Protein Supps vs. Protein Foods

Hey all, beginner here who loves to geek out and research the heck out of whatever I’m into. Currently that is a body makeover, as I just turned 30 and I want to get into my best shape ever.

One of the confusing things I’ve come across is protein. I understand Casein vs Whey vs Soy. What I don’t get is what kind of protein normal food is. For instance, is chicken more like casein or whey, or completely different from the two? Should you eat more protein foods, or take protein shakes? If protein food is better than protein supplements, why doesn’t anyone recommend having a cup of chicken soup (just broth and shredded chicken) before a workout instead of a shake>

Sorry if these have been covered ad nauseum, but I did a search and couldn’t find anything (nor was there anything like it in the beginner’s section that I could find.)

Think of protein as slow and fast. It’s more complicated than that, but that’s what’s important. Whey is fast, everything else is slow. After a workout you need fast uptake of protein and carbs so whey and high GI carbs are needed then. The rest of the time, slow is better because it’s like time release. You want it in your system constantly in order to be used when needed for muscle growth.

Stu

I understand that, but I haven’t heard where “protein foods” fit in. Is chicken fast or slow? Beef? Shrimp / crab? Fish? Non-meat / non-dairy such as sprouted grains, wheat germ, and brewer’s yeast?

I do understand the whey 20ish mins vs casein 2hrs deal since there is a ton of information on those two. Unfortunately, I can’t seem to find a ton of info on regular protein foods, though (probably because you can’t sell chicken et al online like you can protein shakes.)

Multiple choice:

The following Amino acid breakdown is:

a)Whey
b)Casein
c)chicken
d)beef

Protein & Amino Acids
Amounts Per Selected Serving %DV
Protein 39.4 g 79%
Tryptophan 158 mg
Threonine 651 mg
Isoleucine 731 mg
Leucine 1359 mg
Lysine 1196 mg
Methionine 389 mg
Cystine 244 mg
Phenylalanine 740 mg
Tyrosine 586 mg
Valine 896 mg
Arginine 982 mg
Histidine 455 mg
Alanine 892 mg
Aspartic acid 1431 mg
Glutamic acid 1879 mg
Glycine 763 mg
Proline 653 mg
Serine 660 mg
Hydroxyproline 27.5 mg

I’ve only been using protein powder for post-workouts. The theory is that your muscles are primed to take in nutrients after a workout and therefore, you want a source of protein that you can get to your muscles ASAP.

Real food is okay at this point, but the only problem with real food is that it takes some time to get to your muscles since it digests slowly. Due to digestion, you may miss some of the opportunity to get nutrients to your muscles. Protein powder has the protein broken down so it digests quicker in your body and therefore gets to your muscles a lot faster than regular food. That’s why protein powders are recommended post-workout. Other times, you should stick to real food. Even pre-workout. However, some people use protein powder throughout the day for convenience.

[quote]one3one wrote:
I understand that, but I haven’t heard where “protein foods” fit in. Is chicken fast or slow? Beef? Shrimp / crab? Fish? Non-meat / non-dairy such as sprouted grains, wheat germ, and brewer’s yeast?

I do understand the whey 20ish mins vs casein 2hrs deal since there is a ton of information on those two. Unfortunately, I can’t seem to find a ton of info on regular protein foods, though (probably because you can’t sell chicken et al online like you can protein shakes.)[/quote]

In my previous post I said “Whey is fast, everything else is slow”. Treat EVERYTHING as slow except whey and that includes “protein foods”.

Yeah, if you’re trying to perfectly time every protein that goes into your body then you’re probably thinking too much. There are key times in the day that count. When you first wake up, post-workout and when you go to sleep. Some people drink whey in the morning, because the body has fasted and they want to get protein into their system fast.

I don’t go that route…I just eat eggs and oatmeal. After their workout they drink a fast digesting protein…this seems to be the key area where protein powders have an edge over real food. Lastly, before you go to bed you want a slow digesting protein. Cottage cheese seems to be the best choice.

[quote]stuward wrote:
one3one wrote:
I understand that, but I haven’t heard where “protein foods” fit in. Is chicken fast or slow? Beef? Shrimp / crab? Fish? Non-meat / non-dairy such as sprouted grains, wheat germ, and brewer’s yeast?

I do understand the whey 20ish mins vs casein 2hrs deal since there is a ton of information on those two. Unfortunately, I can’t seem to find a ton of info on regular protein foods, though (probably because you can’t sell chicken et al online like you can protein shakes.)

In my previous post I said “Whey is fast, everything else is slow”. Treat EVERYTHING as slow except whey and that includes “protein foods”.
[/quote]

Sorry about that - must have missed it.

Found some good additional information:

Protein foods are slow-digesting, but don’t coagulate the stomach like casein. That means that whey protein can still do its thing if taken after whole food.

BV’s for various proteins, with the only thing looking similar to whey being eggs. Beans / wheat are even on there, but have pretty low BV rates.

eat more protein from solid source during the day. Whey shakes are great first thing in the morning, pre/peri/post workout for their fast absorption. Caseins are great when you’re in a bind for a meal and right before bed but are too slow in the morning to jump start your system. Moral of the story is eat lots of whole proteins, whey during and after your workout and cottage cheese before bed, and turkey bacon is the shit.