T Nation

Raw Eggs or Cooked

I’ve come to enjoy the ease of raw eggs recently and I am unfortunately too busy as of late to research this question on my own.

Which is better for protein/nutrient absorption, raw eggs or cooked eggs? I’ve heard differing opinions and I’m wondering if anyone could shed some light on the subject.

I just don’t want to be short changing myself due to convenience.

Thanks.

-DTC

Hi there DTC,
Personally I always cook my eggs as I am always worried about the possibility of Salmonella, although the risk is quite low and not really an issue if using pasteurized eggs.
Protein absorption is higher in cooked eggs than in raw eggs, and this discrepancy is higher still if solely focusing on egg whites.

Most times when cooking we damage the nutrients within (there are exceptions- lycopene is one that becomes more bioavailable) so yes, nutrient absorption may be lower in cooked eggs, another good reason to eat your veggies.
Finally raw eggs contain the protein Avidin that binds to Biotin, which is necessary for the metabolism of carbohydrate, protein and fatty acids (quite an important vitamin). Cooking denatures the Avidin allowing Biotin to be absorbed, although this only really becomes a problem with high amounts of raw eggs or usage for a prolonged period. Still weighing up the pros and cons I would go the cooked route.

Hope this helps,
Dazza

I’ve heard that the egg white is better cooked and the yolk raw and it happens that you get pretty close to that with super runny eggs over easy.

Alright great, thanks for the info guys.

[quote]Dazza wrote:
Hi there DTC,
Personally I always cook my eggs as I am always worried about the possibility of Salmonella, although the risk is quite low and not really an issue if using pasteurized eggs.
Protein absorption is higher in cooked eggs than in raw eggs, and this discrepancy is higher still if solely focusing on egg whites.

Most times when cooking we damage the nutrients within (there are exceptions- lycopene is one that becomes more bioavailable) so yes, nutrient absorption may be lower in cooked eggs, another good reason to eat your veggies.
Finally raw eggs contain the protein Avidin that binds to Biotin, which is necessary for the metabolism of carbohydrate, protein and fatty acids (quite an important vitamin). Cooking denatures the Avidin allowing Biotin to be absorbed, although this only really becomes a problem with high amounts of raw eggs or usage for a prolonged period. Still weighing up the pros and cons I would go the cooked route.

Hope this helps,
Dazza
[/quote]

There is not enough biotin in an egg yolk to bind to all the avidin present in the raw whites. 5.7 grams of biotin are required to neutralize all the avidin found in the raw whites of an average-sized egg. There are only about 25 micrograms of biotin in an average egg yolk.
Even if this were true, this would be impossible due to the amount of biotin in the food that many of us eat every day.

Raw egg yolks are absorbed quite well by the body. Egg whites, however, aren’t absorbed as well as the yolk.
But if you’re eating the egg as whole, there should be no problem, because you’re eating the yolk with it.

As far as Salmonella poisoning goes, it is assumed that 1 in every 30,000 eggs are infected with Salmonella. These are regular eggs. If you’re buying organic eggs, or free-range/organic eggs from a farmer that you personally know, this shouldn’t be a problem.

I see this discussion a lot, and I just think it comes down to personal preferences. There are pros/cons for both sides of the argument, but one side isn’t better by a good amount. I prefer them raw with a packet or 2 of splenda added. It tastes like a super creamy vanilla shake.

I eat 12 raw eggs every day. No problems. Fast and easy.

I’m thinking about boiling eggs at home to take to work for lunch, obviously with other stuff, not on their own. How long will they keep in the fridge after being boiled?

Sarps