Question about Wendler's WALRUS Training

I’ve read a ton of his stuff, the guy is just awesome. I’m more into KB, Resistance band, loaded sled and vest workouts anymore than I am going into a gym. I travel for work and can throw a plate carrier and kb/bands into a travel bag. What kind of physique could I expect to gain strictly doing WALRUS training? I’m 6’2 225 and probably 18-20% bf. I really just want to lose fat and stay lean once I get there.

With good nutrition, you could expect a leaner and more musclar physique than what you currently have.

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No one can say what you’ll exactly look like. I’ve been WALRUS-ish training for the better part of a few years, circuit training with dumbbells, kettlebells, and weighed calisthenics. I say WALRUS-ish because I train similarly, with the biggest difference being I don’t train for high reps. Currently I do that twice per week and on a third lifting day I do several variations of loaded carries and prowler exercises. On off days I jog or brisk walk.

I do not look like my former bodybuilder self but I am somewhat lean and still have some muscle. You will not get a bodybuilder physique from it but you can gain some muscle and lose fat.

I do not go for high reps in this training and keep the rep range at 6-10 and train to near failure except on the last round in which I take it to failure. I do 3-5 rounds of 5 exercises.

You will gain muscle training like this, but it’s not ideal for doing so. It’s a general fitness plan.

Let me know it you have more questions.

You can check this thread and my posts there too.

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I have trained primarily this way for quite a while.

(Antiquity's Training Log: Just plugging away - #958 by antiquity)

Here’s how i looked cold in the morning. Check out my log. It’s exactly as Jim says. You’ll look fit and athletic and (if I can sound braggy) strong but obviously if top end strength or size is your goal this isn’t what you should do. Thus type of training lead me to compete in the Murph and end up with the top time at gym.

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Myea, its definetly NOT how this works.
The way you look is determined by your genetics. People with bodybuilding genetics will look like bodybuilders even if they do crossfit or just swimming. People with shit genetics will look like shit even after 10 years of bodybuilding, etc.

Are your handstand push-ups free standing or with leg support?

This sounds desperate and discouraging, but it may also be the indisputable truth. Not making the expected progress is not the same as training for 10 years and looking like garbage despite all the effort in training and nutrition.

“Shit” is subjective. You’ll look and feel infinitely better than you did without 10 years of bodybuilding. Yeah genetics make a difference but we’re all dealt different cards, and the guy with shit genetics that’s continually working hard will beat the guy with good genetics that’s doing nothing. It doesn’t matter though, you do this for you and just like we’re not all tall dark and handsome, we’re not all going to be Arnie either. Just keep improving you and don’t worry about the other noise.

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I do hand stand push ups supported with my feet against the wall. I wish I had the balance to do free standing ones.

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I know it might sound discouraging but i am really fed up with lies in this field. All the program selling, supplement pushing, now the “im only on TRT, bro” etc.
The hard truth is that the training we do determines weather or not we grow some muscle, but thats about it. People with bodybuilder genetics will look like that no matter how they train as long as they train, while people with bad genetics will look worse than those first people, even if they do everything 10 times better, harder and smarter combined.
Its like singing. We all can learn to hit the notes but if the voice does not sound good there is not much you can do - you will always still sound like you just hitting the notes better or worse.

Its not to discourage. Its to not keep people in bullshit that chosing this or that program will give them this or that kind of look.

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Can we be more honest for a minute as well, and acknowledge that the vast, vast majority of people look like absolute shit? So, you’re right, most people aren’t going to look like pro bodybuilders, but they can all absolutely look better than nearly everyone. Everybody, regardless of genetics or whatever other excuse we’re going to throw out there, can be the guy who looks best with their shirt off at the beach, or at the pool party or whatever.

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Yup.

A blocky midsection, narrow clavicles, poor muscle bellies a crappy quad sweep still looks awesome at a BMI of 25 with single digit bodyfat compared to spare tire, manboobs, cottage cheese thighs at BMI 40.

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Probably live longer and perform better in every area of life too.

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But yeah man, even with shit genetics it doesn’t take long to look better than 90% of the people you interact with, and people WILL notice that.

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I think that can depend on your starting point. If you’re 400lbs, it’s going to take a while.

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Didn’t a Body Builder Just say he looked like a bodybuilder when he trained like a bodybuilder? And then not like a bodybuilder when he trained not like a bodybuilder?

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This would explain why i train like a Walrus.

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On the 400lbs thing - sure it’s going to take a lot longer if starting at that point but I don’t believe being 400lbs is down to genetics. You wouldn’t be beating your genetics so to speak.

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I think Thib was just mentioning this in his log as well haha

I’m pretty much on the same page as you in reference to this subject. If not, we’re definitely in the same chapter. Training, nutrition, and recovery all help a lot, but they are not the be all and end all I would like them to be. And I don’t think it only applies to bodybuilding.

I’ve seen it in physical strength as well. For example, I’ve worked with a lot of tree workers and the two of the three physically strongest guys that I have seen in this industry did not go to a gym, lift weights, or do anything outside of work that was beneficial to their health. They did everything that was detrimental to it: every drug that they could get their hands on (not the performance enhancing kind), sometimes went days without sleeping, and when they finally fell asleep, a chainsaw running wide open 10 feet from them wouldn’t wouldn’t wake them up. Most of their other nutrition came from convenience stores. The other guy I mentioned wasn’t a substance abuser and he went to bed every night, but he didn’t lift weights. All three of them could parallel park a Bandit 200 XP chipper, if it was on fairly level gravel, moving it from the ring on the end of the tongue of course.

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