PT Ideas

Long time lurker, first time poster. Be gentle. Well, I’m not the biggest fan of Army PT in the mornings, so whenever I’m in charge I try to mix it up. With a PT test come and gone, and a huge majority of the soldiers in my company bombing the run, we have been tasked with doing cardio (read: running) every day. The repeated long distance running is killing my legs. I’m just curious of some other ideas fellow Joe’s have here on incorporating some good cardio into PT sessions without necessarily running everyone into the ground.

Define long distance. And how is it killing your legs, literally in the ligaments or shin splints, what exactly?

As far as good ideas for mixing it up, do Indian runs, light pole sprints, and cadence. Indian I think would be the easiest of these for some nasty soldiers, it implements sprinting and then allows them to recover from the sprint for a minute or so before they go again, depending on the amount of guys you have with you.

Light pole runs is basically HIIT, sprint from light pole to the next one, then jog, then sprint from the next to the next, then jog.

However cadence was always my personal favorite, it took my pft time from basically the corps minimum to pretty damn good just because screaming makes you really open up lungs.

Otherwise do runs in full gear, or if you want to be a real asshole make them wear gas masks, that will ruin someones lungs real fast “in a good way”, its supposed to be similar to training at altitude. Otherwise another personal favorite was called island hopping in basic, you basically…I dunno what the army calls it, kill them with pushups and situps and jumping jacks making them scream and then do a few sprints, then kill them again. This will really get peoples hearts going. Remember, running isn’t supposed to be comfortable.

I define long distance as having to run three miles or more. And it’s giving me shin splints. My left leg is killing me. Let me explain a little more; I’m currently in ROTC. Yes, I’m active duty, but about a year and a half ago I was accepted into the Green to Gold program. I get to go back to school, earn my bachelor’s and get commissioned as an officer while keeping my active duty benefits. Now that I’m a senior, we’re in charge of training all of the juniors in ROTC. The person in charge of PT rotates, and when I’m in charge I hate to do straight long distance runs. And trust me, I’ve never found running to be comfortable.

I have to agree with Tyrant as far as some of the variations of the running. why dont you try and setup some kind of interval relay scenario? this would help build cohesion and motivate people to push themselves. im not sure how many people you are doing PT with (i would imagine no greater then a company size), but setup teams and have people do buddy carries, low crawl, 3-5 second rushes or some other military movement. i think using gear would be the best way to do this, so your Soldiers get used to training with the extra weight. just watch out for someone diving during a rush and smacking themselves with a rifle or something.

so you’re referring as your fellow cadets as ‘soldiers in your company’

awesome.

do you guys have any spaceship door gunner slots? i was hoping to pick one of those up after I graduate from Halo ODST school.

Well, I’m a Green to Gold ADO cadet, and about 90% or so of the cadets are either ADO or prior service, so it has that feel. Slip of the tongue. But hey, thanks for contributing!

[quote]HolyMacaroni wrote:
do you guys have any spaceship door gunner slots? i was hoping to pick one of those up after I graduate from Halo ODST school.[/quote]

I call “shotgun” for the wing gunner slot!!! You know like in Riddick…

HolyWonTon: I think you mean Halo 3.3 “Legendary” ODST School… now I know where you got that “legend” tab from!!!


LOL

<3

[quote]HolyMacaroni wrote:
so you’re referring as your fellow cadets as ‘soldiers in your company’

awesome.

do you guys have any spaceship door gunner slots? i was hoping to pick one of those up after I graduate from Halo ODST school.[/quote]

a ‘wisened’ second lieutenant busting the balls of an ROTC cadet. Good shit.

[quote]DirtyM wrote:

[quote]HolyMacaroni wrote:
so you’re referring as your fellow cadets as ‘soldiers in your company’

awesome.

do you guys have any spaceship door gunner slots? i was hoping to pick one of those up after I graduate from Halo ODST school.[/quote]

a ‘wisened’ second lieutenant busting the balls of an ROTC cadet. Good shit. [/quote]

dude my face has black stuff over it, now i can bust the balls of field grade

[quote]FTWKid wrote:
Long time lurker, first time poster. Be gentle. Well, I’m not the biggest fan of Army PT in the mornings, so whenever I’m in charge I try to mix it up. With a PT test come and gone, and a huge majority of the soldiers in my company bombing the run, we have been tasked with doing cardio (read: running) every day. The repeated long distance running is killing my legs. I’m just curious of some other ideas fellow Joe’s have here on incorporating some good cardio into PT sessions without necessarily running everyone into the ground.[/quote]

As a fellow PS GTG Cadet I feel your pain. In our BN if you score 80 or higher in every event you do PT M-W-R, guess what we do M-R? If you said “Long Distance Runs” pat yourself on the back. Yet all these long distance runs we do, what percentage of our BN scores 90 or higher on their APFT 2-mile? 20, which is like 10 cadets. Now when me and my buddy were running Ranger Challenge PT last semester we were allowed to do our own programming. We did ONE long distance run the entire semester and every single one of those guys passed the APFT 2-mile with 90 percent or higher. Guess who the 10 were that passed the latest APFT with 90 or higher on the run? If you said prior Ranger Challenge cadets put yourself in for an AAM! Yet with all this evidence that we have that long distance runs don’t do shit besides break people, we still !@#$%^& do them! Drives me absolutely nuts. Anyway hit your PMS with some factual evidence, there is a ton out there if you look. Good Luck.

[quote]armygrunt82 wrote:

[quote]FTWKid wrote:
Long time lurker, first time poster. Be gentle. Well, I’m not the biggest fan of Army PT in the mornings, so whenever I’m in charge I try to mix it up. With a PT test come and gone, and a huge majority of the soldiers in my company bombing the run, we have been tasked with doing cardio (read: running) every day. The repeated long distance running is killing my legs. I’m just curious of some other ideas fellow Joe’s have here on incorporating some good cardio into PT sessions without necessarily running everyone into the ground.[/quote]

As a fellow PS GTG Cadet I feel your pain. In our BN if you score 80 or higher in every event you do PT M-W-R, guess what we do M-R? If you said “Long Distance Runs” pat yourself on the back. Yet all these long distance runs we do, what percentage of our BN scores 90 or higher on their APFT 2-mile? 20, which is like 10 cadets. Now when me and my buddy were running Ranger Challenge PT last semester we were allowed to do our own programming. We did ONE long distance run the entire semester and every single one of those guys passed the APFT 2-mile with 90 percent or higher. Guess who the 10 were that passed the latest APFT with 90 or higher on the run? If you said prior Ranger Challenge cadets put yourself in for an AAM! Yet with all this evidence that we have that long distance runs don’t do shit besides break people, we still !@#$%^& do them! Drives me absolutely nuts. Anyway hit your PMS with some factual evidence, there is a ton out there if you look. Good Luck.[/quote]

There is plenty of reason to do long distance runs, the problem lies in the worthless sacks of shit who don’t take it seriously, and eat whatever they want in the time between PT and the PFTs. A buddy of mine was in some program for the army, he was enlisted reserve, but in school, and after he got his A.A. they were going to throw him into officer school, but he didnt keep his grades high and got deployed.

Anyhow, whenever he went away for the weekend of the month, they’d do a PFT, and all but 1-2 people failed one time, and all of them failed another time.

For the original post though, you could setup a circuit, you sprint 50 yards to one station, pick up some weights and do walking lunges, run to another and do max pull ups (or assisted if they are all pathetic), then do fireman carries etc. This keeps things interesting and gives them a short break on moving when the get to a station, but keeps their heart rate high and can kill their lungs on the sprints and some exercises. Of course this is assuming you have some equipment. Otherwise you could just do calisthenics at each station.

“There is plenty of reason to do long distance runs”

Such as?

[quote]Tyrant wrote:

[quote]armygrunt82 wrote:

[quote]FTWKid wrote:
Long time lurker, first time poster. Be gentle. Well, I’m not the biggest fan of Army PT in the mornings, so whenever I’m in charge I try to mix it up. With a PT test come and gone, and a huge majority of the soldiers in my company bombing the run, we have been tasked with doing cardio (read: running) every day. The repeated long distance running is killing my legs. I’m just curious of some other ideas fellow Joe’s have here on incorporating some good cardio into PT sessions without necessarily running everyone into the ground.[/quote]

As a fellow PS GTG Cadet I feel your pain. In our BN if you score 80 or higher in every event you do PT M-W-R, guess what we do M-R? If you said “Long Distance Runs” pat yourself on the back. Yet all these long distance runs we do, what percentage of our BN scores 90 or higher on their APFT 2-mile? 20, which is like 10 cadets. Now when me and my buddy were running Ranger Challenge PT last semester we were allowed to do our own programming. We did ONE long distance run the entire semester and every single one of those guys passed the APFT 2-mile with 90 percent or higher. Guess who the 10 were that passed the latest APFT with 90 or higher on the run? If you said prior Ranger Challenge cadets put yourself in for an AAM! Yet with all this evidence that we have that long distance runs don’t do shit besides break people, we still !@#$%^& do them! Drives me absolutely nuts. Anyway hit your PMS with some factual evidence, there is a ton out there if you look. Good Luck.[/quote]

There is plenty of reason to do long distance runs, the problem lies in the worthless sacks of shit who don’t take it seriously, and eat whatever they want in the time between PT and the PFTs. A buddy of mine was in some program for the army, he was enlisted reserve, but in school, and after he got his A.A. they were going to throw him into officer school, but he didnt keep his grades high and got deployed.

Anyhow, whenever he went away for the weekend of the month, they’d do a PFT, and all but 1-2 people failed one time, and all of them failed another time.

For the original post though, you could setup a circuit, you sprint 50 yards to one station, pick up some weights and do walking lunges, run to another and do max pull ups (or assisted if they are all pathetic), then do fireman carries etc. This keeps things interesting and gives them a short break on moving when the get to a station, but keeps their heart rate high and can kill their lungs on the sprints and some exercises. Of course this is assuming you have some equipment. Otherwise you could just do calisthenics at each station.

[/quote]

Running long distance enables you to…run long distance. I see little practicality in running beyond three miles (or no more than 25 minutes) at a time. Unless you are training specifically for some course/selection that has standard or non-standard runs greater than that distance.

If being a PT failure isn’t enough motivation to go train on their own, these slugs aren’t officer material anyway. And 3 miles is not long distance.

[quote]devildog_jim wrote:
If being a PT failure isn’t enough motivation to go train on their own, these slugs aren’t officer material anyway. And 3 miles is not long distance.[/quote]

I would have to agree, while we only have a handful that fail the APFT for any given MS class, for the most part even the slackers strive for 80% in each event which keeps them from having to come to PT Mon-Fri. The one’s that do fail are generally released from the program the next semester.