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Question About HIT Working Sets

I dont know if it really would be classified as HIT, but im following a plan that is similar to Jason Ferrugia’s workout. The basic premise of everything is only 2 sets per exercise, in the 5-10 rep range, and always shooting for a PR.

I may do one warm-up set, and then jump into things. As far as working sets go, I have a few questions.

1.) If i set a PR on the first set, should I still do the second set?

2.) Say im aiming for 5-10 reps, and the first set is too light. So I can do 10 reps with certainty. Do i go all the way to 10, then increaes the weight on the next set, and see what I can do. Or do I stop around 7, so that I can get more reps with the heavier weight on the next set?

3.) The way Ive been doing things so far, is to go with a weight I think is right, and do as many reps as possible. If I get 10 reps, I increase the weight on the next set. If I dont get 10 reps, I keep the weight the same, and do as many reps as I can on the second set.

Is this a good way to do things?

4.) Otherwise, I was thinking I could do my first set “heavy” and shoot more for 5 reps, and then decrease the weight and go for 8-10 on my second set.

Thank in advance everyone.

I think your questions truly indicate analysis paralysis. Most advanced guys or guys on the road to being advanced do not get caught up in quibbles such as this. However, they are intelligent questions.

After all, most intelligent people are guilty of analysis paralysis. I have all of Jay’s e-books, including his first one, Get Jacked.

  1. If your program calls for 2 sets, do 2 sets, if you are up to it. I feel volume is more important for the beginner and intensity is more important for the advanced person. If you are still an intermediate and bench press less than 225, deadlift and squat less than 315, then I THINK you MAY benefit from more sets.

Keep in mind, I am from the Dorian Yates line of thinking that a beginner needs more volume and frequency to progress.

  1. If the weight seems effortless to lift, stop the set, increase the weight, and resume your sets. On the other hand, if you HAPPEN to go above ten reps - say to 13 - its not like you “wasted” the set if you outperformed yourself since last workout for that exercise.

  2. This is a statement, not a question.

  3. Very few bodybuilders do this anymore - reverse pyramiding, lowering the weight and increasing the reps from set to set. I think its antiquated for a reason.

Thanks for the replies. I agree with everything you said. I consider myself intermediate, but also prefer to work out with a good amount of intensity. So I usually keep the volume low, and the frequency a bit higher.

I guess based on what you said, I should just keep doing things the way I have been, and focus on progression more and more.

Thanks again.

[quote]Bricknyce wrote:

  1. Very few bodybuilders do this anymore - reverse pyramiding, lowering the weight and increasing the reps from set to set. I think its antiquated for a reason.

[/quote]

I’m interested as to why you believe this scheme is antiquated? Not looking to pick a fight, I’m truly curious.

Leon,

Talking about a subject peacefully is not picking fights. I do not mind.

I cannot say I know the exact reason but I, personally, cannot see the reasoning in lowering a weight to do more reps on a next set.

Its not bad per se, but at the same time, I can’t see a good reason for it. That’s all. But I do not know everything about training. This is just an inference.

[quote]Bricknyce wrote:

I cannot say I know the exact reason but I, personally, cannot see the reasoning in lowering a weight to do more reps on a next set. Its not bad per se, but at the same time, I can’t see a good reason for it.

That’s all. But I do not know everything about training. This is just an inference. [/quote]

Do you feel the effort devoted to these subsequent sets would be better utilized in altogether different exercises for the same body party? I’m slowly moving toward that way of thinking after some of my recent workouts.

[quote]Bricknyce wrote:
Leon,

Talking about a subject peacefully is not picking fights. I do not mind.

I cannot say I know the exact reason but I, personally, cannot see the reasoning in lowering a weight to do more reps on a next set.

Its not bad per se, but at the same time, I can’t see a good reason for it. That’s all. But I do not know everything about training. This is just an inference. [/quote]

Because you can use more weight on your heaviest set since you aren’t beaten down from the previous working sets?