T Nation

Ratio of Single Leg to 2 Legged Exercises

If I was deadlifting 100kg, how much weight should I be able to lift for the single leg deadlift ? Same question for squat

Also suppose I am doing dumbell presses using 2 arms at the same time. How much weight can I use do it one arm at a time ?

i’m pretty sure that when you deadlift 100kg, you should not be worrying about that.

i had to say this sorry, i don’t know the answer to your question though i am a little iterested too.

[quote]teotjunk wrote:
If I was deadlifting 100kg, how much weight should I be able to lift for the single leg deadlift ? Same question for squat

Also suppose I am doing dumbell presses using 2 arms at the same time. How much weight can I use do it one arm at a time ?[/quote]
How long would it take to try it? There really is no formula. I would suspect that if you have never done single leg movements, you will have to start very light to build the balance and coordination. Also, there are different techniques for single legged movements so it will make a difference which you choose.

[quote]Xanes wrote:
i’m pretty sure that when you deadlift 100kg, you should not be worrying about that.

i had to say this sorry, i don’t know the answer to your question though i am a little iterested too.[/quote]

this. as a beginner you really don’t need to worry about single leg work at all.

This is a pretty cool question! I’m embarrassed that I misplaced the info for this but i know it’s in the NSCA book somewhere…

Anyways, when you add up the sum of each individual legs strength output they do NOT equal the strength output of both legs put together. Ex: You DL 100kg, but that doesn’t mean that a 1 leg deadlift on each side would summate to 100kg. The embarassing part is that i forget which is stronger: both legs together, or the sum of both legs individually. Can’t seem to google it either.

Now here’s the problem: the above works for leg extension, or curl etc…the DL is a whole different animal. Your 1 leg DL (like Silyak said) will be heavily dependent on your balance. There is no current equation for it (not even a prediction equation) because there are just too many factors!

-Center of gravity
-Weight
-Balance
-Core strength
-Distribution of strength throughout active muscles
-Muscle spindle activity.

Basically do what Silyak said and give it a shot! Worst case scenario you get a good workout…

Also, maybe OP said 100kg because they thought it would facilitate the calculations or give a more rounded answer to their question. Benefit of the doubt.