T Nation

Question About Resveratrol


#1

I was doing my own research on Resveratrol online and found a very interesting interview with a Dr. David Sinclair of Harvard Medical:

"Dr. [David] Sinclair says the public needs to know more about this remarkable natural molecule and how to get more of it into their diet. It could be as simple as drinking a 5-ounce glass of red wine,preferably from pinot noir grapes grown in northern latitudes like New York, Oregon and Washington, that generally yield more resveratrol than other varieties...

Grape skins provide resveratrol, but not in an extracted form. Due to processing, grape juice provides little resveratrol. Sun-dried raisins also contain no resveratrol due to oxidation by sun rays. The same is true for resveratrol pills which are widely marketed. Their resveratrol content, extracted from the Giant Knotweed plant (also called fo-ti in Asian cultures) for use in dietary supplements, is nil. Sinclair has tested a number of brands of resveratrol pills and their resveratrol content was zero.

The resveratrol disappears soon after exposure to air during encapsulation. For now, red wine is the only reliable source of resveratrol. White wine has ten times less resveratrol."

I don't necessarily believe everything I read but I would like to know your reply to his stating "resveratrol content...for use in dietary supplements, is nil." Followed by a brief discussion of why, what have YOU and your company done differently to prevent this?


#2

[quote]rholdnr wrote:
I was doing my own research on Resveratrol online and found a very interesting interview with a Dr. David Sinclair of Harvard Medical:

"Dr. [David] Sinclair says the public needs to know more about this remarkable natural molecule and how to get more of it into their diet. It could be as simple as drinking a 5-ounce glass of red wine,preferably from pinot noir grapes grown in northern latitudes like New York, Oregon and Washington, that generally yield more resveratrol than other varieties…

Grape skins provide resveratrol, but not in an extracted form. Due to processing, grape juice provides little resveratrol. Sun-dried raisins also contain no resveratrol due to oxidation by sun rays. The same is true for resveratrol pills which are widely marketed. Their resveratrol content, extracted from the Giant Knotweed plant (also called fo-ti in Asian cultures) for use in dietary supplements, is nil. Sinclair has tested a number of brands of resveratrol pills and their resveratrol content was zero.

The resveratrol disappears soon after exposure to air during encapsulation. For now, red wine is the only reliable source of resveratrol. White wine has ten times less resveratrol."

I don’t necessarily believe everything I read but I would like to know your reply to his stating “resveratrol content…for use in dietary supplements, is nil.” Followed by a brief discussion of why, what have YOU and your company done differently to prevent this?[/quote]

Our resveratrol (REZ-V) is contained in a LIQUID delivery system.

It’s a pharmaceutical composition comprising: ethyl 3-[(2-{[4-(hexyloxycarbonylaminoiminomethyl)phenylamino]methyl}-1-methyl-1H-benzimidazole-5-carbonyl)pyridin-2-ylamino] which is lipophilic liquid carrier system.

The gel also increases absorption approximately 30% or more.

And we also test each production run.

BTW, anybody catch the 60 Minutes segment on resveratrol?

Pretty cool:

http://vodpod.com/watch/1312846-resveratrol-60-minutes-12509


#3

LOL, I knew calling you guys out would get me a prompt reply. Very good information, thank you, TC, I think I’m satisfied.