T Nation

PT Tuesday Night

Heavy shot good.
Any heavy shot good.

Don’t get swept up in the details. Heavy good.

I like the glide for kids who are multisport athletes. You can get them to be “good” fairly fast, if they have the natural gifts. For athletes with the desire, we spin. I leave it up to the thrower…

[quote]lwade wrote:
Dan,
Is there an advantage, if any, using the spin vs. the glide? The spin seems to be so much more common. I also read in “Get Up” where Gary bought an 18# shot. I also remember you saying you are an advocate and/or proponent (correct me if I’m wrong) of using the heavier shot. Is it better to use the 18#?
Lonnie[/quote]

Yep.

Danny: people love you. YOu don’t have to worry about it.

Danny: Success? It’s an inside job.

Danny: Chains on every press and squat in your career.

Danny: O lift. Get on the bus every Saturday and go to Pacifica and train with Dick Notmeyer.

Danny: Fish Oil. Low carb. Protein is your friend. Drink water.

Danny: You were damn right about so many things. You gave up SO much in the way of social life and proms and parties and all the other stuff. It was worth every sacrifice…because the rewards were far better than the hanging around in a crowded house with lots of noise trying to act like you fit in…you never fit in. In anything. You won’t fit in at 48, too.

The sad thing is…I was right about a lot more than I was wrong…

[quote]Danny John wrote:
This is a good question…let me think about it for more than ten seconds…

Bastard Guy wrote:
What life stuff would you have started earlier had you only known … “if I knew then what I know now”?

Bastard

ps: need anything from California?

[/quote]

Can anyone tell me the diffrence between power snathch and the full snatch.
[quote]Danny John wrote:
Not true! Go to my site and look around for the materials. I also posted a ton about guys who used OLAD back in the day. 7 sets of 5 is awesome for the Power Snatch…

If you worked with me and said “Hey, I want to be great at (fill in the blank)” I would work your butt off mastering the keys to the goal.

PBBC: snatch and c and j. That was the goal, I did it.

I work with throwers and team sport athletes…they don’t necessarily need to do the full lifts…

TunaGill wrote:
DJ, two questions:

In your original OLAD article here on T-Nation, you didn’t list as an example the Olympic lifts. I assume this was because you prescribed 7 sets of 5 the first week, etc. (too many reps for snatches or C&J, I imagine).

I was wondering if you have ever designed sets/reps schemes for OLAD for people who want to do Olympic Lifts.

Also, in your Pacifica Barbell Materials, you stated that your old coach, Mr. Notmeyer, didn’t like lifters to go into the power position, but that he prefered the full position (because the power position would fail the athlete later on, I think you said). How come you constantly advocate the power versions over the full versions?

[/quote]

Prince John,
Two questions please.

1 - Could I get you opinion on these four words:
Tabata-Style Car Pushing.
(In general, and specifically, for a 16-year old basketball player with basic, basic strength-training experience.)

2 - On nutrition, would you rather have: a whole bunch of meat; A chunk of meat about the size of your hand; or 10-ounces of meat (pre-cooked weight)? (That is to say, food-wise, what’s your take on being super-duper accurate with the “how much of whats”)

Thanks a boatload.

Okay: Power Snatch, you catch the weight high with barely any leg bend. Squat snatch, you pull yourself under and catch it in the deep squat.

[quote]regy61669 wrote:
Can anyone tell me the diffrence between power snathch and the full snatch.
Danny John wrote:
Not true! Go to my site and look around for the materials. I also posted a ton about guys who used OLAD back in the day. 7 sets of 5 is awesome for the Power Snatch…

If you worked with me and said “Hey, I want to be great at (fill in the blank)” I would work your butt off mastering the keys to the goal.

PBBC: snatch and c and j. That was the goal, I did it.

I work with throwers and team sport athletes…they don’t necessarily need to do the full lifts…

TunaGill wrote:
DJ, two questions:

In your original OLAD article here on T-Nation, you didn’t list as an example the Olympic lifts. I assume this was because you prescribed 7 sets of 5 the first week, etc. (too many reps for snatches or C&J, I imagine).

I was wondering if you have ever designed sets/reps schemes for OLAD for people who want to do Olympic Lifts.

Also, in your Pacifica Barbell Materials, you stated that your old coach, Mr. Notmeyer, didn’t like lifters to go into the power position, but that he prefered the full position (because the power position would fail the athlete later on, I think you said). How come you constantly advocate the power versions over the full versions?

[/quote]

The problem with any movement using Tabata is the “slowing down.” I like Front Squats, Thrusters, and Bottom to Bottom Squats because…when you stop, you stop. If you do car pushing, somebody has to trust somebody…a lot!!!

Moreover, does a basketball player need a big VO2 max? The research…as I remember…is that NBA players VO2 maxs are quite low, close to untrained athletes. I think your idea has merit, but will it carry over?

ON a sidenote, most basketball players I know spend most of their time TALKING about how good they are…rather than actually training…

[quote]Minotaur wrote:
Prince John,
Two questions please.

1 - Could I get you opinion on these four words:
Tabata-Style Car Pushing.
(In general, and specifically, for a 16-year old basketball player with basic, basic strength-training experience.)

2 - On nutrition, would you rather have: a whole bunch of meat; A chunk of meat about the size of your hand; or 10-ounces of meat (pre-cooked weight)? (That is to say, food-wise, what’s your take on being super-duper accurate with the “how much of whats”)

Thanks a boatload.[/quote]

The meat issue: don’t eat for a week. The amount you desire is a normal portion.

I find that meat fills me up faster than anything else I consume (outside of salmon…)

Hello Dan,

You seem to advocate isometric ab work a lot. What do you consider it’s advantages over other ab work? And what isometric exercises do you use?

Dan,

In your 3 Mentors article you mention the following training program used by Robby Robinson:

Basically, his best workout came down to two cycles or supersets:

  1. Bench Press

  2. Pull-ups

He’d do “set after set after set” of these and he told me he could “feel his whole upper body grow.”

For his lower body:

  1. Front Squats

  2. Straight-legged deadlifts

Again, “set after set after set” until his legs blew up.

Would you be able to elaborate on this a bit please and give details of frequency and whether this was a full-body routine or whether he did upper and lower body days?

Thanks
Dan E

I got this from Gregg Glassman and then Robb Wolf crystallized it in my mind - the abs fail NOW. They don’t slowly fail. One idea is that if they slowly failed, your spinal column would get hurt. So, they tend to just BOOM…gone. You can do a billion crunches, but I have found that a one minute up to three minute hold is far superior. I hang from the pull up bar, or the dip rack, or just from sitting on a bench…raise both knees to your chest. Don’t let them go down.

Do it for a minute. Don’t debate…do it. Honest to God, don’t respond until you do it. I don’t want to hear some internet discussion expert…do it.

If that is too easy, do it for three minutes. Or do it with straight legs. Or hold a three pound dumbbell between your ankles.

I can always tell when people lie about this…they say, “I felt nothing.” That means, they didn’t do it. It’s like those workouts of the day where you are expected to Clean and Jerk 225 pounds for 15 reps and people write in that they did it in 30 seconds and it wasn’t much…

[quote]Hoffa wrote:
Hello Dan,

You seem to advocate isometric ab work a lot. What do you consider it’s advantages over other ab work? And what isometric exercises do you use?[/quote]

No.

That is what he told me three decades ago.

Do you want me to make something up?

Here you go:

“Robby found this was too easy. He was using 405 on the Front Squats for 20s and 315 on the deadlifts for 20s for ten sets each in under thirty minutes. So, he went over to the Adductor machine and worked out with a sports drink in one hand while adjusting his iPod in the other. He was amazed at the pump and abandoned his other workout.”

Just do the workout…as written…with massive weights and a lot of reps…three days a week…for two weeks. Report EXACTLY what you do in two weeks. Then, we can discuss variations.

Dan…just do it.

[quote]Dan E wrote:
Dan,

In your 3 Mentors article you mention the following training program used by Robby Robinson:

Basically, his best workout came down to two cycles or supersets:

  1. Bench Press

  2. Pull-ups

He’d do “set after set after set” of these and he told me he could “feel his whole upper body grow.”

For his lower body:

  1. Front Squats

  2. Straight-legged deadlifts

Again, “set after set after set” until his legs blew up.

Would you be able to elaborate on this a bit please and give details of frequency and whether this was a full-body routine or whether he did upper and lower body days?

Thanks
Dan E[/quote]

Dan,

Those last two answers are why I always check out the over 35 forum first, to see if you’ve posted.

I love this site.

Thanks Dan,

I just tried it in the gym. It feels good. It also stretches my back after deadlifts.

I now owe a big part of my current workout to your writings:

Military presses, 8-6-4. Same weight with a minute rest, start each set with a power clean. Up the weight when I make 22 reps total.
Deadlifts, lighter sets with snatch grip, last set 3 reps regular grip.
My new toy, iso ab hang. Straight legs for as long as I manage
Pullups.

I tried using Tabata thrusters as a finisher, but it was too much. I now do them on a separate day.

I really like this workout. Thanks for making your ideas so easily available, both on this site and your own.

Hoffa

[quote]Danny John wrote:
I got this from Gregg Glassman and then Robb Wolf crystallized it in my mind - the abs fail NOW. They don’t slowly fail. One idea is that if they slowly failed, your spinal column would get hurt. So, they tend to just BOOM…gone. You can do a billion crunches, but I have found that a one minute up to three minute hold is far superior. I hang from the pull up bar, or the dip rack, or just from sitting on a bench…raise both knees to your chest. Don’t let them go down.

Do it for a minute. Don’t debate…do it. Honest to God, don’t respond until you do it. I don’t want to hear some internet discussion expert…do it.

If that is too easy, do it for three minutes. Or do it with straight legs. Or hold a three pound dumbbell between your ankles.

I can always tell when people lie about this…they say, “I felt nothing.” That means, they didn’t do it. It’s like those workouts of the day where you are expected to Clean and Jerk 225 pounds for 15 reps and people write in that they did it in 30 seconds and it wasn’t much…

[/quote]

Coach

this one had me rolling on the floor.

Richard

PS. Loved the self-evident truths article.

I think I hear a voice crying in the wilderness, and it’s not gonna lead to endorsements.

[quote]Danny John wrote:
No.

That is what he told me three decades ago.

Do you want me to make something up?

Here you go:

“Robby found this was too easy. He was using 405 on the Front Squats for 20s and 315 on the deadlifts for 20s for ten sets each in under thirty minutes. So, he went over to the Adductor machine and worked out with a sports drink in one hand while adjusting his iPod in the other. He was amazed at the pump and abandoned his other workout.”

Just do the workout…as written…with massive weights and a lot of reps…three days a week…for two weeks. Report EXACTLY what you do in two weeks. Then, we can discuss variations.

Dan…just do it.

Dan E wrote:
Dan,

In your 3 Mentors article you mention the following training program used by Robby Robinson:

Basically, his best workout came down to two cycles or supersets:

  1. Bench Press

  2. Pull-ups

He’d do “set after set after set” of these and he told me he could “feel his whole upper body grow.”

For his lower body:

  1. Front Squats

  2. Straight-legged deadlifts

Again, “set after set after set” until his legs blew up.

Would you be able to elaborate on this a bit please and give details of frequency and whether this was a full-body routine or whether he did upper and lower body days?

Thanks
Dan E

[/quote]

Thanks for the reply Dan - point taken!!

I will report back in a couple of weeks.

Dan