T Nation

Radiology Technologist

I have been thinking about going to school for this and was curious if anyone on T-Nation currently worked in this profession and could provide some feedback. Thanks.

I can’t tell you too much, but my mother has been a rad. tech. for as long as I can remember. Even when the hospital she worked for shut down she wasn’t out of work for long. More importantly, she genuinely enjoys her work.

It’s an interesting time in the field too, since a lot of facilities are switching from film to digital.

I don’t know the correct terminology, but don’t overlook MRIs either. X-ray/mamo isn’t going to disappear, but MR is a growing field.

(On a slight tangent, the carryover between my interest in film photography and her career in film X-ray/mamo is surprising. We can have conversations she can’t have with anyone else outside of the hospital.)

[quote]MikeyKBiatch wrote:
I have been thinking about going to school for this and was curious if anyone on T-Nation currently worked in this profession and could provide some feedback. Thanks.[/quote]

I used to work as a Rad Tech, CT Tech, and most recently as an MRI Tech. Even though I’m not currently working in the field, I have maintained my license.

MRI is definitely a fascinating profession, and very rewarding. CT can be exciting if you work in a trauma center/hospital. Radiology was fun for a while, but I was happiest when I moved onto MRI.

Let me know if you have specific questions I can help with.

Thanks for the responses. It definetely sounds like a rewarding field to get into. How much schooling do most go through? I thought it was mainly a batchelors degree but ive seen a few associate degree programs also.

[quote]MikeyKBiatch wrote:
Thanks for the responses. It definetely sounds like a rewarding field to get into. How much schooling do most go through? I thought it was mainly a batchelors degree but ive seen a few associate degree programs also. [/quote]

Most radiology programs are 1-4 years, and you can earn a certificate or an associates or bachelor’s degree, depending on the school you attend.

After you complete the program, you can then specialize in MRI, CT, ultrasound, mammography, cardiovascular, nuclear med, etc. Some hospitals have programs you need to apply for the advanced training, and others will provide on the job training for motivated, hard working rad techs.

Here’s a link with a little more info: http://ccc.byu.edu/clic/Radiology.pdf

Hope that helps.

[quote]Mod Laurie wrote:
MikeyKBiatch wrote:
Thanks for the responses. It definetely sounds like a rewarding field to get into. How much schooling do most go through? I thought it was mainly a batchelors degree but ive seen a few associate degree programs also.

Most radiology programs are 1-4 years, and you can earn a certificate or an associates or bachelor’s degree, depending on the school you attend.

After you complete the program, you can then specialize in MRI, CT, ultrasound, mammography, cardiovascular, nuclear med, etc. Some hospitals have programs you need to apply for the advanced training, and others will provide on the job training for motivated, hard working rad techs.

Here’s a link with a little more info: http://ccc.byu.edu/clic/Radiology.pdf

Hope that helps. [/quote]

That helps a lot, thanks.