T Nation

Raw Milk

A dude at my gym lets people milk his cows for 10 bucks a months plus a per gallon fee.

Is this really better than milk from the store?

Risks?

here’s some info pulled from another site

"Pasteurization depletes mineral content, including iron, copper, and manganese, along with vitamin C. It also impairs B6 bioavailability, and it may lower the absorption of vitamin A by destroying a heat-sensitive dairy protein which promotes intestinal absorption of vitamin A.

Raw milk seems to be better tolerated by people who cannot tolerate pasteurized dairy.

Raw milk consumption during childhood is strongly associated with resistance against asthma and allergies later in life.

There?s also the fact that undenatured whey proteins (which, since pasteurization denatured proteins, only comes from raw milk) are able to boost glutathione, the human body?s premier endogenous/homegrown antioxidant. Glutathione combats oxidative stress, improves immunity, and prevents alcohol-related toxicity, to name just a few of its roles. Pasteurized whey proteins have a reduced effect on glutathione."

so there’s definitely some benefits. Is it worth squeezing a cow’s titties for? I dunno

Im sold on it. This cup of milk tastes AMAZING.

I just made some butter too with the cream from the jug and buttermilk

Yesssssssss

[quote]Ct. Rockula wrote:
Risks? [/quote]

Sure, the same risks as always involving internet answers re: dude at the gym

[quote]Ct. Rockula wrote:
Im sold on it. This cup of milk tastes AMAZING.

I just made some butter too with the cream from the jug and buttermilk

Yesssssssss[/quote]

you made your own butter? Are you Amish? I can’t help but laugh at the idea of a 300lb wrestler guy sitting at a churn like some Amish maid.

I have no idea if you are 300lbs or not, that’s just how I picture you.

[quote]rds63799 wrote:

[quote]Ct. Rockula wrote:
Im sold on it. This cup of milk tastes AMAZING.

I just made some butter too with the cream from the jug and buttermilk

Yesssssssss[/quote]

you made your own butter? Are you Amish? I can’t help but laugh at the idea of a 300lb wrestler guy sitting at a churn like some Amish maid.

I have no idea if you are 300lbs or not, that’s just how I picture you.[/quote]

Lol it was really easy

  1. Cut slit in bottom of jug to drain milk which leaves cream in jug
  2. Pour cream in blender and set on mix until it thickens…15 minutes
  3. Drain excess liquid…buttermilk.
  4. Rinse butter
  5. Add fruit syrup or spices
  6. Enjoy

[quote]Ct. Rockula wrote:
I just made some butter too with the cream from the jug and buttermilk[/quote]

Well that pic failed. Anyway, impressive. I don’t know anyone else who makes their own butter.

[quote]Ct. Rockula wrote:
A dude at my gym lets people milk his cows for 10 bucks a months plus a per gallon fee.

Is this really better than milk from the store?

Risks? [/quote]

If the cows are not grass fed you will prob end up with a cesspool in the milk. Just make sure the cows aren’t fed corn. Makes them pretty sick and will make the milk degrade in quality, and increase the risk. Also, they shouldnt be locked up in pens standing in their own feces, but that’s a given.

If all that checks out then you are set

[quote]Ct. Rockula wrote:

[quote]rds63799 wrote:

[quote]Ct. Rockula wrote:
Im sold on it. This cup of milk tastes AMAZING.

I just made some butter too with the cream from the jug and buttermilk

Yesssssssss[/quote]

you made your own butter? Are you Amish? I can’t help but laugh at the idea of a 300lb wrestler guy sitting at a churn like some Amish maid.

I have no idea if you are 300lbs or not, that’s just how I picture you.[/quote]

Lol it was really easy

  1. Cut slit in bottom of jug to drain milk which leaves cream in jug
  2. Pour cream in blender and set on mix until it thickens…15 minutes
  3. Drain excess liquid…buttermilk.
  4. Rinse butter
  5. Add fruit syrup or spices
  6. Enjoy[/quote]

Ct. Rockula. Wrestler by night, domestic goddess by day

Nobody seems to have mentioned the risks yet, so…the whole reason why milk started being pasteurized in the first place is because raw milk is a wonderful medium for growing pathogens. E. coli and salmonella infections from raw milk were rampant in the 19th and early 20th centuries – when folks started shipping milk, but refrigeration techniques were a little bit less than perfect.

Of course, these days more people die from pathogens on unwashed fruit and poorly stored deli meat than pathogens in raw milk.

I think risk management would include things like, always drinking your raw milk within 24 hours of collection (unless you process it via some form of fermentation)…never leaving it out on the counter…making sure the cow’s udders, and your hands, are reasonably clean. Obvious things.

So…it tastes great, and seems to have a better nutrient profile, but it is a known vector for food poisoning bacteria.

[quote]Elegua360 wrote:

So…it tastes great, and seems to have a better nutrient profile, but it is a known vector for food poisoning bacteria.[/quote]

The same with all food, they all are breeding grounds for bacteria. Thanks for pointing out the obvious.

Get the milk below 40 degrees asap, simple as that.

It’s kind of like saying not to eat meat, because just like our bodies, animal cell are outnumbered by non-animal cells. Yes you cook it, but you don’t need to if it’s good quality, just like sushi or steak tartare.

IF you are really concerned you can technically pasteurize the raw milk without killing most of the benefits. It takes a long time, and i don’t remember the numbers, but it’s like 140 degrees over x time or something to that nature

Hey OP for reference, this is how much raw milk costs at my local natural market in the northwest.

Raw Milk (cow) 1 gallon: $8-12
–this is all local milk

Raw Milk (goat) 1/2 gallon: $12

Pasteurized Goat Milk 1/2 gallon: $7

Do people actually milk the cows? Because that sounds like contamination waiting to happen. Sry if I misread.

Either way, if you are generally healthy person the minimal amount of harmful bacteria shouldn’t be an issue due to all the health benefits otherwise.

[quote]VTTrainer wrote:

[quote]Elegua360 wrote:

So…it tastes great, and seems to have a better nutrient profile, but it is a known vector for food poisoning bacteria.[/quote]

The same with all food, they all are breeding grounds for bacteria. Thanks for pointing out the obvious.

[/quote]

Don’t be an infant.

In the early 20th century, infections borne directly from raw milk were one of the most common forms of fatal food poisoning – because it comes out of the cow warm, leaving more opportunity for bacterial growth, and goes into a container that’s rarely well-disinfected.

The OP would face the exact same risks. It’s a low risk, but one that does have to be addressed directly.

To NOT point the fact that it is a greater infection risk than ‘all food’ is insipid.

…incidentally, I drink raw milk myself, from a local dairy (though I don’t milk it myself). Most often, I make kefir out of it, which introduces beneficial bacteria and yeast, consuming most of the lactase. Food poisoning is reduced to close to nil because harmful bacteria are removed by the competing bacteria/yeast culture.

I think if raw milk was too much of a danger, John Meadows would never recommend it.

I have never experienced ANY negative side effects from raw milk. Actually it makes me stronger and my muscles feel like increased density.

The groups of people that need to be careful are young, old, and immuno compromised individuals.

[quote]Ct. Rockula wrote:
A dude at my gym lets people milk his cows for 10 bucks a months plus a per gallon fee.
[/quote]

There is some kind of joke in that line but its almost too easy Ct :wink:

Seriously though, how does one approach another gym goer w/that line? Kind of like a farmer fantasy camp or something, is this what goes down in Tennessee?

[quote]Elegua360 wrote:

[quote]VTTrainer wrote:

[quote]Elegua360 wrote:

So…it tastes great, and seems to have a better nutrient profile, but it is a known vector for food poisoning bacteria.[/quote]

The same with all food, they all are breeding grounds for bacteria. Thanks for pointing out the obvious.

[/quote]

Don’t be an infant.

In the early 20th century, infections borne directly from raw milk were one of the most common forms of fatal food poisoning – because it comes out of the cow warm, leaving more opportunity for bacterial growth, and goes into a container that’s rarely well-disinfected.

The OP would face the exact same risks. It’s a low risk, but one that does have to be addressed directly.

To NOT point the fact that it is a greater infection risk than ‘all food’ is insipid.

…incidentally, I drink raw milk myself, from a local dairy (though I don’t milk it myself). Most often, I make kefir out of it, which introduces beneficial bacteria and yeast, consuming most of the lactase. Food poisoning is reduced to close to nil because harmful bacteria are removed by the competing bacteria/yeast culture.[/quote]

I did the same thing when I had kefir grains; if anyone’s worried about getting sick you could brew some kefir out of the raw milk.

I have been meaning to try raw milk for a while and this thread pushed me over the edge, drank a half gallon in 2 days. Pasteurized milk sits ok with me, but is a bit heavy in the stomach. The raw milk gave me absolutely no heavy feeling in the stomach whatsover. It also tasted better. Definitely getting more. I might try drinking a half gallon a day next time, but it’s a bit pricey where I have access to it. The again, it’s only about $2 more per half gallon than organic whole mik.