T Nation

Recent Killing Spree In Tokyo...

I’m sure some of you have seen this already. They have pictures of the guy now. He looks almost exactly like Kim Jong Il. It was also reported that he would be put to death, which surprised the hell out of me because I wouldn’t have guessed they had the death penalty.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/asia-pacific/7445694.stm

[quote]beebuddy wrote:
I’m sure some of you have seen this already. They have pictures of the guy now. He looks almost exactly like Kim Jong Il. It was also reported that he would be put to death, which surprised the hell out of me because I wouldn’t have guessed they had the death penalty.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/asia-pacific/7445694.stm [/quote]

They should make him commit seppoku! Though that was seen as an honorable death, which he probably doesn’t deserve.

Cunts like that aren’t worthy of Seppuku.

Hang him by his feet until he dies. I also like how there are people in Japan calling for government reform and all that shit when such occurrences are fairly uncommon.

[quote]Makavali wrote:
Cunts like that aren’t worthy of Seppuku.

Hang him by his feet until he dies. I also like how there are people in Japan calling for government reform and all that shit when such occurrences are fairly uncommon.[/quote]

Who knows, maybe they’ll come up with something and achieve what the USA hasn’t by actually preventing these strange massacres.

I actually left Akihabara about 2 hours before the massacre. I was looking for an English copy of GTA4, ironically.

A lot of people don’t know this or wouldn’t expect it, but Japanese news is extremely graphic. For example, if a motorcycle accident is being reported on, they’ll show the blood and brains strewn all over the concrete.

When I saw footage of what happened, I felt sick to my stomach. The intersection was absolutely covered in red. 7 innocent strangers…killed…because some fuckwit from Aomori-ken had the urge.

Japan IS a relatively safe country, but what spooks me is that when a killing does occur, it is often completely random.

Damn shame. Unfortunate side-effect of the mushrooming fureeta, as well as social withdrawal. Hikokomori (people with extreme social withdrawal) aren’t a new phenomenom; in fact, it’s an old and rather serious one. IMO, the problem is widespread on a broad level in Japan, but usually gone unnoticed.

On a related note, they have games now, simulating human communication, encouraging people to become more open socially. I believe one just involves you looking recordings of people in the eye. All very curious things to think about.

This stuff happens as often here as the random shootings happen in the US (suggesting that guns are not the problem, but we don’t want to completely derail the thread this early, do we?).

As has been stated, overall, this country IS really safe, but there are some very dark undercurrents running through it which do bubble to the surface, with the results we are seeing.

Also, mental and social disorders are very often just swept under the rug here, which is a big part of the problem. The society is so rooted in uniformity and conformism that, when someone is a little bit different, their isolation and alienation is usually terribly magnified by their being ever more shunned by society at large. Even the people who would be inclined to help such people can be ostracized by their peers by the mere act of associating with such a person.

I have a kids’ English school right by the major train station in my city, and to say that there are not some characters that walk by my school which give me some serious reserve would be the understatement of the year. It makes me feel safe that I am bigger than almost everyone in this country, but my wife is tiny, and I worry about her when she is alone in the school.

““The Asahi newspaper reported that there have been 67 random killings in Japan in the last 10 years, on average between three and 10 each year. Last year there were eight. The year before there were four.””

Cortes, I would have to say that the entire country of Japan doesn’t hold a candle to even the District of Colombia.

[quote]Cortes wrote:
mental and social disorders are very often just swept under the rug here, which is a big part of the problem. The society is so rooted in uniformity and conformism that, when someone is a little bit different, their isolation and alienation is usually terribly magnified by their being ever more shunned by society at large. [/quote]

Yes; this is what I was trying to say when I typed “unnoticed,” but Cortes said it far better. I’m probably less knowledgeable than you, but it’s a bit of a vicious cycle. Once you drop out of the standard Japanese path, it gets increasingly harder to get back into the regular flow of things. Becoming a fureeta allows you to beat the system for some period of time, but it’s hardly a sustainable lifestyle. In the end, it’s very hard for fureeta to get careers or start families, and the problems that they sought to escape by becoming part-time workers in the first place come back to haunt them with a vengeance.

If I remember correctly, the killer in the article was bright, and yet - and this is me reading between the lines - stuck in a dead-end, part time job. With no way out, and, likely, no social or state support, his problems were magnified and spilled out into this. As I said before, this is the tip of the iceberg; a rare and extreme expression Japanese society’s darker side.

(Sorry for the long post; I always struggle to write economically)

I’d have put him in a rear naked choke until police arrived.

[quote]beebuddy wrote:
““The Asahi newspaper reported that there have been 67 random killings in Japan in the last 10 years, on average between three and 10 each year. Last year there were eight. The year before there were four.””

Cortes, I would have to say that the entire country of Japan doesn’t hold a candle to even the District of Colombia. [/quote]

I’m talking about the kind of killings we are seeing here, somebody going crazy and killing a bunch of strangers or semi-strangers. I think we can both agree that this is a bit of a “problem” in both countries, despite whatever ratios may exist.

Crime in Japan is much lower than in America and England and other wesetern counties but, as has been said, it usually the one quiet and unassuming guy that flips out and goes on a killing spree.

They do have the death penalty here but only about 6 people a year are executed. A lot of human rights organistaions complain about the way Japan handles executionas there is not prior warning. If you are waiting on death row they can come an execute you any time they see fit and won’t inform the family until after.

The only assurance the convicted has is that if the clock reaches 9 am you are safe for another day as all execution take place in the morning. From what I gather it is supposed to mirror the fact that those who were murdered had no prior warning of what would happen to them.

In Japan the majority of people are pro capital punishment (according to govt statistics anyway) and psychologists believe that as a people the Japanese, living in hgih stress enviroments, need to see karma at work. If someone commits a crime they will be punished qand therefor they (the person slaving away for their company) will be rewarded for doing everything they are supposed to.