T Nation

Raw Squat 585x2

Are you wearing the exact same belt, wraps, clothes and shoes?

Good lifting!

I wouldn’t sweat some form breakdown on heavy-ass weights. That’s not to say that you shouldn’t be constatnly training these key form points (sit back, knees out, chest up, tuck elbows). But the fact of the matter is max weights break down your form. If they didn’t, the bar would probably keep going up.

[quote]Hanley wrote:
It’s funny how you’re genuinely asking for advice (and seemingly taking it all on board!) when you outsquat pretty much everyone who posts here!![/quote]

Why?

[quote]Airtruth wrote:
Hanley wrote:
It’s funny how you’re genuinely asking for advice (and seemingly taking it all on board!) when you outsquat pretty much everyone who posts here!!

Why?[/quote]

How did you increase your 575x2 squat to 600x2?

[quote]Airtruth wrote:
Hanley wrote:
It’s funny how you’re genuinely asking for advice (and seemingly taking it all on board!) when you outsquat pretty much everyone who posts here!!

Why?[/quote]

I wouldn’t ask a guy who’s never ran faster than a 5 minute mile how to push my 4:10 mile into the sub-4’s.

[quote]Hanley wrote:
Airtruth wrote:
Hanley wrote:
It’s funny how you’re genuinely asking for advice (and seemingly taking it all on board!) when you outsquat pretty much everyone who posts here!!

Why?

How did you increase your 575x2 squat to 600x2?[/quote]

I didn’t, so by that your saying nobody has ever out squatted anybody who trained them how to squat?

Or are you saying that the only person who can teach you how to do something is someone who does it better than you? I guess you’ll never break a record.

Knowing how to do something is only half the battle? Having the ability, focus, and desire also plays a big role.

It’s actually funny you should say that, considering the people that are the best at what they do rarely make the best trainers or coaches.

Fortunately the OP doesn’t have this attitude, and instead just accepts good advice, which is probably how he got to where he is.

[quote]malonetd wrote:
Airtruth wrote:
Hanley wrote:
It’s funny how you’re genuinely asking for advice (and seemingly taking it all on board!) when you outsquat pretty much everyone who posts here!!

Why?

I wouldn’t ask a guy who’s never ran faster than a 5 minute mile how to push my 4:10 mile into the sub-4’s.[/quote]

That’s cool if you wouldn’t ask that person. It’s another thing if you want to discredit good advice because of the source. There’s a difference between saying “Hey I don’t want to listen to you because you never ran it”, then saying “Your advice is completely wrong because you can’t run it.”

Even more the case with someone older than you, they can tell you the mistakes your making because they made those same mistakes and is the reason why they never accomplished it.

If you can’t discern good advice from bad advice then your right you should only listen to someone who has accomplished what you want.

[quote]Airtruth wrote:
Hanley wrote:
Airtruth wrote:
Hanley wrote:
It’s funny how you’re genuinely asking for advice (and seemingly taking it all on board!) when you outsquat pretty much everyone who posts here!!

Why?

How did you increase your 575x2 squat to 600x2?

I didn’t, so by that your saying nobody has ever out squatted anybody who trained them how to squat?

Or are you saying that the only person who can teach you how to do something is someone who does it better than you? I guess you’ll never break a record.

Knowing how to do something is only half the battle? Having the ability, focus, and desire also plays a big role.

It’s actually funny you should say that, considering the people that are the best at what they do rarely make the best trainers or coaches.

Fortunately the OP doesn’t have this attitude, and instead just accepts good advice, which is probably how he got to where he is.[/quote]

My point was, going from a 300lb squat to a 400lb squat is totallly different than going from 400 to 500. And as you move up, the same point holds. The stronger you get, the harder progress becomes. If you haven’t been at a similar level, a lot of the time you just won’t understand how things change as you move up in weight.

When it comes to powerlifting, the strongest peolpe don’t always make the best coaches, I’ll grant you that. BUT, unless you’ve achieved a pretty high level in the sport, you won’t know what it takes to get someone else there. Who do you think are the best lifting coaches out there at the moment? The names that spring to mind are Jim Wendler, Dave Tate, Louie Simmons etc… Maybe not the best lifters that ever lifted, but they were all damn strong, and still are.

Given the choice, I’d ALWAYS listen to the stronger guy first, and the well read guy second. Both my have valid points, but when it comes to strength training, under the bar experience is more important in my opinion.

Finally, I’ll never have a record… I squatted 600lb as a 220lb drug free junior in single ply gear earlier this year. An irish national record :stuck_out_tongue:

[quote]Mega Newb wrote:
Hanley wrote:
Did I miss a T-Nation article where the author mentioned “buttwink” recently?? Because it certainly seems to be the new buzzword around here.

lol

I always get this messed up, you turn the lift into sort of a good morning when you squat. So fixing this would mean working on your good morning to help you move more weight? Or it would be working more on quad strength to help you stay upright?

Im going to say go with good mornings because all though it may make your squat form worse, it will definitely raise your squat max considering your sticking point/slow area seems to come in right about where some good morning strength could come in handy.

[/quote]

It does look like you go into a good morning a tad bit. Lots of weight and good depth. Just don’t injure yourself.

Have you tried using straps? That’s the third grip option if the other two grips don’t work for you. There’s also a front squat harness. I’ve never used it but looks like a viable option

[quote]Airtruth wrote:
malonetd wrote:
Airtruth wrote:
Hanley wrote:
It’s funny how you’re genuinely asking for advice (and seemingly taking it all on board!) when you outsquat pretty much everyone who posts here!!

Why?

I wouldn’t ask a guy who’s never ran faster than a 5 minute mile how to push my 4:10 mile into the sub-4’s.

That’s cool if you wouldn’t ask that person. It’s another thing if you want to discredit good advice because of the source. There’s a difference between saying “Hey I don’t want to listen to you because you never ran it”, then saying “Your advice is completely wrong because you can’t run it.”

Even more the case with someone older than you, they can tell you the mistakes your making because they made those same mistakes and is the reason why they never accomplished it.

If you can’t discern good advice from bad advice then your right you should only listen to someone who has accomplished what you want.[/quote]

I don’t necessarily disagree with you here.

My point is, when I’m shooting for a goal, something that most people will never do, my first two choices for advice are someone has already done it or someone who has taught someone to do it.

At the same time, I wouldn’t disregard anyone else’s sound advice. It just seems all too common on this website – not specifically this thread – some of the least experienced people are shouting their advice the loudest.

Strong squats man, congrats.

[quote]ignignokt wrote:

TunaMonkey wrote:
I am unable to hold the bar correctly for front squats, they end up being more like Zerchers. I tried the wrist bent back version and the arms crossed and cannot do either.

Have you tried using straps? That’s the third grip option if the other two grips don’t work for you. There’s also a front squat harness. I’ve never used it but looks like a viable option
[/quote]

My training partner builds equipment and a harness for front squats is on his list.

[quote]TunaMonkey wrote:

My training partner builds equipment and a harness for front squats is on his list.[/quote]

We have one of these at the gym. I would not recommend it as a template if you plan on making one. Lots have tried it. None have liked it. If you look at the bottom of the device, it’s like having a pair of scissors pressed against your junk (the guy has no weight on the bar, so he can hold it up).

It is good to see that big weight can be lifted the way I squat. My back comes down like that too due to a tight sacrotuberous ligament that keeps my hips relatively tight.

Keep up the excellent work and as always, pay close attention to your back and any little pinch or pull you may notice.

[quote]Hanley wrote:
Airtruth wrote:
Hanley wrote:
Airtruth wrote:
Hanley wrote:
It’s funny how you’re genuinely asking for advice (and seemingly taking it all on board!) when you outsquat pretty much everyone who posts here!!

Why?

How did you increase your 575x2 squat to 600x2?

I didn’t, so by that your saying nobody has ever out squatted anybody who trained them how to squat?

Or are you saying that the only person who can teach you how to do something is someone who does it better than you? I guess you’ll never break a record.

Knowing how to do something is only half the battle? Having the ability, focus, and desire also plays a big role.

It’s actually funny you should say that, considering the people that are the best at what they do rarely make the best trainers or coaches.

Fortunately the OP doesn’t have this attitude, and instead just accepts good advice, which is probably how he got to where he is.

My point was, going from a 300lb squat to a 400lb squat is totallly different than going from 400 to 500. And as you move up, the same point holds. The stronger you get, the harder progress becomes. If you haven’t been at a similar level, a lot of the time you just won’t understand how things change as you move up in weight.

When it comes to powerlifting, the strongest peolpe don’t always make the best coaches, I’ll grant you that. BUT, unless you’ve achieved a pretty high level in the sport, you won’t know what it takes to get someone else there.

Who do you think are the best lifting coaches out there at the moment? The names that spring to mind are Jim Wendler, Dave Tate, Louie Simmons etc… Maybe not the best lifters that ever lifted, but they were all damn strong, and still are.

Given the choice, I’d ALWAYS listen to the stronger guy first, and the well read guy second. Both my have valid points, but when it comes to strength training, under the bar experience is more important in my opinion.

Finally, I’ll never have a record… I squatted 600lb as a 220lb drug free junior in single ply gear earlier this year. An irish national record :stuck_out_tongue:
[/quote]

I hate makin up but congratulations.

[quote]Airtruth wrote:
Hanley wrote:
Airtruth wrote:
Hanley wrote:
Airtruth wrote:
Hanley wrote:
It’s funny how you’re genuinely asking for advice (and seemingly taking it all on board!) when you outsquat pretty much everyone who posts here!!

Why?

How did you increase your 575x2 squat to 600x2?

I didn’t, so by that your saying nobody has ever out squatted anybody who trained them how to squat?

Or are you saying that the only person who can teach you how to do something is someone who does it better than you? I guess you’ll never break a record.

Knowing how to do something is only half the battle? Having the ability, focus, and desire also plays a big role.

It’s actually funny you should say that, considering the people that are the best at what they do rarely make the best trainers or coaches.

Fortunately the OP doesn’t have this attitude, and instead just accepts good advice, which is probably how he got to where he is.

My point was, going from a 300lb squat to a 400lb squat is totallly different than going from 400 to 500. And as you move up, the same point holds. The stronger you get, the harder progress becomes. If you haven’t been at a similar level, a lot of the time you just won’t understand how things change as you move up in weight.

When it comes to powerlifting, the strongest peolpe don’t always make the best coaches, I’ll grant you that. BUT, unless you’ve achieved a pretty high level in the sport, you won’t know what it takes to get someone else there.

Who do you think are the best lifting coaches out there at the moment? The names that spring to mind are Jim Wendler, Dave Tate, Louie Simmons etc… Maybe not the best lifters that ever lifted, but they were all damn strong, and still are.

Given the choice, I’d ALWAYS listen to the stronger guy first, and the well read guy second. Both my have valid points, but when it comes to strength training, under the bar experience is more important in my opinion.

Finally, I’ll never have a record… I squatted 600lb as a 220lb drug free junior in single ply gear earlier this year. An irish national record :stuck_out_tongue:

I hate makin up but congratulations.[/quote]

Haha provided that’s sarcasm free, thank you!

[quote]johnnytang24 wrote:
We have one of these at the gym. I would not recommend it as a template if you plan on making one. Lots have tried it. None have liked it. If you look at the bottom of the device, it’s like having a pair of scissors pressed against your junk (the guy has no weight on the bar, so he can hold it up).[/quote]

Hey Johnny, are you saying you don’t recommend front squat harnesses in general or the one you posted in the picture?

Can you recommend a front squat harness?

(sorry – I hope this isn’t a thread hijack)

OK, I hope the other people who have replied will at least think I am a little qualified to comment!!!

There are a few things that I can tell you to change that will help you be a better squatter!!

I only have time for one or two right now!! First, I would reccomend you change your walk out. When you take such big steps out of the rack you have a tendency to loosen your hips in order to step so far back. Take small steps back and widen your feet as you do. Your feet go from right next to each other and then back and over to squat position in one step.

Second, when you where in squat position, your hips are never under you and locked into place. It is impossible to tighten your butt, hips, quads, abs, while in the position you are in. if you bring your hips into forward and locked position that will help cure your pronlem you have when in the hole. If you do not start in the proper position you will not get in proper position anywhere throughout the squat. You have to start properly to be able to do the squat properly!!! Make sense???

I have 3-4 other things I could comment on but I figure I will let some of the other experts rip me before going on!!

BTW, one way to tell if your quads are week is if a lifter squeezes thier knees together during the squat. I did not see you do that in the video.

Also, I could be much more of help to you if I could see your warm-ups first. They are as important as your working set. They are what sets you up for good squatting!! I see all the time lifters warm up one way and then chage their form for their heavy sets!! A BIG NO NO!!!

Gary

"Just remember everything you have ever dreamed of lifting, I already have!!

Very nice squats! I have the exact same form issues.