T Nation

Psoas Muscle and Pelvic Alignment


#1

okay, so ive developed a for the most part textbook case of misalignment. i think it all started getting bad in cross country in my high-school years when i kept getting stress fractures. Probably by over training and enhancing minor imbalances and making them worse without confronting the alignment issue.

The current state my body is like this. Left shoulder raised a little, Right pelvis raised about an inch higher than the other, mild scoliosis with convexity to the left, left ankle seems collapsed/weak, right foot is the stress fracture foot that is recieving uneven force load.

been to an MD, she just said awww ur find kid, nobodys perfectly aligned just live a happy healthy life... i just took it, but then i thought to myself if my health is compromised already at age twenty, imagine how its gonna be years from now.

been to like 5 chiros, most i knew were quacks and the one i stayed with adjusted me for about a year, and nothing changed except temporary relief/placebo effect.

this is what ive been doing for a week and a half everyday to try and confront imbalances...

on the left side (strengthening) in hopes to raise that hip and take stress of right hip
-Lunges
-one legged squats
-glute activation excersise
-hip lift excersise

On the right (lengthening)
-Stretching everything (osteopath told me to)

My question is, isnt it weird that my spine is being pulled to the left if the raised hip side (my right side) is supposed to be the tight side that needs lengthening?

any guidance on my case is welcome


#2

if it the psoas muscle that needs to be released go to a masseur who can do it. i got mine released and it's no longer super tight but still needs to be stretched out regularly. Including foam rolling and a tennis ball which works better to dig into the psoas.

i can now feel the improvement in my posture and strides. If i was a runner, my strides would be longer.

there are tests you can do to see what kind of condition the psoas muscle is in.


#3

I guess more of what im asking is, does this imbalances workout plan make sense? And does lengthening the psoas equate to my right hip lowering? And also since my brain has probably neurologically adjusted to these imbalances would an imbalanced workout be futile


#4

I guess more of what im asking is, does this imbalances workout plan make sense? And does lengthening the psoas equate to my right hip lowering? And also since my brain has probably neurologically adjusted to these imbalances would an imbalanced workout be futile


#5

Sounds like you're really motivated to get this sorted out so kudos to you. Chiros are a mixed bag, can be tough to find a good one. Sounds like you may need to look into ART, or at least find someone who can perform a functional assessment to see what imbalances you might have and how relevant they truly are. Depending on your training/sport history, and future plans some imbalances may not be important, that is why you should find someone who comes well recommended and knows what they're doing.

With all due respect blue... unless you're extremely skinny, you're not even going to sniff the bulk of the psoas with a foam roller or a tennis ball, it attaches to the anterior spine, you might be able to roll out the superficial portion, but the bulk is pretty deep, especially in anyone with any type of mass on them.


#6

Not really since your spine works somewhat like a cable stay bridge. So if the muscle on the right side (clue: quadrutus lumborum very involved in this motion) is tight and short (thereby raising the hip) the one on the left will be weaker and longer. This means a "collapsing" pull on the right.
Do a lot of single leg stuff and look into the functional movement screen, but firstly you need to figure out whether it is structural or a soft tissue problem, if it is structural you can do your best to minimize it and if after doing that it still doesn't work surgery would be the only way to fix it(which brings you to the point where the surgeon will weigh the risks versus rewards). If it is soft tissue damage you should do fine just by addressing the muscular imbalances.

The key will be to train your body with the right movements to re-tone the muscle that are hypotonic and the only way to effectively achieve this is repetitive concerted efforts.


#7

Hmm. Ive been analyzed by my osteopath and he mentioned how my gait is jacked up. I feel like the hitched up shoulder and opposite hitched pelvis compensation pattern is common enough that somebody would come up with proven excersises and stretches to fix it.


#8

Structural refers to actual bone Lenth right? All my limbs symmetrical in length, I mean not perfect but no imperfect enough to be the cause, so that makes it functional. Functional just means my muscles and tendons are retarded :slightly_smiling: right? In any case anyone know which side I should do my planks on to fix imbalance? My right side feels weaker, but I was confused cuz that's supposed to be the tighter pelvis side...


#9

Structural refers to actual bone Lenth right? All my limbs symmetrical in length, I mean not perfect but no imperfect enough to be the cause, so that makes it functional. Functional just means my muscles and tendons are retarded :slight_smile: right? In any case anyone know which side I should do my planks on to fix imbalance? My right side feels weaker, but I was confused cuz that's supposed to be the tighter pelvis side...


#10

Yes Structural is the bone length, so the issue is with the soft tissue, you should do planks on both sides.
The same we you got this problem is the same way you got rid of it.
You compensated by actively recruiting certain muscle patterns repeatedly, so to reverse it you have to actively and repeatedly recruit the antagonistic (opposing) muscles. SO focus on keeping correct posture until it becomes second nature, to find out WHICH muscles to focus on you will have to see a professional in person, at the very best we can give you pointers but only a hands on examination will allow you to optimally fix the problem


#11

Hi

I have been researching this as I'm suffering from exactly the same issue. My right hip is pulled up and the psoas is tight. I wondered how you got on? *(Chucker)

I've had Lumbar back surgery and MRI scans etc, also I have recently been to a consultant regarding the Psoas, I also have mild scoliosis in the lumbar. Whilst its all inter related I've now got to the point where I'm trying to work on the Psoas tightness and weakness in the opposite side similar to what you describe.

It seems for me sitting for longer than 15 mins or getting up in the morning I encounter severe stiffness. The more I loosen up the better my posture is etc

So reading around the subject the exercises you have undertaken seem to be the best way forward. Hopefully you are still active on these forums; how have you been progressing?

If anyone has any further insight into this area it would be nice to hear.

Thanks.