T Nation

Raw Eggs


#1

After reading several topics about eggs around here and about the danger of cooked oil, I have become interested in eating eggs raw. I'm not worried about samonella as I only buy good quality eggs (organic, free-range, with extra omega-3 content) and always eat them long before their expiration date. However, after trying to eat one raw, I quickly discovered that it tastes nothing like a cooked egg. More like flavored snot. Has anyone found any good ways of eating raw eggs? Does it taste better if blended it in to a protein drink or mixed in to some type of food? Any ideas?


#2

You really can't taste it, if you put it blended together with Milk.

If I am in a hurry in the morning and need some protein and carb hit, I just pour half of a glass (about 5 egg whites) and the other half skim milk and slam it back. It doesn't taste bad at all. I know alot of people are going to flame me for drinking milk, but I for one love it and don't have one problem with it. Yes, it may be high II or Hig GI, but whatever the case maybe, this is an effective and time efficient way to get rocking in the morning while maximizing sleep and still showing up for work on time.

So, just throw the raw egg in there or with something else and your golden. You won't taste it at all.

Hope that helps,

T


#3

It's advisable that one cooks an egg. The main reason besides possible sickness is that the heat de-natures the egg protein somewhat, and in this case thats a good thing as we can't fully digest eggs in their natural state. So by simply cooking them one can effectively double the amount of usable protein in an egg! If your reasons for wanting to eat raw eggs is for conveinience then try hard-boiling them, that way their portible.


#4

I have mixed raw eggs with chocolate-flavored protein powder and milk. It was probably too much protein for one sitting, but it was a great-tasting protein shake and very rich consistency.


#5

As someone already mentioned, you 'lose' about half the protein if you don't cook them. It was Berardi who wrote about this for T-Nation. Cook your eggs.


#6

A long time ago I ate raw eggs. One time I even ate 12 raw eggs unmixed and by themselves. I almost gaged on the chalaza but got it all down. (Chalaza is the ropey strands of egg white which anchor the yolk in place in the center of the egg white.)

I found mixing raw eggs to be much easier to deal with.

I later switched to pasturized liquid eggs. I would consume both the whole eggs and the egg white varieties. They had about 50 grams of protein per container.

I was consuming raw egg whites at breakfast and whole raw eggs before bed. I no longer eat raw eggs. I drank some bad eggs...nasty. I also got depression.

A t-mag article refered to Berardi finding an article that said only 1/2 the protein of raw eggs is absorbed. I actually found that article via the internet. I also found a later article that said only 35% of the raw egg protein is not absorbed. The testing process required the ethics committee to approve (do not ask how they tested... probes ect...).

I found the real problem is that the raw eggs have a glycoprotein (avidin) that binds biotin. This means that L-triptophan is converted to biotin instead of going down the seratonin pathway. Lack of seratonin will give you clinical depression. You can take biotin pills. Another t-mag article said you need to take biotin about 16 hrs post raw egg consumption. I took biotin with the raw eggs and it did not help (16 hr problem).

tall tom


#7

I had no idea that part of the egg was not absorbed if eaten raw. My main concern in cooking the egg was the possible problems that would be caused by oxidized oil. I usually buy Egglands or similar eggs which has higher levels of omega-3 primarily derived from flaxseed oil. Since some recent topics talked about the danger of oxidized oil, raw eggs seemed the way to go. But now maybe not.

Does hardboiling the egg destroy the omega-3 content of these eggs? Would soft boiling or poaching be better? Or how about just eating the yolk raw and cooking the rest since the biotin binding portion of the egg is in the white (if I'm not mistaken)? What effect would this have on protein absortion?


#8

First of all, not all oils are going to kill you just because they're heated. A little olive oil that's been cooked isn't going to hurt you.

Secondly. . . why are you using oil? Eggs require very little, if any, oil to cook. Just make sure you preheat the pan that you're cooking them in really well, so that they start cooking the instant the eggs touch the pan, and they won't really stick much.

If that's still too much sticking for you, get some Pam-style olive oil spray, heat up the pan really well, give it a very quick spray, then drop your eggs in.

For reasons other posters have mentioned (both protein digestion, and health reasons), you're better off cooking them.