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Question about the Waterbury Total Body Training

I recently started doing this: http://www.T-Nation.com/free_online_article/sports_body_training_performance/totalbody_training

It seems like a great routine. But there is something about it I don’t understand.

The author says that on your first week you should choose a weight that will bring about failure on the last rep of the last set. No prob. But then on the third workout of that week it says to do 2 sets of 15 and with (I assume) the same weight you started the week with. How is that possible? How am I supposed to heft a weight 30 times that I could barely do 15 of less than a week earlier? Do you think Mr. Waterbury means that we should lower the weight on those higher rep days? Cause if that’s the case I am pretty sure the article doesn’t say that. I just want to make sure i am doing it right…

Waterbury writes some good stuff. I think what he means is the most weight you can do for that exercise.

Let’s use the bench press as an example. Let’s say Johnny Cliche is doing this workout and for his first workout he does a 3 x 5 at 205lbs. This was the most weight he could do for that many sets and reps. Then on workout 2 Johnny does a 3 x 8 at 165lbs. Finally Johnny does the 2 x 15 at 135lbs.

The idea is that you will be using the amount of weight that will push you to your limits on each of those workouts. If you’re not sure what you can do, you’ll just have to find out. Hope this helped.

Firstly he says NEAR failure, NOT failure. I can’t say I have ever heard CW advocate training to failure. Choose a weight that you can just squeeze out, using PROPER form on the last rep of the last set.

This applies to all the workouts. So obviously when you are doing days with higher reps (like 15), you choose a LIGHTER weight. This principle applies to all the workouts.

It takes a bit of time if you’re a newbie to work out the correct weights for each set. That’s why it is essential to keep an accurate TRAINING LOG where every weight for every set is recorded and can be referred to at each session.

Good luck. I love CW’s programs and have always got value out of them.

Ok thanks fellas, that’s exactly what I wanted to know. Yeah I suspected that that was the deal, but the article didn’t say that so I just wanted to make sure.

[quote]shaun1rsa wrote:
Firstly he says NEAR failure, NOT failure. I can’t say I have ever heard CW advocate training to failure. Choose a weight that you can just squeeze out, using PROPER form on the last rep of the last set.

This applies to all the workouts. So obviously when you are doing days with higher reps (like 15), you choose a LIGHTER weight. This principle applies to all the workouts.

It takes a bit of time if you’re a newbie to work out the correct weights for each set. That’s why it is essential to keep an accurate TRAINING LOG where every weight for every set is recorded and can be referred to at each session.
[/quote]

Excellent advice man. Thank you

In fact go to this link. All the Waterbury programs are laid out for you. You just have to print them out. It’s all done for you.

http://216.17.22.84/...CW_Programs.zip

http://65.182.219.254/...%20Programs.zip

And go here too

[quote]mr popular wrote:
http://www.T-Nation.com/free_online_forum/sports_body_training_performance_bodybuilding/chad_waterbury_and_how_i_failed [/quote]

Interesting reading.
I just started so I can’t call it, but I can tell you this much: So far, this routine is thoroghly kicking my ass. lol
I swear this is the first time in my life I am literelly getting sore EVERY time I go to the gym. and I’m loving it… to me this seems like a sign that something’s going right for a change which is nice.

I have had to make a couple of small modifications, tho. I just added some external rotations and some stuff for my scapula to keep those in shape.

And then on another day I am doing a couple of extra movements for my forearms.
But that’s just personal stuff for me. It doesn’t mean the routine is flawed or anything.

[quote]mr popular wrote:


[/quote]

IME it’s organized, detailed, challenging and fun. TBT is good stuff.