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Question for MMA and like

This is a question for guys or gals who do MMA, ju-jitsu(etc) or striking stuff.

What are you guys doing when you want to increase your strength levels but not trying to increase your fat too much. I know diet is the answear but I would like to here what everyone has to offer. Thank You

Follow a low-volume, high-intensity strength program so that you gain strength and not mass. Diet will always play a key part.

Check out the Strength-Focused Mesocycle by CW. It focuses on strength, not mass. Perfect for MMA and other athletes trying to stay in a certain weight class.

You need to incorporate GPP.

A workout that might be appropriate is the one CT just mentioned in his article. “The Power Circuit” link below.

http://www.dragondoor.com/pdf/170.pdf

Moe

Check out CT’s Canadian Ascending-Descending training and search for wave loading. Also look at CT’s Newsletters. These types of programs are great for fighting/relative strength. Diet is crucial but training for an efficient nervous system is tops.

Also, some isos are great to train for fighting and shouldn’t cause hypertrophy.
3 rep/2rep/1 rep ‘waves’ are good.

Below is from CT

RELATIVE STRENGTH PRINCIPLES
Christian Thibeaudeu
To maximize relative strength (gaining strength but not body weight) I suggest:

  1. Focusing only on multijoint exercises (deadlift, squats, power clean, power snatch, push press, bench press, weighted dips, weighted chins)

  2. Keeping the reps low: between 1 and 5 if you are a man and 3-7 if you are a woman.

  3. Either use heavy weights or explosive movements. Preferably both.

  4. Minimize the eccentric (downward/negative/lowering) portion of each lift (in other words try to decrease the time under tension for each rep).

A good relative/limit strength block that I like is as follow:

Week 1: 3 x 5 (80-85% of max)

Week 2: 3 x 5 (80-85% of max), 3 x 4 (85-90% of max)

Week 3: 3/2/1/3/2/1 (90% / 95% / 100% / 92% / 97% / 102%)

Week 4: 3 x 3(85-90% of max)
To maximize relative strength (gaining strength but not body weight) I suggest:

  1. Focusing only on multijoint exercises (deadlift, squats, power clean, power snatch, push press, bench press, weighted dips, weighted chins)

  2. Keeping the reps low: between 1 and 5 if you are a man and 3-7 if you are a woman.

  3. Either use heavy weights or explosive movements.

  4. Minimize the eccentric portion of each lift (in other words try to decrease the time under tension for each rep).

A good relative/limit strength block that I like is as follow:

Week 1: 3 x 5 (80-85% of max)

Week 2: 3 x 5 (80-85% of max), 3 x 4 (85-90% of max)

Week 3: 3/2/1/3/2/1 (90% / 95% / 100% / 92% / 97% / 102%)

Week 4: 3 x 3(85-90% of max)

max intensity isometrics will be very good. I would aim for a max effort of 6-10 seconds for 3-4 sets of 3 positions. For you I recommend the deadlift iso. Pulling against pins (bar against pins) in the power rack. The three positions are:

  1. 2-3" below the knees
  2. 2-3" above the knees
  3. close to the lock out position

You can also use quasi-isometrics or isometronics: Same positions, but this time you use weights. The objective is the lift the bar off the pins (this time the bar is over the pins, while it’s under the pins for the preceding method) A FEW INCHES and hold the position for 6-10 seconds. Gradually work up to the heaviest weight you can hold for 6 seconds, so the number of sets will depend on your progression.

I also recommend 2 other exercises for your sport, namely the isometric bent over barbell row (position 1: bar against sternum, pos. 2: midway down, pos.3: 2" from being fully lowered) and isometric bench press (2" from chest, midway up, 2" from lockout).

I recommend using isos once per week, on fridays. The schedule I use with my athletes is:

Monday: Whole body eccentric emphasis
Wednesday: Whole body concentric and dynamic emphasis
Friday: Whole body isometrics

Thanks for the replys everyone. Hey scrappy do you know which issue of CT’s newslettar contained the information about iso stuff. Thanks alot