T Nation

Question on Managing Hypothyroidism


#1

so, i've been hypothyroid for about 8 years... taking synthroid the whole time, as well (50 mcg/day).

i recently switched docs, and he's gonna do a full thyroid panel, which i fought to get for years.

^with that being said, why would a doc ever use a TSH test for a patient that they know is hypothyroid and taking medication? wouldn't that be like using a LH/FSH test to diagnose one's testosterone levels?


#2

Some docs will check TSH and then think that if its normal range - problem solved.
So docs thing that near TSH=1.0, but many feel hypo unless TSH is pushed very low.

Body temperature is the best measure of overall thyroid function. One can use body temperature as a dosing guide.
Oral 98.8 when you first wake up and near 98.6 during the afternoon.

Some do not convert T4–>T3 adequately and need to take T3 to feel well.

Read and maybe weep: http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/

More on thyroid here in ‘thyroid basics’ sticky.

Also see ‘advice for new guys’

You use iodized salt now? Were you using iodized salt prior to your thyroid problems?


#3

[quote]KSman wrote:
Some docs will check TSH and then think that if its normal range - problem solved.
So docs thing that near TSH=1.0, but many feel hypo unless TSH is pushed very low.

Body temperature is the best measure of overall thyroid function. One can use body temperature as a dosing guide.
Oral 98.8 when you first wake up and near 98.6 during the afternoon.

Some do not convert T4–>T3 adequately and need to take T3 to feel well.

Read and maybe weep: http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/

More on thyroid here in ‘thyroid basics’ sticky.

Also see ‘advice for new guys’

You use iodized salt now? Were you using iodized salt prior to your thyroid problems?

[/quote]

yup, i’ve read most of your threads… thanks for the info, by the way.

i don’t really use salt, in general.

i need to start tracking my temp… i have a new doc i’m hopeful will test/try more things, but if not, i have more baseline bloodwork than i ever have and will be able to manage things on my own for once…


#4

Iodine is suspected to have more roles in the body other than in the thyroid gland.

So those on thyroid meds should not assume that they can avoid iodine.


#5

[quote]KSman wrote:
Iodine is suspected to have more roles in the body other than in the thyroid gland.

So those on thyroid meds should not assume that they can avoid iodine.[/quote]

i got some liquid minerals a while back, and have put off adding them to my diet until i got more bloodwork done. i will prolly add in the iodine for now, and do another test (i have the ones where you do the “taste test” to check for deficiency) and add in whatever else i need…


#6

[quote]cycobushmaster wrote:

[quote]KSman wrote:
Iodine is suspected to have more roles in the body other than in the thyroid gland.

So those on thyroid meds should not assume that they can avoid iodine.[/quote]

i got some liquid minerals a while back, and have put off adding them to my diet until i got more bloodwork done. i will prolly add in the iodine for now, and do another test (i have the ones where you do the “taste test” to check for deficiency) and add in whatever else i need…[/quote]

FYI,

i was looking at the carton of eggs this morning, and saw that each egg has 45% of the RDA, and i eat 3 of those everyday (and have for years).

i’m still gonna check my temp like you suggested, though…


#7

That is suggested in the literature. However if chickens are given feed derived from grains produced in the “goiter belt”, there is no reason to expect that iodine levels will be adequate. If humans are iodine deficient on local crops, then animals could be too.

So this is a trusted source of information? https://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/Iodine-HealthProfessional/

In the USA, iodine is now not used universally as a teat wash in dairy barns which used to get into the milk and iodine is not longer used as a dough conditioner in bread production. BTW, iodine is now a controlled substance [licensing, accounting and traceability] because it can be used as a catalyst in some clandestine drug lab processes. So that may be a factor driving up the cost of iodine.

Remember that a large portion of human populations used to be severely iodine deficient eating local crops, eggs, meat and grains/milk produced on the same iodine deficient soils.