Putting Together a DB Bicep Workout

What would be the best excersice to group with standing bar curl and standing hammer curls for a bicept workout, standing dumbbell curl, seated dumbbell curl, or seated incline dumbbell curls? What are the differences between these if any?

I believe an more appropriate question would be how can I build big biceps? Unfortunately we could give you all the methods of arm training under the sun but this would give the normal trainee about a half an inch of growth maximum.

To obtain large arms you must training the body as a whole. In basic terms if you want to have big arms you need big legs, chest, back, shoulders triceps the works.

My advice find a quality mass program on this website appropriate to your level and train with all intensity and eat lots of good foods and then you will get the growth you desire.

Long Live The Bodyscience

[quote]Physical_Culture wrote:
I believe an more appropriate question would be how can I build big biceps? Unfortunately we could give you all the methods of arm training under the sun but this would give the normal trainee about a half an inch of growth maximum.

To obtain large arms you must training the body as a whole. In basic terms if you want to have big arms you need big legs, chest, back, shoulders triceps the works.

My advice find a quality mass program on this website appropriate to your level and train with all intensity and eat lots of good foods and then you will get the growth you desire.

Long Live The Bodyscience
[/quote]

Good advice Physical, I’ll second that.

As far as the exercises themselves, my best advice to you is to experiment with as many variations as possible to find which ones work best for you. But, make sure not to change them too often, if you do that it’ll be hard to determine what worked and what didn’t.

As far as differences between the exercises, leverage, amount of supination, degree of shoulder flexion/extension, ability to cheat/use “body english”, etc…

chinups

Squats, Milk (and Chinups).

thanks for the info, about all the other workouts i know, this was a specific question for 1 excercise. I have a whole workout plan that works out my whole body and am quite happy with it so far, was just curious about the 1 bicept aspect. I already do pullups for my back day, should i still do chinups the next day for arms? (My program consists of 4 days: chest/back, bis/tris, legs/shoulds, rest)
thanks

[quote]GDwarrior wrote:
I already do pullups for my back day, should i still do chinups the next day for arms? (My program consists of 4 days: chest/back, bis/tris, legs/shoulds, rest)
thanks[/quote]

No. Chins are still primarily supposed to be a back exercise. They do though place more emphasis on the bi’s than pull-ups (pronated grip). If your arms are seriously lagging behind your back, then perhaps you might want to do chins instead of pull-ups. In other words, to bring up lagging biceps, do back exercises that place secondary emphasis on the bi’s (supinated versions of rows and pull-ups).

To be honest though, seeing as you’re posting this in the beginner’s section, I honestly doubt that you need to worry about lagging body parts at this point in the game.

I’d say stick to isolation exercises for the bi’s on your “bis/tris” day. Not only are isolation exercises specifically designed to build your biceps, but they also place considerably less stress on your nervous system/recovery systems. Also, you don’t want to be working “back” out two days in a row (especially if your goal is muscle and you are actually working hard in the gym), so chins on bi/tri day might actually wind up being counterproductive.

Hope this helps and good luck.

If you ask me, an entire day to train (Read: “bis/tris”) is just plain stupid. To get big arms, you need compound movements, you need rows (!) and so forth. I really don’t see a point in spending your entire workout session doing curls, when you can achieve growth at a much faster right doing exercises that activate more then 3% of your muscles at a time.

Have you designed the entire program yourself? If so, I’d seriously consider going for a program that’s already been made by a professional. Maybe a 5x5 variant of some kind. That way you’re sure to get something that’s a bit more ideal. When you become more experienced yourself, feel free to design your own programs.

(For all i know, you could be experienced. But i did in fact react to the “bi/tri” day, and tho everybody might not agree with me, I still say that an entire day just for those two muscles is a big waste of time. You should spend your time more wisely.

Nobody ever listens to the advise on these forums do they? It took a long time for me to understand that when a majority of people say something works…it must work!

So, that being said… Chin ups/pull ups can not beat for bicep work. Weighted Dips can not be beat for Triceps. If you want to add a little boost to your arms try this…

Weighted Chin up/pull up
Weighted DIPS
Reverse curls
Close grip bench
Hammer Curls

PM me after about a month and tell me how much your arms grew!

You can’t fire a cannon from a canoe. build up your chest, back and legs and the arms will take care of themselves.

Instead of 4 days: chest/back, bis/tris, legs/shoulds, rest) Try 3 days, chest/back, Quads/Hams, rest.

Or you could just go upper - lower - upper - lower

Isn’t that what I said?

please for the love of pete, there IS NO “T” IN BICEPS!

[quote]Kal-El wrote:
Nobody ever listens to the advise on these forums do they? It took a long time for me to understand that when a majority of people say something works…it must work!

So, that being said… Chin ups/pull ups can not beat for bicep work. Weighted Dips can not be beat for Triceps. If you want to add a little boost to your arms try this…

Weighted Chin up/pull up
Weighted DIPS
Reverse curls
Close grip bench
Hammer Curls

PM me after about a month and tell me how much your arms grew![/quote]

Sorry but I’m gonna have to disagree with you there. I’m not saying that chins aren’t good as a secondary biceps exercise, but you’d be hard pressed to show me a large number of guys who built world class biceps without doing direct arm work.

My arms don’t grow from doing chins (weighted), my back does. Even the narrow grip supinated version builds primarily my lats. When I was learning how to resistance train the vast majority of guys would tell you to focus on pulling with the elbows during back exercises (so that the muscles of the back, i.e. lats/traps/etc… do the work and not the arm flexors).

This is how guys like Arnold, Franco, and pretty much every bodybuilder that I can think of still to this day says to do back exercises. Those guys also all do direct arm work (curls) to build up their biceps.

This whole concept that avoiding direct arm work is in some way more beneficial for arm size than doing direct arm work simply has no basis in reality. Where are all the hordes of guys with huge arms who don’t do direct arm work? If it was so unnecessary, then why do bodybuilders still do it?

By the way I am not in any way suggesting that doing heavy compound movements are not necessary for growth. Just pointing out that direct work is also beneficial if you want maximal results.

[quote]sphaw wrote:
Or you could just go upper - lower - upper - lower[/quote]

I’m a big fan of a two say split (i.e. Upper/Lower, Push/Pull, etc…) for putting on mass myself.

[quote]Sentoguy wrote:
sphaw wrote:
Or you could just go upper - lower - upper - lower

I’m a big fan of a two say split (i.e. Upper/Lower, Push/Pull, etc…) for putting on mass myself. [/quote]

Not saying I’m a big strong guy or anything, but I’ve built most of my strength on an upper/lower routine.