T Nation

Remembering 9/11

I was on my way into work listening to Mancow in the morning when he said that a small plane had flown into the world trade center. I had the same though Rainjack did, who flies their plane into the world trade building?

I remember the rest of the day being just hazey and unbelievable. We had to turn a radio on that day because we literally couldn’t get any information from news sites on the internet. Everything site was just flooded with traffic I guess.

To this day I still can’t comprehend the pure hatred that one must have in the head and heart to do something like that.

I was in a high school art class. We stopped the class and watched the news. I had no clue what was happening until they said the second tower collapsed. I did not know anyone personally who perished but on fellow in the grade below me actually had an aunt who was on one of the planes. Like everyone else I was very much moved and impacted by the images, but initially I felt more angry than sad.

I’m still glad they didn’t go after the CDC headquarters in Atlanta, I could see it from my dorm room.

I was at work at my former job. Ironically, I was supposed to fly out that Thursday for my job interview with the comapany that I work for now. I was just coming back from getting my breakfast from the cafeteria when I saw everyone crowded around the TV monitors around the building.

I asked what was going on and people were quiet and in shock around me. It was pretty unnerving because the building I worked in was huge, but you could hear a pin drop. I remember thinking that this can’t be real, it’s a stunt for a movie or something. When I got home, I got a phone call from one of my cousins. She told me that one our cousins worked in one of the buildings. He didn’t come out. This day is pretty hard for me and my family.

Running around the track in Gym class as a freshman in high school. I remember hearing my gym teacher gettin a phone call with her screamin in to the phone that “the pentagon blew up?!” Shortly after that in my 2nd class we had the TV’s on and watched everything. I can remember one of the assistant principals tellin all of us in my class that “pay attention, this is going to change y’alls lives the most out of anyones” and man he couldn’t have been more right. RIP to all those lost that day and my prayers still go out to their families

damn dude its really been 7 years? where the fuck has the time gone?

cant believe i was 13. anyway i skipped school that day…as i usually did…and i remember my mom calling me into the kitchen after the first plane hit then we were watching it and like 10 minutes later i see the next plane crash into it. shit was crazy dude. she was like thinking there was some shit wrong with the ATC or something and i was like nah, you dont just fly into a building on accident. …crazy shit.

[quote]ALDurr wrote:
I was at work at my former job. Ironically, I was supposed to fly out that Thursday for my job interview with the comapany that I work for now. I was just coming back from getting my breakfast from the cafeteria when I saw everyone crowded around the TV monitors around the building.

I asked what was going on and people were quiet and in shock around me. It was pretty unnerving because the building I worked in was huge, but you could hear a pin drop. I remember thinking that this can’t be real, it’s a stunt for a movie or something. When I got home, I got a phone call from one of my cousins. She told me that one our cousins worked in one of the buildings. He didn’t come out. This day is pretty hard for me and my family.[/quote]

If I remember correctly, rrjc5488 lost his dad to the terrorists.

His story will make you cry.

[quote]rainjack wrote:
If I remember correctly, rrjc5488 lost his dad to the terrorists.

His story will make you cry. [/quote]

NO! That is absolutely awful.

[quote]rainjack wrote:
ALDurr wrote:
I was at work at my former job. Ironically, I was supposed to fly out that Thursday for my job interview with the comapany that I work for now. I was just coming back from getting my breakfast from the cafeteria when I saw everyone crowded around the TV monitors around the building.

I asked what was going on and people were quiet and in shock around me. It was pretty unnerving because the building I worked in was huge, but you could hear a pin drop. I remember thinking that this can’t be real, it’s a stunt for a movie or something. When I got home, I got a phone call from one of my cousins. She told me that one our cousins worked in one of the buildings. He didn’t come out. This day is pretty hard for me and my family.

If I remember correctly, rrjc5488 lost his dad to the terrorists.

His story will make you cry. [/quote]

Fuck! I didn’t know that! My heart goes out to him. I know what it is like to lose a parent to sickness, but you pretty much know its coming. A tragedy like this has got to be even worse.

First week of college for me…

I was at a commuter school at the time and was just getting out of bed to start some homework as my father called me and as soon as I turned on the TV the second plane hit seconds later.

Much to my astonishment my western civ 2 class was not canceled and without acknowledging anything happened that day my professor went on with his whole lecture. Then he went to collect the homework that no one finished.

Though 9/11 was incredibly sad, every year, I read this poem that I found to remind me that in the grand scheme of things, it’s going to get worse.

I’d like to ask you to join me
in a moment of silence
in honour of those who died
in the World Trade Centre
and the Pentagon
last September 11th.
I would also like to ask you
a moment of silence
for all of those who have been
harassed, imprisoned, disappeared,
tortured, raped, or killed
in retaliation for those strikes,
for the victims in both
Afghanistan and the U.S.
And if I could just add one more thing…
A full day of silence
for the tens of thousands of Palestinians
who have died at the hands of
U.S.-backed Israeli forces
over decades of occupation.
Six months of silence
for the million and-a-half Iraqi people,
mostly children, who have died of
malnourishment or starvation
as a result of an 11-year U.S. embargo
against the country.
Before I begin this poem:
two months of silence
for the Blacks under Apartheid
in South Africa,
where homeland security
made them aliens
in their own country.
Nine months of silence
for the dead in Hiroshima
and Nagasaki, where death rained
down and peeled back
every layer of concrete, steel, earth and skin
and the survivors went on as if alive.
A year of silence
for the millions of dead
in Vietnam–a people, not a war-
for those who know a thing or two
about the scent of burning fuel,
their relatives’ bones buried in it,
their babies born of it.
A year of silence
for the dead in Cambodia and Laos,
victims of a secret war … ssssshhhhh …
Say nothing … we don’t want them to learn
that they are dead.
Two months of silence
for the decades of dead
in Colombia, whose names,
like the corpses they once represented,
have piled up and slipped off
our tongues.
Before I begin this poem,
An hour of silence for El Salvador …
An afternoon of silence
for Nicaragua …
Two days of silence
for the Guetmaltecos …
None of whom ever knew
a moment of peace
45 seconds of silence
for the 45 dead
at Acteal, Chiapas
25 years of silence
for the hundred million Africans
who found their graves
far deeper in the ocean
than any building could
poke into the sky.
There will be no DNA testing
or dental records
to identify their remains.
And for those who were
strung and swung
from the heights of
sycamore trees
in the south, the north,
the east, and the west…
100 years of silence…
For the hundreds of millions of
indigenous peoples
from this half of right here,
Whose land and lives were stolen,
In postcard-perfect plots
like Pine Ridge,
Wounded Knee,
Sand Creek, Fallen Timbers,
or the Trail of Tears.
Names now reduced
to innocuous magnetic poetry
on the refrigerator
of our consciousness …
So you want a moment of silence?
And we are all left speechless
Our tongues snatched from our mouths
Our eyes stapled shut
A moment of silence
And the poets have all been laid to rest
The drums disintegrating into dust
Before I begin this poem,
You want a moment of silence
You mourn now as if the world will never be the
same
And the rest of us hope to hell it won’t be.
Not like it always has been
Because this is not a 9-1-1 poem
This is a 9/10 poem,
It is a 9/9 poem,
A 9/8 poem,
A 9/7 poem
This is a 1492 poem.
This is a poem about
what causes poems like this
to be written
And if this is a 9/11 poem, then
This is a September 11th poem
for Chile, 1971
This is a September 12th poem
for Steven Biko in South Africa, 1977
This is a September 13th poem
for the brothers at Attica Prison,
New York, 1971.
This is a September 14th poem
for Somalia, 1992.
This is a poem
for every date that falls
to the ground in ashes
This is a poem for the 110 stories
that were never told
The 110 stories that history
chose not to write in textbooks
The 110 stories that CNN, BBC,
The New York Times,
and Newsweek ignored
This is a poem
for interrupting this program.
And still you want
a moment of silence
for your dead?
We could give you
lifetimes of empty:
The unmarked graves
The lost languages
The uprooted trees and histories
The dead stares on the faces
of nameless children
Before I start this poem
We could be silent forever
Or just long enough to hunger,
For the dust to bury us
And you would still ask us
For more of our silence.
If you want a moment of silence
Then stop the oil pumps
Turn off the engines and the televisions
Sink the cruise ships
Crash the stock markets
Unplug the marquee lights,
Delete the instant messages,
Derail the trains, the light rail transit
If you want a moment of silence,
put a brick through
the window of Taco Bell,
And pay the workers for wages lost
Tear down the liquor stores,
The townhouses, the White Houses,
the jailhouses, the Penthouses and
the Playboys.
If you want a moment of silence,
Then take it
On Super Bowl Sunday,
The Fourth of July
During Dayton’s 13 hour sale
Or the next time your white guilt
fills the room where my beautiful
people have gathered
You want a moment of silence
Then take it
Now,
Before this poem begins.
Here, in the echo of my voice,
In the pause between goosesteps of the second
hand
In the space
between bodies in embrace,
Here is your silence.
Take it.
But take it all
Don’t cut in line.
Let your silence begin
at the beginning of crime But we,
Tonight we will keep right on singing
For our dead.
-Anonymous

[quote]rainjack wrote:

If I remember correctly, rrjc5488 lost his dad to the terrorists.

His story will make you cry. [/quote]

Really, wow, that’s horrible.

If you are reading this thread rrjc5488, my condolences for your loss.

I was 4 months pg, still in the NAVY…I had the day off, but had a meeting to go to later in the morning…so I was ironing my uniform and I got a phone call saying the meeting was canceled…I asked ‘why?’ And my supervisor told me to turn the news on, when normally I DO have it on…
My heart sank when there was word of a missing 4th plane, as my hubby was out to sea at the time…I don’t think I went to work the rest of the week, as the base was in threat con DELTA…I was glued to the tv, even though I didn’t want to watch anymore.

[quote]kellerdp wrote:
Though 9/11 was incredibly sad, every year, I read this poem that I found to remind me that in the grand scheme of things, it’s going to get worse.

a bunch of stuff about how terrible the world is, especially because of America

-Anonymous[/quote]

There are days of rememberance for a lot of different events and atrocities. This thread is about 9/11, not those other things. We don’t remember Pearl Harbor today, or the sinking of the Maine, or Martin Luther King Jr, or [insert name of whatever you want]. Go start another thread if you want, but don’t bring it in this one, because it’s not wanted.

DB

I know that this is a real loss for some of you. I can not explain how sorry I am for the people and families that died for senseless violence. I too have lost a family member unexpectedly. So I know how it feels.

But I think if I died in an attack. That I would want everyone to move forward. Don’t forget, but to move forward with your life. Observe a strong moment of silence for the loss the families endured and are still enduring.

But healing for your country can only begin with your personal steps forward. Talking about it to death like it just happened, reopens the wounds for everyone.

A great American I admire said in a movie

“Its not about how you hit, Its about how hard you can get hit and get back up and keep on going forward.”

I now will observe my moment of silence for all that was lost on 9-11. Then I will pick up and go about my day and try not to give it a second thought. Cause if I did the people responsible for 9-11 have won with there plan of terror.

[quote]rainjack wrote:

If I remember correctly, rrjc5488 lost his dad to the terrorists.

His story will make you cry. [/quote]

You’re right, rrjc5488 did lose his dad on 9/11.

Ryan, I hope you don’t mind that I repost what you wrote here on T-Nation, on the 9/11 anniversary 2 years ago. You, my friend, are in my thoughts and prayers today.

Here’s what rrjc5488 wrote:

As some of you know, my dad was killed on 9/11. I’m not looking for pity, or anything like that… I just wrote this essay for a writing class and figured I’d post it here. Its pretty long, so be warned.

Five years is a pretty long time, especially when someone asks you to recall what you did that day.  For many people, remembering what they did on September 11th 2001 isn't very hard.  I'm one of those people who wouldn't have a problem remembering, but might have a hard time reliving it.

I woke up, got ready for school, and had breakfast like usual. Come time to go to school, my mom drove my dad to the train station and me to school. Unfortunately, he had gone into work early that day; a decision that would change hundreds of peoples lives forever. My mom dropped him off before I did underneath the train station in town; a landmark that I would see almost everyday. He got out of the car, and gave me a hug and a kiss thru the back seat window and then walked up the stairs to the platform as we drove only a few blocks away to school.

School started with my friends and me hanging out in front of the school until we were let in. My first class was technology. We started off the class, until a few minutes in, he received a phone call. His face turned blank and sat down, then hung up. He told the class something very bad had happened, and that he was told not to tell us anything. He told us, he said “You’re still young, but you’re old enough that you should know what’s going on. A plane was flown into the world trade center.”

Immediately, I thought of my father, who worked in the towers, and my cousin, who worked in an office some one hundred feet away. I began to tremble, and almost got annoyed as friends kept asking me “doesn’t your dad work there?” He rolled a TV into the room, and we all just watched the news in silence. Pretty hard to imagine a middle school class in silence, isn’t it? It happened.

At the end of the period, I was called down to the guidance office for my guidance counselor to tell me “I don’t know if you know what’s going on, but your mom spoke to your dad. He’s OK and he’s coming home.” I had never felt so relieved.

I went home after that. I walked into our Florida room to see my older brother who had gotten home before me, and my mom watching the news. Both of them had tears in their eyes. By the time I got home, the second plane had hit.

Shortly after I got home, family friends started coming over, comforting us and bringing us food. We live down the block from the high school, which my older brother attended. Friends from school came down to visit us during the day. More people kept coming, people I had never seen before came over comforting my family. The day went by extremely fast. Having kept in the back of my mind “Dad called, and he’s coming home” I wasn’t worried. My brothers and I did quite the job of forwarding that message to my dads friends as they called and explained to us how he knew him, and asked to speak to him.

Once it started getting dark, was when I and everyone else started to worry. He wasn’t home yet. “He had to be coming home, he said he was” everyone kept repeating. Come 1 o clock in the morning, while most people had left except my relatives, we went to sleep. Or, tried to, at least. My brothers and I slept on air mattresses in the hallway in front of the front door. We wanted to be there, so when he walked thru the doors we would meet him there. where we used to every night he came home from work. I don’t think any of us slept that night; we just lied there in silence.

The next morning, we all woke up. It was pretty glum for most of the day. It was similar to the 11th, except a lot of people came and a lot less “don’t worry” comments that were once reassuring, were said. No one really knew what to do. Over the course of the day, there must have been a hundred people stop by and try to comfort us.

That night the town had vigils, masses, and any other gathering one could think of to display people’s feelings. That night, family and friends packed into our kitchen, living room, porch, and dining room for a service said by a local bishop. I have never seen so many people cry in one room before. People stayed into the late hours of the night, which, at that point, we just wanted to go to sleep. Most of us actually got some sleep since we were so beat from the past two days or so.

The next day, the 13th, we had pretty much given up hope. The past two days events had been surreal. This, though, was as real as it gets. It finally hit us, reality, that he wasn’t coming home. It hit my brothers, my mom, and I harder than anything we could ever imagine. The joyful greeting my we always used to present to my dad after he got home from work, would never happen again. To this day, it’s hard to be at peace with never seeing him again.

That Sunday, we had his funeral mass. It was a sight to see. St. Agnes, our awesome, majestic, huge cathedral had been packed, and even then, people were out the door. My younger brother did an awesome job telling the entire church, yes, the entire church of well over a thousand people, a story about my dad. He did a much better job than I would have been able to. It was a funny story; we heard a lot of laughing, which was good. The priest, who is now an extremely close family friend wanted to celebrate his life, not mourn his death. On such a horrible day, it was nice to see how many people had cared for him and loved him.

While many people experience a huge loss in their life, it’s usually not at such a young age. While anyone in my position would do anything to change what happened, they couldn’t. The only thing I can do is to make the best out of the situation. The most important thing I have learned from this event is to life everyday to the fullest. James Dean once said “Dream as if you’ll live forever, live as if you’ll die today.” Unfortunately, a lot of people found out the hard way that day that someone can be taken from you in an instant; not to mention your own life.

George Santayana said “Those who cannot learn from history are doomed to repeat it.” This is as true as it comes. If we forget about this, it will happen again. We have to always keep something of this magnitude in the back of our minds; it’s obvious our America has. From civil liberties to patriotism, American life is different. Things will, and should, never be the same.

IRT Dollarbill:

Sure thing man. Though, 9-11 didn’t happen in a vacuum. The events that lead up to 9-11 and that are happening now are just as important, and to forget them does not give anyone a legitimate excuse for wondering why something horrible happens. I didn’t post the poem because I hate America. I love this damn country. I just think that in the grand scheme of things, 9/11 wasn’t the worst thing that happened in the world. To the US, perhaps. I just hope that we (as a nation, perhaps as a world community) can look back at 9/11 and all the other atrocities and try to learn something from them, as opposed to paying them lip service once a year with a flag at half-mast, a moment of silence, and a ridiculous montage of the towers going down over and over and over again before people down their coffee and forget everything later in the evening.

As for me, I was late to school when everything went down. To be honest, it didn’t really affect me at all.

I felt so disconnected from 9/11 because I and no one I knew was affected personally (other than outraged at the attacks).

Looking back now through the lens of maturity, I feel a deep sadness for any American that lost their life at the hands of the terrorists. I also feel sad for anyone, anywhere who has lost their life at the hands of terrorists.

[quote]kellerdp wrote:
Though 9/11 was incredibly sad, every year, I read this poem that I found to remind me that in the grand scheme of things, it’s going to get worse.

-Anonymous[/quote]

I just wish all the people that died on 9/11 would be there when you died so they could take turns pissing on your grave. You take a thread dedicated to the memory of a bunch of innocent people who were ruthlessly murdered and try and twist it to your political benefit. You are the lowest common denominator.

[quote]DoubleDuce wrote:
kellerdp wrote:
Though 9/11 was incredibly sad, every year, I read this poem that I found to remind me that in the grand scheme of things, it’s going to get worse.

-Anonymous

I just wish all the people that died on 9/11 would be there when you died so they could take turns pissing on your grave. You take a thread dedicated to the memory of a bunch of innocent people who were ruthlessly murdered and try and twist it to your political benefit. You are the lowest common denominator.[/quote]

lol.

Sweet deal man. Your internet rage is as hilarious as it is ignorant.

I just think that it is as important to remember the events that lead or may have lead up to 9/11, as it is to remember 9/11.

But props to you being ‘mad’ and all. Perhaps you could have sent a PM instead of ‘twisting’ the thread to display your anger?

[quote]DoubleDuce wrote:
kellerdp wrote:
Though 9/11 was incredibly sad, every year, I read this poem that I found to remind me that in the grand scheme of things, it’s going to get worse.

-Anonymous

I just wish all the people that died on 9/11 would be there when you died so they could take turns pissing on your grave. You take a thread dedicated to the memory of a bunch of innocent people who were ruthlessly murdered and try and twist it to your political benefit. You are the lowest common denominator.[/quote]

OK stop right there otherwise this thread is going to get derailed. It did a while back when some asshat said some stupid shit about it on a similar thread.