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Questions About Rest/Pause Routine

Hey, I’m a newbie to this site. I’m 24 years old, 6 foot 172 lbs, 18-20% bodyfat. My goal EVENTUALLY would be to get 180-185lbs with 10-12 % bf. Atleast thats my primary goal.

After lifting for 6 years, I’ve come to grips that I cant gain muscle and lose fat at the same time, so I’m going to try this Rest/Pause routine to gain some mass. So this is the routine.

Monday/Thurs
Bench
Dumbell rows
Dumbell biceps curls

Tues/ Fri
Pullups
Military Press
Tris

Im going to do the whole 1 rep thing at my max weight, rest 1min and complete 10 reps for each exercise. As I progress, I am going to cut down my rest time to 10-15 seconds.

Now maybe some people who have had experience with this or are just knowledgable about it can give me some advice. Do I just do 1 exercise per muscle group on that day? How often do I do abs. I don’t want to gain any fat, so can I do cardio with this routine.

And if I do cardio, when is the best time to do it, how long should I run and how often. How long should I continue to do this routine? Some people say 8 weeks, others say 5. I appreciate any advice on this and I apologize if I wrote this in the wrong section…

Too many questions to answer right now, it’s late someone else will answer those, what I will say…where’s the legs. You have a reason for not working legs, I’d say take out curls and triceps and put in deadlifts and squats, but my guess is you won’t like that.

[quote]muimuiman wrote:
Hey, I’m a newbie to this site. I’m 24 years old, 6 foot 172 lbs, 18-20% bodyfat. My goal EVENTUALLY would be to get 180-185lbs with 10-12 % bf. Atleast thats my primary goal.
[/quote]

What was your starting weight? What is your diet like?

Hey man, not trying to sound like a dick, but if this is the best workout that you can come up with after 6 years of training, then switching to rest/pause would be way down the list of suggestions that I’d make to you.

PF already mentioned lower body training, which your routine has absolutely none of. That’s red flag number one around here. Unless you’ve got some sort of physical impairment that is forcing you not to train your lower body, then I could understand. Otherwise, START TRAINING YOUR LEGS!

Once again, your understanding of how to correctly train needs work, leave the advanced training techniques for later when you actually need them. Right now, all you need to do to see improvement is to start training right, eat like you are trying to gain weight (more on that later) and rest enough to allow your body to recover.

What you are describing is also not rest/pause, that would be 10 singles (which quite honestly you could not do with a 1 minute rest) and then using a density progression. I could describe what rest/pause is to you, but once again you don’t need it, so I’m not going to atm.

Red flag number 2. Sorry to break it to you, but you WILL gain some body fat whenever you gain muscle. Now you can minimize it through the use of a good diet and cardio, but you’ll still gain fat. And if you want to gain at the fastest rate possible, then fat should not be your concern.

[quote]
And if I do cardio, when is the best time to do it, how long should I run and how often. How long should I continue to do this routine? Some people say 8 weeks, others say 5. I appreciate any advice on this and I apologize if I wrote this in the wrong section. [/quote]

As for cardio, there are some different schools of thought on when it’s “best” to do. Early morning “fasted” cardio is very popular among certain populations of lifters and is proven to work. After resistance training is also another good option. Or, you could do it on your off days from lifting. Just don’t do it before you train with weights.

It’s impossible for us to tell you how long you should run as none of us know you or your current fitness level. Instead I’d suggest doing steady state cardio (jogging, swimming, biking, etc… at a constant pace) for at least 20 minutes and probably no longer than an hour (shoot for around 30 minutes to start). However far you get in that time is how long you should run/bike/swim/etc…

As far as the routine, I’d suggest that you don’t do it at all. You’d be better off with “Starting Strength” by Mark Ripptoe, as it will teach you how to correctly perform the big lower body exercises (deadlifts/squats/and power cleans)and is built around progression.

After that you could try a “5x5” program, or switch to a more “bodybuilding” focused program (like an Upper/Lower or Push/Pull split).

I know this probably isn’t what you want to hear, but it’s what you need to hear.

[quote]Sentoguy wrote:
muimuiman wrote:
Hey, I’m a newbie to this site. I’m 24 years old, 6 foot 172 lbs, 18-20% bodyfat. My goal EVENTUALLY would be to get 180-185lbs with 10-12 % bf. Atleast thats my primary goal.

What was your starting weight? What is your diet like?

After lifting for 6 years, I’ve come to grips that I cant gain muscle and lose fat at the same time, so I’m going to try this Rest/Pause routine to gain some mass. So this is the routine.

Monday/Thurs
Bench
Dumbell rows
Dumbell biceps curls

Tues/ Fri
Pullups
Military Press
Tris

Hey man, not trying to sound like a dick, but if this is the best workout that you can come up with after 6 years of training, then switching to rest/pause would be way down the list of suggestions that I’d make to you.

PF already mentioned lower body training, which your routine has absolutely none of. That’s red flag number one around here. Unless you’ve got some sort of physical impairment that is forcing you not to train your lower body, then I could understand. Otherwise, START TRAINING YOUR LEGS!

Im going to do the whole 1 rep thing at my max weight, rest 1min and complete 10 reps for each exercise. As I progress, I am going to cut down my rest time to 10-15 seconds.

Once again, your understanding of how to correctly train needs work, leave the advanced training techniques for later when you actually need them. Right now, all you need to do to see improvement is to start training right, eat like you are trying to gain weight (more on that later) and rest enough to allow your body to recover.

What you are describing is also not rest/pause, that would be 10 singles (which quite honestly you could not do with a 1 minute rest) and then using a density progression. I could describe what rest/pause is to you, but once again you don’t need it, so I’m not going to atm.

Now maybe some people who have had experience with this or are just knowledgable about it can give me some advice. Do I just do 1 exercise per muscle group on that day? How often do I do abs. I don’t want to gain any fat, so can I do cardio with this routine.

Red flag number 2. Sorry to break it to you, but you WILL gain some body fat whenever you gain muscle. Now you can minimize it through the use of a good diet and cardio, but you’ll still gain fat. And if you want to gain at the fastest rate possible, then fat should not be your concern.

And if I do cardio, when is the best time to do it, how long should I run and how often. How long should I continue to do this routine? Some people say 8 weeks, others say 5. I appreciate any advice on this and I apologize if I wrote this in the wrong section.

As for cardio, there are some different schools of thought on when it’s “best” to do. Early morning “fasted” cardio is very popular among certain populations of lifters and is proven to work. After resistance training is also another good option. Or, you could do it on your off days from lifting. Just don’t do it before you train with weights.

It’s impossible for us to tell you how long you should run as none of us know you or your current fitness level. Instead I’d suggest doing steady state cardio (jogging, swimming, biking, etc… at a constant pace) for at least 20 minutes and probably no longer than an hour (shoot for around 30 minutes to start). However far you get in that time is how long you should run/bike/swim/etc…

As far as the routine, I’d suggest that you don’t do it at all. You’d be better off with “Starting Strength” by Mark Ripptoe, as it will teach you how to correctly perform the big lower body exercises (deadlifts/squats/and power cleans)and is built around progression.

After that you could try a “5x5” program, or switch to a more “bodybuilding” focused program (like an Upper/Lower or Push/Pull split).

I know this probably isn’t what you want to hear, but it’s what you need to hear.[/quote]

Excellent reply, sento.

My bad, must have been in a rush. I would be doing squats on tues/fri also. I’m not an idiot, just forgot to include that. As far as starting weight, 6 years ago when I began I weighed 145 lbs. Went to college, lifted alot, took creatine, did all the strength training programs and I got big. Got up to about 180 lbs. But about 2 and a half years ago I stopped lifting, and would go out drinking alot. I gained a lot of weight and ended up being downright fat. So I decided to lose the weight by doing the standard 3 set 10 reps workouts and alot of cardio. So I’ve been doing that since then but I definitely feel like Im in a rut now.

You probably still think I shouldnt do the Rest/Pause, but I think I have an idea of how to train correctly. But since my goal is to lose fat as well, should I do a fat loss program first, or put on the mass? And since that wasn’t rest/pause, could you explain what it is?

I also posted some pics in the Rate my Physique section just incase someone wants to see that, it may help if you decided to give me advice.

I’ve only done one style of rest/pause training and it went like this. I pick a weight I feel I can get out maybe 6-8 times, depending on the athlete it’d prolly differ. For me I started with deadlifts, first leg of the set I did 5 reps, then I rested 10-12 seconds and did 4 reps, rested another 10-12 seconds and did 3 reps, kept doing that till I did a single and that was set #1.

15 reps with a weight you can only do maybe 8 reps straight, that killed me it was awesome but I’m sure there are other forms of rest pause training, that’s just the one I am most familiar with. And I saw your pics, considering how you look now and you DON’T want to gain any fat all all, pick a weight loss program but even more important have your diet completely in check for that goal.

[quote]muimuiman wrote:
You probably still think I shouldnt do the Rest/Pause, but I think I have an idea of how to train correctly. But since my goal is to lose fat as well, should I do a fat loss program first, or put on the mass? And since that wasn’t rest/pause, could you explain what it is?[/quote]

the simplest rest-pause technique is just to take a short pause…3-6 seconds or so… between each rep. just enough to take a breath and to get your muscles out of tension for a second. this allows you to do 7 or so reps of a weight that you could usually do 2 or 3 of.

it’s tough to do rest-pause with bench press, unless you pause at the bottom of the rep (don’t re-rack the weight in between each set for your pause… it will no longer be a bench press that you are working).

for most other exercises you can completely finish a rep and then pause before the next one (deadlift, squat, pullup, pushup, etc.). for dips, for example, you can probably get off the bars in between reps… but just for a VERY short breather…

dan

Mike Mahler wrote an excellent article about a very simple rest-pause program, four wourkouts a week, basic exercices, etc…It didn’t look too advanced. Why don’t you check the author list?

Anyway, rest-pause isn’t the best fat loss program…Read “Waterbury Summer Project” or “10x3 For Fat Loss”, you may get some inspiration!

Bye ! ! !