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Protein Powder and Kids

My wife and I add protein powder, about 1 scoop or 20 grams, to our kids milk each day. This gets divided, since we have twin boys (2 1/2 years old).

Do you think this is safe / appropriate? Our rationale is that we want to ensure an appropriate amount of protein in their diet. They eat chicken nuggets, and sausages, but we want to ensure they get enough protein.

I’d like your thoughts.

ghost87, if you’re talking about Metabolic Drive, I can’t see any negatives. If you’d like the best possible information, though, either call the company or send them an email. Then armed with all the facts, you’d be in a good position to discuss it with your pediatrician.

I don’t see any issue in that, but would not supplement with more than you currently are since their weights are likely only 30-35lbs. As long as it’s a good quality protein without other supplements added it is no worse than any of the processed fast food or junk food that most parents feed their kids.

I have a 2 yr old and he loves my shakes, especially the Metabolic Drive and Surge.
I can promise you that your doctor will frown upon this though.

You’d probably be better off not feeding them chicken nuggets at all. But hey, you can’t go food nazi on your kids too early.

I gave my daughter the old “Grow!” when she was bottle feeding one time. She didn’t like it too much. Today is a different story. I can’t drink a shake without her asking for some.

I would say she probably has been getting about 10g/day from protein powder for over 6 years now. Really, it’s just milk powder.

Since age nine my daughter has seen oatmeal, peanut butter, and a half-scoop of chocolate GROW as her pre-game meal for soccer. It’s been nine years now and she’s still living.

[quote]mk9576 wrote:
I don’t see any issue in that, but would not supplement with more than you currently are since their weights are likely only 30-35lbs. As long as it’s a good quality protein without other supplements added it is no worse than any of the processed fast food or junk food that most parents feed their kids.

I have a 2 yr old and he loves my shakes, especially the Metabolic Drive and Surge.
I can promise you that your doctor will frown upon this though.[/quote]

I would have to agree. An average doctor will end up telling you protein powder is the devil but like
mk said, it’s 100 times better than the average American child will eat.

My older son (almost 6) is small for his age and a very picky eater who seems to live on carbs. I add 1/2 a scoop of orange Metabolic Drive to his orange juice almost every day, along with a liquid multivitamin with efa’s in it.

A few times a week I make him a chocolate, peanut butter, banana shake and squeeze a Flameout in there, too.

Hmmmm… I know that Lean Mass Complex for example has a warning label on it not to serve to kids. However, this is due to the iron content and not the protein. According to the label - “Accidental overdose of iron-containing products is a leading cause of fatal poisoning in children under 6.”

The main ingredient in most brands of baby formula is whey concentrate, so let them drink it up.

[quote]mikren wrote:
Hmmmm… I know that Lean Mass Complex for example has a warning label on it not to serve to kids. However, this is due to the iron content and not the protein. According to the label - “Accidental overdose of iron-containing products is a leading cause of fatal poisoning in children under 6.”

[/quote]
A lot of protein powders have a bunch of vitamins and minerals added to them. Metabolic Drive! used to have this, but I think it was taken out around the same time that the name changed to Low-Carb Metabolic Drive or when Metabolic Drive Complete was released.

Beyond making sure my kids get enough protein (which I’m sure is essential), I would focus on them getting enough omega-3’s etc. There is a bunch of research out there pointing to them being essential for brain development for example :slight_smile:

My #2 son (of four) is fifteen and a vegetarian. A vegetarian that doesn’t particularly like vegetables. He’s skinny as a rail, constantly tired, and frequently has a cold. One problem is he doesn’t live with me and I can’t control what kind of foods he has access too. The other problem is his mother is culinarily impaired. She can’t cook for shit. Two weeks ago I got sick of his moping around when he was with me and had a tub of Metabolic Drive sent to his house just for him. I’m looking forward to seeing him this weekend to see if there is any improvement in his condition.

I don’t think it’s ever too early to teach kids to develop a palate for healthy foods. I don’t think kids should be eating chicken nuggets except for special occasions. If you restrict foods, they will be fat later in life, but I do think they should have consistent access to healthy foods to learn that it is “normal” to eat healthy.

Btw, loose tool - maybe you should send the kid to a dietician. As a parent, he won’t listen to you, but he might listen to someone else. Not to get too personal, but he may also be using this vegetarian thing as an emotional expression of some struggle he is going through, maybe due to your separation. Anyway, he probably at least needs iron, B-12, and folic acid.

[quote]Loose Tool wrote:
My #2 son (of four) is fifteen and a vegetarian. A vegetarian that doesn’t particularly like vegetables. He’s skinny as a rail, constantly tired, and frequently has a cold. One problem is he doesn’t live with me and I can’t control what kind of foods he has access too. The other problem is his mother is culinarily impaired. She can’t cook for shit. Two weeks ago I got sick of his moping around when he was with me and had a tub of Metabolic Drive sent to his house just for him. I’m looking forward to seeing him this weekend to see if there is any improvement in his condition.
[/quote]

[quote]Loose Tool wrote:
My #2 son (of four) is fifteen and a vegetarian. A vegetarian that doesn’t particularly like vegetables. He’s skinny as a rail, constantly tired, and frequently has a cold. One problem is he doesn’t live with me and I can’t control what kind of foods he has access too. The other problem is his mother is culinarily impaired. She can’t cook for shit. Two weeks ago I got sick of his moping around when he was with me and had a tub of Metabolic Drive sent to his house just for him. I’m looking forward to seeing him this weekend to see if there is any improvement in his condition.
[/quote]

Good man.

[quote]CLewis wrote:
Btw, loose tool - maybe you should send the kid to a dietician. As a parent, he won’t listen to you, but he might listen to someone else. Not to get too personal, but he may also be using this vegetarian thing as an emotional expression of some struggle he is going through, maybe due to your separation. Anyway, he probably at least needs iron, B-12, and folic acid.

[/quote]

I’ll keep that in mind. His older brother who is 17 used to be a vegetarian. He runs track in school (the mile). Early last year he was training harder and his times were getting worse.

I explained to him that if he wants to improve his time, he needs to get adequate sleep, get his diet in order - especially adequate protein - and have a good training program. He tried to get more protein but its hard to do that when you’re a teenager and not in control of the food in the house.

Well last summer he went to southwestern France. Before he left he asked what foods he should avoid. “Avoid?”, I said. “You’ve got it backwards. You should try every food that you possibly can. Not everyone your age has this opportunity.”

To make a long story short, he came back a sausage loving carnivore. He’s put on some muscle and his mile times have improved dramatically. So maybe if #2 son won’t listen to me, he’ll listen to his brother.

just try to avoid the protein powders with sweeteners,

otherwise , it’s just milk based so ideal for kids

i find Unflavoured whey, handful of blueberries+strawberries and some organic yoghurt seems to go down very well, 7 & 9 yr old are always after it

they are also on fish oil caps, which i have convinced them will make them much more intelligent, and seems to give me an easier time by smoothing out their behaviour.