T Nation

Question for Prof X

Hey Prof X,
Thanks again for your words of wisdom earlier in the month (although I didn’t have pizza that weekend,I should have though lol, I am seriously rethinking some strategies to gain weight; I am running out of plate room with the increasing amounts of chicken and beef - ahh the clean bulk, so much oatmeal, not enough time). But anyways, I train more for performance (speed drumming)and not physique.

My lifts are going up but my body weight so far has been stationary, 6’1 fluctuating around the mid 170s. From what I have read, I know if I increase my weight, my lifts will go up even more and my power and speed will hopefully improve as well. In your opinion, when training for performance (I am not sure of your background or if you do as well- sports, etc) do you feel that the extra muscle would cause me to have “heavy arms” and “heavy legs” like boxers sometimes report and lose speed? I don’t buy into the big bulky myth or those drummers that tell me if I get big, I will become slow. I was just wondering on your take on the subject since you have provided T-Nation with great info. Alright, I’m bracing myself for your reactionlol…GO!

[quote]Footsolider88 wrote:
Hey Prof X,
Thanks again for your words of wisdom earlier in the month (although I didn’t have pizza that weekend,I should have though lol, I am seriously rethinking some strategies to gain weight; I am running out of plate room with the increasing amounts of chicken and beef - ahh the clean bulk, so much oatmeal, not enough time). But anyways, I train more for performance (speed drumming)and not physique.

My lifts are going up but my body weight so far has been stationary, 6’1 fluctuating around the mid 170s. From what I have read, I know if I increase my weight, my lifts will go up even more and my power and speed will hopefully improve as well. In your opinion, when training for performance (I am not sure of your background or if you do as well- sports, etc) do you feel that the extra muscle would cause me to have “heavy arms” and “heavy legs” like boxers sometimes report and lose speed? I don’t buy into the big bulky myth or those drummers that tell me if I get big, I will become slow. I was just wondering on your take on the subject since you have provided T-Nation with great info. Alright, I’m bracing myself for your reactionlol…GO![/quote]

No offense, but I think the notion that building muscle in and of itself somehow makes you slow is complete bullshit. Yes, there are limits considering it is doubtful that Ronnie Coleman’s 40 time is anywhere under 10 seconds. However, how many people are anywhere near 300lbs in contest shape? The genetics to even get close to that size are few and far between which means most of the people “worrying” about getting too big…are just pussies. In other words, if you want to get bigger and maintain your level of performance, you continue training for your sport. If your performance somehow suffers, you either allow your body to adapt to the new weight as you continue training or you drop weight. It is that simple. At 170lbs at your height, you are skinny as hell. If your weight isn’t going up, it is about time you reconsider just how “clean” you need to be eating.

Just so you know, weight training is not going to help or hurt your performance as a drummer. It’s all technique, so don’t even worry about that…train to get bigger so that you can look good drumming without a shirt.

[quote]Skrom wrote:
Just so you know, weight training is not going to help or hurt your performance as a drummer. It’s all technique, so don’t even worry about that…train to get bigger so that you can look good drumming without a shirt.[/quote]

Agreed. If being big hurt your hand skills, I would be fucked considering what I do for a living.

[quote]Professor X wrote:
If your weight isn’t going up, it is about time you reconsider just how “clean” you need to be eating.[/quote]

Bingo.

Calculate how many cals you’re actually eating. I bet its closer to a maintenance level than a bulk level.

[quote]Professor X wrote:
Skrom wrote:
Just so you know, weight training is not going to help or hurt your performance as a drummer. It’s all technique, so don’t even worry about that…train to get bigger so that you can look good drumming without a shirt.

Agreed. If being big hurt your hand skills, I would be fucked considering what I do for a living.[/quote]

You’d be fucked! What about the guy you’re working on!

[quote]TQB wrote:
Professor X wrote:
Skrom wrote:
Just so you know, weight training is not going to help or hurt your performance as a drummer. It’s all technique, so don’t even worry about that…train to get bigger so that you can look good drumming without a shirt.

Agreed. If being big hurt your hand skills, I would be fucked considering what I do for a living.

You’d be fucked! What about the guy you’re working on!
[/quote]

One patient today upon seeing me walk in the room goes, “Uh, could I have a bigger doc, please! I don’t quite feel safe.”

[quote]Kliplemet wrote:
strength training icreases muscle tone, when increased to very high levels, this may hinder relaxation to allow for maximum speed. when no muscle is present, lots of strength training will likely increase speed, at least in initial stages. strength and speed strength work must be balance for maximal running speed.[/quote]

What in the world are you talking about?

[quote]Big Jeff wrote:
Kliplemet wrote:
strength training icreases muscle tone, when increased to very high levels, this may hinder relaxation to allow for maximum speed. when no muscle is present, lots of strength training will likely increase speed, at least in initial stages. strength and speed strength work must be balance for maximal running speed.

What in the world are you talking about?[/quote]

I think he actually has a very good point.

That’s why strength work and speed work should always accompany each other, at least for those aiming to increase speed.

[quote]Professor X wrote:
One patient today upon seeing me walk in the room goes, “Uh, could I have a bigger doc, please! I don’t quite feel safe.”[/quote]

Damn Prof, what procedure were you supposed to be doing, clean & jerk of the guy’s ribcage? grin

are you a surgeon?

[quote]ProjectX wrote:
are you a surgeon?[/quote]

I hear he’s a military doctor with 3 nipples. And at night, when no one’s around, he eats his patients muscle-tissue for extra protein.

[quote]Kliplemet wrote:
strength training icreases muscle tone, when increased to very high levels, this may hinder relaxation to allow for maximum speed. when no muscle is present, lots of strength training will likely increase speed, at least in initial stages. strength and speed strength work must be balance for maximal running speed.[/quote]

He said “DRUMMING”, not “RUNNING”.

I was going to point out that your first sentence is utter bullshit, but I guess it doesn’t matter since you apparently don’t even have any idea what this thread’s about.

[quote]jtrinsey wrote:
Big Jeff wrote:
Kliplemet wrote:
strength training icreases muscle tone, when increased to very high levels, this may hinder relaxation to allow for maximum speed. when no muscle is present, lots of strength training will likely increase speed, at least in initial stages. strength and speed strength work must be balance for maximal running speed.

What in the world are you talking about?

I think he actually has a very good point.

That’s why strength work and speed work should always accompany each other, at least for those aiming to increase speed.
[/quote]

No he doesn’t. WTF does “strength training icreases muscle tone, when increased to very high levels, this may hinder relaxation to allow for maximum speed.” mean?

Strength and speed are closely interrelated, but wtf are you talking about?

Just out of curiosity: as you get stronger and bigger, do the drums get louder as you play them? :slight_smile:

[quote]Professor X wrote:
Footsolider88 wrote:
Hey Prof X,
Thanks again for your words of wisdom earlier in the month (although I didn’t have pizza that weekend,I should have though lol, I am seriously rethinking some strategies to gain weight; I am running out of plate room with the increasing amounts of chicken and beef - ahh the clean bulk, so much oatmeal, not enough time). But anyways, I train more for performance (speed drumming)and not physique.

My lifts are going up but my body weight so far has been stationary, 6’1 fluctuating around the mid 170s. From what I have read, I know if I increase my weight, my lifts will go up even more and my power and speed will hopefully improve as well. In your opinion, when training for performance (I am not sure of your background or if you do as well- sports, etc) do you feel that the extra muscle would cause me to have “heavy arms” and “heavy legs” like boxers sometimes report and lose speed? I don’t buy into the big bulky myth or those drummers that tell me if I get big, I will become slow. I was just wondering on your take on the subject since you have provided T-Nation with great info. Alright, I’m bracing myself for your reactionlol…GO!

No offense, but I think the notion that building muscle in and of itself somehow makes you slow is complete bullshit. Yes, there are limits considering it is doubtful that Ronnie Coleman’s 40 time is anywhere under 10 seconds. However, how many people are anywhere near 300lbs in contest shape? The genetics to even get close to that size are few and far between which means most of the people “worrying” about getting too big…are just pussies. In other words, if you want to get bigger and maintain your level of performance, you continue training for your sport. If your performance somehow suffers, you either allow your body to adapt to the new weight as you continue training or you drop weight. It is that simple. At 170lbs at your height, you are skinny as hell. If your weight isn’t going up, it is about time you reconsider just how “clean” you need to be eating.[/quote]

 Thank you so much for the reply. I didn't expect so many others to chime in as well but their responses were interesting and helpful as well. I guess my main concern was always maintaining hand and foot speed while lifting heavy (I do a modified westside approach with max days and dynamic days - I like the principles behind this plan and I feel that drumming requires many muscles groups to work at the same time which is my reason for using it). I dislike the term functional training because as as long as I make sure to practice drums, I know this will make me better. 

I realize that supplementing drumming with weights and other activities (interval runs etc)is not something many drummers do but I know it can help; whenever I mention to other drummers “…yeah I use the westside approach” they don’t know what the heck I’m talking about lol. I know some musicians can be notorious for wanting to look good on stage and couldn’t care less how they play lol but I want the training to carry over and if I look good doing it that’s cool but not something I’m worried about. Always a pleasure hearing from ya and I will work on unskinnying myself over the summer (responsibly though).

[quote]Kliplemet wrote:
strength training icreases muscle tone, when increased to very high levels, this may hinder relaxation to allow for maximum speed. when no muscle is present, lots of strength training will likely increase speed, at least in initial stages. strength and speed strength work must be balance for maximal running speed.[/quote]

WTF?

[quote]wressler125 wrote:
jtrinsey wrote:
Big Jeff wrote:
Kliplemet wrote:
strength training icreases muscle tone, when increased to very high levels, this may hinder relaxation to allow for maximum speed. when no muscle is present, lots of strength training will likely increase speed, at least in initial stages. strength and speed strength work must be balance for maximal running speed.

What in the world are you talking about?

I think he actually has a very good point.

That’s why strength work and speed work should always accompany each other, at least for those aiming to increase speed.

No he doesn’t. WTF does “strength training icreases muscle tone, when increased to very high levels, this may hinder relaxation to allow for maximum speed.” mean?

Strength and speed are closely interrelated, but wtf are you talking about?[/quote]

High-speed movements are all about how many times you can contract a muscle in a certain period of time. Being able to relax the muscle is critical to be able to do so.

Something like speed drumming is wayyy to the “speed” end of the continuum, even more so than the max speed portion of a sprint race.

I’m not sure why everybody is so confused…

So, what, being strong means you can’t relax your muscles? Right…

And by the way, as I said earlier, drumming has nothing to do with strength. Not even “speed drumming” (I assume he means punk or speed metal or something along those lines).

[quote]jtrinsey wrote:
wressler125 wrote:
jtrinsey wrote:
Big Jeff wrote:
Kliplemet wrote:
strength training icreases muscle tone, when increased to very high levels, this may hinder relaxation to allow for maximum speed. when no muscle is present, lots of strength training will likely increase speed, at least in initial stages. strength and speed strength work must be balance for maximal running speed.

What in the world are you talking about?

I think he actually has a very good point.

That’s why strength work and speed work should always accompany each other, at least for those aiming to increase speed.

No he doesn’t. WTF does “strength training icreases muscle tone, when increased to very high levels, this may hinder relaxation to allow for maximum speed.” mean?

Strength and speed are closely interrelated, but wtf are you talking about?

High-speed movements are all about how many times you can contract a muscle in a certain period of time. Being able to relax the muscle is critical to be able to do so.

Something like speed drumming is wayyy to the “speed” end of the continuum, even more so than the max speed portion of a sprint race.

I’m not sure why everybody is so confused…[/quote]

I understand what you’re trying to say, but you’re wrong.
Rapid arm movement has nothing to do with the ability to relax a muscle. You simply learn to alternate back and forth between opposite muscle groups.

Strength training has absolutely nothing to do with being able to drum fast. Gaining new mass in your arms for aesthetic purposes just means that you need to retrain CNS response in the new fibers. This may take some time but it’s nothing that can’t be fixed relatively quickly with conditioning. Obviously the more quickly you gain mass and the less you practice the worse your drum speed will be. If you continue progressive conditioning work you’re arm speed shouldn’t change much and may even increase slightly with some sort of intelligent progression.