter side of things to get used to the new movement because it’s close but slightly different. 135 sounds a bit heavy if you can’t hit 6 (as cool as 1 plate looks) so maybe 90-95 lbs for sets of 6+ and gradually progress

#3

Thanks!

#4

This a very old rule of tumb… on pressing movements look at 80% or so less on combine weight on a DB movement than the on its straight bar counter part. Mostly due too the required stabilization of the DB’s

#5

depends on the context of the program. These are different lifts that serve slightly different purposes. As a beginner, it’s probably not going to make a huge difference, but for me, having both in my programming is important.

I have a feeling you’re using dumbbells that are too heavy for you, though. I’m a world class strongman competitor, I’ve pressed a 290 lbs log overhead, and 60 lbs dumbbells are sufficient for ME to get a really good workout. Often times I go even lighter. I have a feeling that you’re not using proper range of motion, or you’re not truly overhead pressing, but more incline pressing. A strict, vertical, full range dumbbell ohp for 10 reps with 60’s is not that easy.

You can also use different techniques to make lighter dumbbells a more viable option. If you slow down the lowering portion of the movement , and do very strict presses, you’ll fatigue quicker with lighter weights. You should be able to use 40’s and still wear yourself out. You can also minimize rest times between sets. And again, make sure you’re not doing these at any incline.

no such thing. Too many variables. It’s not a good question. If your question is ‘what weight would I use to get 6-10 reps’, then I’d guess something in the 110-120 range.

#6

I meant converting seated dumb bell shoulder press to STANDING OVERHEAD BARBELL PRESS(1 OF THE 4 COMPOUND LIFTS)

for the seated dumb bells I can do 60lb dumbbells or 6-8 reps however on the compound I can do 135 for 4

#7

And yeah you’re right I could be not going FULL ROM. I’ve been lifting 13-14 months and still can’t full do a deadlift so I do Romanian and stiff leg lol

#8

Seated db press is a compound lift

#9

I get what you’re asking. There is no such thing as a conversion formula for this, because everyone has different abilities to use their arms together in synergy. Some people are more proficient than others on either the dbs or bb. For me, I lift MUCH heavier barbells than I do combined weight of 2 dumbbells. I can strict overhead press about 240 lbs standing. I don’t think I’ve ever pressed more than 80 lbs dumbbells overhead seated. I see other people pressing heavier dumbbells than me who can’t barbell press what I can. Everyone is different.

Honestly, it’s not a hard thing for yourself to figure out, just go into the gym and perform both lifts, and log it.

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#10

Why worry about conversion? Just run it with the same progressive overload as you would for a barbell lift.

I swapped out a single arm dumbbell shoulder press for barbell OHP and it was the best thing I did for my back. I wish I had stuck to doing it, because I started at 50lbs, was around 65lbs when I stopped, and was hoping to be at 90lbs by the end of that summer.