T Nation

Rack Pulls are Awesome!

[quote]timmyboy5410 wrote:
Sir wrote:
If you’re not doing 400lbs+ you don’t need straps.

I think the weight that they are pulling is irrelevent. If their grip is giving out before the targeted muscle group is, then what would it hurt? If they cut their workout short because they can’t hang onto the bar, then they are short-changing themselves.

Like I said before, pull as much weight as you can until your grip gives out, then use the straps. It is a good idea to do additional grip strength exercises as well.[/quote]

I agree. Quitting just because your grip gives out will not allow you to get the most out of your deadlifting, unless of course you are deadlifting solely for grip strength, which I doubt anybody does.

I just skimmed but didn’t see it mentioned, are the guys that are having grip problems using chalk? I was having grip problems pulling 275 but since I was introduced to chalk I haven’t even thought about my grip.

Use chalk, lots of chalk, if you can’t use chalk at your gym find a different gym.

learn to “set” the bar in your hands right, like deep in the palm, than squeeze the shit out of it.

Do farmers walks, not only will they improve your grip but they will build up your upper back, traps, and forearms as well.

Do rack pulls near as heavy as you can and do a 10 second hold at the top.

Your grip failing on a DL is more supportive grip than crushing grip. Grippers and such WILL help but farmers walks and holds should be of more benefit.

[quote]Trenchant wrote:
schultzie wrote:
are rack pulls good for people who have trouble off the floor? im having issues with that as well as grip, and my 1rm is only about 330

I’d like to know this, too. I’m having trouble w/ my grip and getting it up. I feel that I can work my back more, but my hands give out and then if I rest/pause, I can’t get the weight back up.[/quote]

Me too. I hope rack pulls do help, although I think it doesn’t since it doesn’t train the weak bottom ROM. Still, handling supramaximal weights can actually help.

[quote]FightingScott wrote:
Sir wrote:
If you’re not doing 400lbs+ you don’t need straps.

If you’re not pulling more than 1,000 you don’t NEED straps.
The alternating grip is pretty effective.

But doing Deadlifts double-overhand is a safer position for the shoulders. [/quote]

I use an alternating grip, as the bar tends to roll out of one hand, it tightens in the other, but I’m interested in your comments about double overhand and the relationship to the shoulder.

I have some pain in the left anterior delt area after doing some rack pulls at 396lbs. I didn’t consider it may be caused by the grip - can you elaborate please?

BTW - how low do you guys start your rack pulls?

IF youre using a mixed grip for DL’s/rack pulls, be careful to cycle it through the workout. You can create some imbalace, particularly in your lats and obliques if you use the same grip for an extended period.

[quote]beebuddy wrote:

Really, I thought they were better for locking out. I’m certainly no authority though. In your opinion, what is a good exercise for blasting your lock-out strength?[/quote]

Good for Lockout:
Deficit Deadlifts (you hold the bar longer so your get more grip work)
Rack Lockouts (They make you strong)
Double Overhand Strapless Shrugs (Grip and Upper Back Strength)
Kroc Dumbbell Rows
Pendlay Barbell Rows
45’ Hypers
All sorts of DE Deadlifts.

gotta say thanks for the imput guys. I’ll definately be using chalk and implementing farmers walks more often. I have a thick bar at my gym, but I’m wondering, should I do the thick bar exclusively for a period of time. As a few people mentioned, I don’t want to short change my back development just because I can’t hold onto the bar, and the thickbar (or towel wrapped bar) will make it even harder. Thoughts?

Rack pulls are a great way for me to increase my normal from-the-floor DL. I’m great off-the-floor, but that knee to lockout is my weaker area. I’ve got a 520 lb deadlift at 178 lbs at 5’8, but I love doing rack pulls with around 460-475 lbs for reps a lot higher than I could from the floor.

Doing that brought me up from a 500 to a 520 dead, and it didn’t take very long.

i dont use any straps but when i start losing grip i just switch my grips around, it helps a lot, i also like to make sure i wipe my hands w/ my shirt before i go to get as much sweat off as i can since i dont use any chalk either.

[quote]Trenchant wrote:
gotta say thanks for the imput guys. I’ll definately be using chalk and implementing farmers walks more often. I have a thick bar at my gym, but I’m wondering, should I do the thick bar exclusively for a period of time. As a few people mentioned, I don’t want to short change my back development just because I can’t hold onto the bar, and the thickbar (or towel wrapped bar) will make it even harder. Thoughts?
[/quote]

I wouldn’t say use it exclusively, If your grip fails you, use straps on the thick bar/switch to a standard bar and do a high rep set of deadlifts with a weight you can do double overhand on the thick bar (it won’t be heavy) or hold it for time double overhand.

You can do the same with a mixed grip as well.

Another thing about thick bars is they usually have a lot less flex in them than a standard bar so you might be a bit weaker off the floor using one.

I also like to do all my exercises with a thick bar,

reverse curls with a thick bar are HARD on the grip, along with

Upright rows, clean varations, rows, upright rows, shrugs, etc.