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Protien Powder for Young Children?

I have a 4yr old daughter and as those of you with kids will know its pretty hard to get them to eat a really good diet all the time, I was wondering if it would be benificial for her to have say a qtr scoop of protien powder a day, or are protien powders not suitable for children?

my little brother who is 10 takes a protien to keep his weight on i see nothing wrong with giving a child protein powder

Take a look at the first ingredient in baby formula- whey protein.

So yeah, it’s a whole lot better than the carb-riddled garbage food companies pass off as kid’s snacks.

I see nothing wrong with a small protein shake.

HOWEVER, your daughter is 4 years old and thusly, her body cannot process the same amount of nutrients that an adult body can. You don’t want to cause her liver and kidneys to malfunction because they have to filter and transport abnormal quantities of protein taken in liquid form.

So, for the sake of safety, I’d suggest going with Ovaltine.

It’s really just powdered milk so why not. There IS some aspartame in most low-carb versions (including Metabolic Drive) but there’s no reason not to add a half scoop of plain whey to some frozen berries and milk and blend up a tasty shake for them.

[quote]Kruiser wrote:
It’s really just powdered milk so why not. There IS some aspartame in most low-carb versions (including Metabolic Drive) but there’s no reason not to add a half scoop of plain whey to some frozen berries and milk and blend up a tasty shake for them.[/quote]

Metabolic Drive® ADVANCED�?� PROTEIN, LOW-CARB MRP �?? CHOCOLATE: protein blend (whey-protein isolate (milk), micellar casein (milk), milk-protein concentrate), cocoa powder, natural and artificial flavors, sunflower oil, polydextrose, glucono-delta-lactone, cellulose gum, potassium chloride, lecithin, mono and diglycerides, sucralose, silica.

Uhhhh…where?

It’s got to be better than any breakfast cereal out there. Moderation is the key, with my little one, I just give him about 3-4 ounces of one of my shakes, and only when he asks for it, which is most days.

[quote]Padilla7921 wrote:
I see nothing wrong with a small protein shake.

HOWEVER, your daughter is 4 years old and thusly, her body cannot process the same amount of nutrients that an adult body can. You don’t want to cause her liver and kidneys to malfunction because they have to filter and transport abnormal quantities of protein taken in liquid form.

So, for the sake of safety, I’d suggest going with Ovaltine.[/quote]

People always talk about how too much protein can do this or that, but what about too many processed carbs? Wouldn’t constantly feeding kids all of these sugar filled foods (like Ovaltine) lead to carb intolerance, excessive fat gain, and probably pre-diabetes? Oh yeah, it is and that’s why we have this fat empidemic on our hands.

On second thought electric_e, grill your kid a steak.

I think that it would be a good idea. As the others have said, it’s mainly just milk proteins.

I have 2 daughters, ages 5 and 2, and I’ve been using about a teaspoon or less in their milk since they started drinking regular milk. My oldest daughter ate little protein when she was younger. Now both my girls ask for their protein drinks in the morning. It’s better than the other crap that is trying to be passed as good for kids, eg-most cereals.

Thanks a lot guys, I can noe asess her daily diet and look into if she is lacking in protien intake.

[quote]Doug Adams wrote:
People always talk about how too much protein can do this or that, but what about too many processed carbs? Wouldn’t constantly feeding kids all of these sugar filled foods (like Ovaltine) lead to carb intolerance, excessive fat gain, and probably pre-diabetes? Oh yeah, it is and that’s why we have this fat empidemic on our hands.

On second thought electric_e, grill your kid a steak.[/quote]

While Ovaltine may not be the best, it’s surely a safe bet. But like I said, I don’t see a problem with giving his daughter say, a teaspoon of protein in milk (much like what another replier does).

Also, I’m not saying that protein will kill a liver or the kidneys, but what I am saying is that one has to be make sure that a child’s body is up to the task of processing a “substantial” (relative to the child’s normal intake) quantity of liquid protein.

[quote]Padilla7921 wrote:
Doug Adams wrote:
People always talk about how too much protein can do this or that, but what about too many processed carbs? Wouldn’t constantly feeding kids all of these sugar filled foods (like Ovaltine) lead to carb intolerance, excessive fat gain, and probably pre-diabetes? Oh yeah, it is and that’s why we have this fat empidemic on our hands.

On second thought electric_e, grill your kid a steak.

While Ovaltine may not be the best, it’s surely a safe bet. But like I said, I don’t see a problem with giving his daughter say, a teaspoon of protein in milk (much like what another replier does).

Also, I’m not saying that protein will kill a liver or the kidneys, but what I am saying is that one has to be make sure that a child’s body is up to the task of processing a “substantial” (relative to the child’s normal intake) quantity of liquid protein.[/quote]

Ovaltine is a horrible idea. One serving size of 4 table spoons has 18 grams of sugar with no protein and no fat. That is why I would recommend Super Cocoa Count Dracula honeycomb super smacks which is not just packed with sugar but high frutose corn syrup.

There should be no problem with giving your kid protein powder. It is just food.

[quote]Padilla7921 wrote:

Also, I’m not saying that protein will kill a liver or the kidneys, but what I am saying is that one has to be make sure that a child’s body is up to the task of processing a “substantial” (relative to the child’s normal intake) quantity of liquid protein.[/quote]

Well, if the child’s body can’t “process” that protein, they will just crap it out like the rest of us.

[quote]analog_kid wrote:
Well, if the child’s body can’t “process” that protein, they will just crap it out like the rest of us.[/quote]

You’re mistaken, but only slightly. Unused protein (but still processed) gets crapped out. Unprocessed protein gets pissed out, which is a tell-tale sign of kidney problems or disease.