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Rep Scheme to Increase My Deadlift?

Hi guys,

I started deadlifting in september and have been increasing my 1rm 5 pounds every week. I got up to a personal record of 365 pounds. By the way, i am 155 pounds and i am 19 years old. I have been plateaued at this weight for the past month and i do not know what to do to increase it anymore. Can someone give me a rep scheme for me, so my deadlift will increase??

My current rep scheme would be:
135x10
205x8
255x6-8
315x2
and then my 1rm.

Please help me people!! and feel free to correct me if i have a crappy rep scheme. I also forgot to mention that i deadlift approximately once every 6 days.

The Coan/Phillipi routine has worked well for me in the past.

You don’t do nearly enough work, you just try jumping to your max rather than trying to train the lift.

If you feel the need to go to your max every time you train DL, at least take smaller jumps to it. bar,95,135,185,225,275,315,340,365 something like that. And then drop the weight for some work with doubles or triples…

I don’t recommend going to your max on deadlift every week though…

[quote]DixiesFinest wrote:
The Coan/Phillipi routine has worked well for me in the past.[/quote]

this put on 49 lbs for me. and i was even sick and missed nearly 2 weeks of lifting at about week 7.

speed was the thing that helped me the most. on another day i did clean, power cleans, and speed box squats and i think it helped a lot. i do know my deadlift flies off the ground now instead of grinding out for several seconds.

Looks like you are training to test your strength every week rather than increase your strength. There’s a big difference.

That Coan/Phillipi program is a great suggestion.

There are a lot of people who train for a new max every week and make awesome gains on the deadlift…

I would say if you train to max each week, listen to westside and change around exercises at least… Though that much max pulling is still questionable…

Just train to get stronger… Use the magic 80% 1RM for 5x3 and I bet things will start to move.

Obviously you should evaluate technique. Post a video.

[quote]Ghost16 wrote:
There are a lot of people who train for a new max every week and make awesome gains on the deadlift… [/quote]

And none of them pull more than 500…

[quote]Ghost16 wrote:
There are a lot of people who train for a new max every week and make awesome gains on the deadlift… [/quote]

There are programs that call for work sets of singles, like the Gary DL program. However, that is 10 singles, not one. Also, the OP has been DLing for four months. IMO, he should be focusing on building a good base rather than maxing each week. I do know some very experienced lifters who pull max every time they train. But they pull once a month. Not weekly.

Juggernaut method or ws4sb version 3

i will try to post a video sometime soon! thanks guys

coan-phillipi 365 to 405

Based on a 365 lbs (166 kg) current max and a 405 lbs (184 kg) desired max we get the following cycle. Weights are rounded to the nearest 5 lbs. Notation: sets x reps @ weight.

NOTES: Percentages for the deadlifts are based on the desired max whereas percentages for the power shrugs are based on the current max. Rest 90-120 sec between sets of all assistance exercises.

Week 1

Deadlift (75%): 1x2 @ 305 lbs
Speed deadlift (60%): 8x3 @ 245 lbs (90 sec rest b/w sets)
3 circuits (rest 90sec between exercises, 2-3 minutes between circuits):
Stiff-leg deadlift: 8 reps
Bent over row: 8 reps
Underhand (reverse) grip lat pulldown: 8 reps
Arched back good morning: 8 reps

Week 2

Deadlift (80%): 1x2 @ 325 lbs
Speed deadlift (65%): 8x3 @ 265 lbs (90 sec rest b/w sets)
3 circuits (rest 90sec between exercises, 2-3 minutes between circuits):
Stiff-leg deadlift: 8 reps
Bent over row: 8 reps
Underhand (reverse) grip lat pulldown: 8 reps
Arched back good morning: 8 reps

Week 3

Deadlift (85%): 1x2 @ 345 lbs
Speed deadlift (70%): 6x3 @ 285 lbs (90-120 sec rest b/w sets)
3 circuits (rest 90sec between exercises, 2-3 minutes between circuits):
Stiff-leg deadlift: 8 reps
Bent over row: 8 reps
Underhand (reverse) grip lat pulldown: 8 reps
Arched back good morning: 8 reps

Week 4

Deadlift (90%): 1x2 @ 365 lbs
Speed deadlift (75%): 5x3 @ 305 lbs (90-120 sec rest b/w sets)
3 circuits (rest 90sec between exercises, 2-3 minutes between circuits):
Stiff-leg deadlift: 8 reps
Bent over row: 8 reps
Underhand (reverse) grip lat pulldown: 8 reps
Arched back good morning: 8 reps

Week 5

Deadlift (80%): 3x3 @ 325 lbs
Speed deadlift (65%): 3x3 @ 265 lbs (120 sec rest b/w sets)
Power shrugs (60% of current): 3x5 @ 220 lbs
Stiff-leg deadlift: 3x5
Bent over row: 3x5
Underhand (reverse) grip lat pulldown: 3x5
Arched back good morning: 3x5

Week 6

Deadlift (85%): 1x2 @ 345 lbs
Speed deadlift (70%): 3x3 @ 285 lbs (120 sec rest b/w sets)
Power shrugs (65% of current): 3x5 @ 235 lbs
Stiff-leg deadlift: 3x5
Bent over row: 3x5
Underhand (reverse) grip lat pulldown: 3x5
Arched back good morning: 3x5

Week 7

Deadlift (90%): 1x2 @ 365 lbs
Speed deadlift (75%): 3x3 @ 305 lbs (120 sec rest b/w sets)
Power shrugs (70% of current): 2x5 @ 255 lbs
Stiff-leg deadlift: 2x5
Bent over row: 2x5
Underhand (reverse) grip lat pulldown: 2x5
Arched back good morning: 2x5

Week 8

Deadlift (95%): 1x2 @ 385 lbs
Speed deadlift (70%): 3x3 @ 285 lbs (120 sec rest b/w sets)
Power shrugs (75% of current): 2x5 @ 275 lbs
Stiff-leg deadlift: 2x5
Bent over row: 2x5
Underhand (reverse) grip lat pulldown: 2x5
Arched back good morning: 2x5

Week 9

Deadlift (97.5%): 1x1 @ 395 lbs
Speed deadlift (70%): 2x3 @ 285 lbs (rest as needed b/w sets)
Power shrugs (75% of current): 2x5 @ 275 lbs
Stiff-leg deadlift: 2x5

Week 10

Deadlift (100%): 1x1 @ 405 lbs
Speed deadlift (60%): 2x3 @ 245 lbs (rest as needed b/w sets)

Week 11: Meet day/max attempt

[quote]daraz wrote:

[quote]Ghost16 wrote:
There are a lot of people who train for a new max every week and make awesome gains on the deadlift… [/quote]

And none of them pull more than 500…[/quote]

I max out every single week and currently pull 515. Patrick4588 maxes every week as well and pulled 574 weighing 180-something. He set a state record…

[quote]kpsnap wrote:

[quote]Ghost16 wrote:
There are a lot of people who train for a new max every week and make awesome gains on the deadlift… [/quote]

There are programs that call for work sets of singles, like the Gary DL program. However, that is 10 singles, not one. Also, the OP has been DLing for four months. IMO, he should be focusing on building a good base rather than maxing each week. I do know some very experienced lifters who pull max every time they train. But they pull once a month. Not weekly. [/quote]

I completely disagree with this. When a lifter first starts deadlifting he has a unique opportunity to add poundage at an incredible rate. My best friend who had never lifted in his life maxed twice a week and got up to a 425 deadlift in 8 weights. That’s a prime example of taking full advantage of noob gains. If he maxed once a month it would have taken him WAY longer to pull that much weight.

“Building a good base”? A good base is a strong base. Whatever gets you strongest is the best approach and for a beginner that is progressing up in weight as fast as your body will possibly let you.

I would never advise a beginning lifter to only train DL once a month and didn’t say that.

There are a lot of programs that allow you to make fast strength gains without maxing every time you’re in the gym. I don’t think maxing at every training session is sustainable or smart. But different strokes for different folks. I’ll be curious to see where you and your friend are with the sport when you’re my age. Good luck to you.

[quote]Ghost16 wrote:
If he maxed once a month it would have taken him WAY longer to pull that much weight.
[/quote]

You don’t know that because he didn’t do that. It’s very possible he could have been stronger had he not done that. Again the hypotheticals revolving around the noob gains is relatively irrelevant.

Everything should be broken down into a cost:benefit ratio. Is it worth the cost of someone learning to deadlift shitty because he always maxed out and couldn’t learn the nuances of the lift, and he may never learn or unlearn the shitty technique, for the sake of a hypothetical few pounds? If he never unlearns said shitty technique and blows out a disc was it worth it?

[quote]LiquidMercury wrote:

[quote]Ghost16 wrote:
If he maxed once a month it would have taken him WAY longer to pull that much weight.
[/quote]

You don’t know that because he didn’t do that. It’s very possible he could have been stronger had he not done that. Again the hypotheticals revolving around the noob gains is relatively irrelevant.

Everything should be broken down into a cost:benefit ratio. Is it worth the cost of someone learning to deadlift shitty because he always maxed out and couldn’t learn the nuances of the lift, and he may never learn or unlearn the shitty technique, for the sake of a hypothetical few pounds? If he never unlearns said shitty technique and blows out a disc was it worth it?[/quote]

“Again the hypotheticals revolving around the noob gains is relatively irrelevant.” You’re going to have to elaborate on this. Noob gains is not a nebulous concept. It’s a very real phenomenom. Gys like Mark Rippetoe are always talking about taking full advantage of new trainees and getting them as strong as possible within the first 6 months.

Who said he learned to deadlift shitty? I spent the first week with him dialing in his form and after that we just piled weight on as fast as we could. I watched him every single workout to make sure his form was acceptable.

His deadlift went from 245 to 425. 180 pounds. If he would have max deadlifted once a month that means he would have had to set 90 pound pr’s each time to gain the same amount of strength.

[quote]kpsnap wrote:
I would never advise a beginning lifter to only train DL once a month and didn’t say that.

There are a lot of programs that allow you to make fast strength gains without maxing every time you’re in the gym. I don’t think maxing at every training session is sustainable or smart. But different strokes for different folks. I’ll be curious to see where you and your friend are with the sport when you’re my age. Good luck to you.[/quote]

I’m not arguing that there are no other ways. I’m just arguing that maxing out each week is one of the viable options. I do believe that maxing out or lifting very near maximal weights as frequently as your body will allow it is the best way for noobies to deadlift though.

OP, I don’t know what program you’re doing now. It sounds like you’re doing a really simple linear progression (you’re adding 5 lbs onto the bar each week). So far you seem to have made great gains and you’ve got a nice deadlift going. But linear progression will only take you so far.

I would pick a program and stick with it for a while. All of the existing programs are good (Coan, 5/3/1, Westside, any of the Bill Starr related programs, etc) and will help you to progress. If you don’t know anything about these programs then I would spend a weekend just learning about them. Pick the one that sounds the best to you and try it out. Give it a few months (or a complete cycle) and see if you like it and make gains from it.

There’s nobody here who can say definitively what rep scheme is going to work best for you. It’s one of those things that you’re going to have to experiment with. Best of luck and if you haven’t started a training log then I would. There’s a lot to be said for being able to track your progress like that.

james

If you really enjoy heavy singles like me take a look at this:

gustrength.com/training:singles

I never read over the posts but i’m sure everyone would agree heavy singles have been apart of powerlifting since the beginning. Because they work.