T Nation

Regarding Circadian Testosterone Levels

I understand that in healthy men that the circulating testosterone levels are higher in the early AM and thus responsible in part for morning wood.
What I do not understand is that if a man is on TRT, would his plasma levels be relatively uniform through out the day and not peaking at any particular time thus suggesting that something other than just testosterone would come into play with the morning wood indicator.

Curious what others might know about this.

its more than just testosterone…not sure all the factors, but they include body temperature, blood flow, and muscle relaxation that occurs while you sleep…I’m sure there are many others.

Testosterone has a half life of only two to four hours, and yes, plasma levels do fluctuate. There are some good papers you can find on this by Googling.

I’ve been doing some experimentation, and morning wood is more complex than just a jolt of T. But if you are HR anyway, it can sure help!

Dooright,

What do you mean by HR? With respect to half life of T, when we are injecting, with the esters, my understanding is it is released much more slowly and the half life is much longer depending on the ester.

[quote]tuscans wrote:
Dooright,

What do you mean by HR? With respect to half life of T, when we are injecting, with the esters, my understanding is it is released much more slowly and the half life is much longer depending on the ester. [/quote]

I think (hope) he was talking about T levels in natural men, not those on TRT…the half life of someone who injects is obviously much longer than a few hours

Right. T cipionate and T enanthate esters release their T gradually over days, or weeks. That’s a “convenience” created by the pharmaceutical industry to keep patients coming back for their regularly-scheduled injections.

This may be a practical solution for most with low natural T, but it does not mimic nature’s pulsatile daily T cycle, and it shuts down any remaining natural T production.

[quote]dooright wrote:
Right. T cipionate and T enanthate esters release their T gradually over days, or weeks. That’s a “convenience” created by the pharmaceutical industry to keep patients coming back for their regularly-scheduled injections.

This may be a practical solution for most with low natural T, but it does not mimic nature’s pulsatile daily T cycle, and it shuts down any remaining natural T production.

[/quote]

This is a good point.

I don’t know if anybody has tried TRT with Test Suspension, which is basically pure test in water and enters the bloodstream immediately. Anecdotally, I’ve heard it burns like a son of a bitch to inject. I doubt this would be practical for daily morning shots, but it is an interesting idea.

I’m about a month and a half into sane (sub-physiological) amounts of sublingual straight T. So far, so good.

Has anyone else tried this on a long-term basis, or know of any reports?

I have always heard that sub-lingual or any other oral form of T is useless. I’ll be curious to see your results on it.