Protein has an Insulin Response

I always believed that carbohydrates were the only thing that caused insulin levels to rise but apparently protein does as well. Can anyone further my education on this matter. I tried googling it and I kept on getting glucogenisis. I don’t think I spelled it right, but it’s when protein is converted to glucose.

SO is insulin only produced from protein when other nutrients are not readily available?

pretty much, if its the major macro-nutrient in your diet over an extended period of time.

Search for posts by laroyal on the subject (i think)

[quote]Stength4life wrote:
SO is insulin only produced from protein when other nutrients are not readily available? [/quote]

Simply put, no.

Don’t get caught up in worrying too much about insulin. Like many hormones, you need it, and problems arise when you produce too much or too little.

I was just curious. I question many pre contest diets that contain solely protein when they are going way below their maintinance levels.

Protein is made up of amino acids, some of which promote an insulin response, especially leucine which is one of the branched chain amino acids and a potentially important rate limiter in muscle protein synthesis.

Our brain’s preferred source of energy is glucose, a carbohydrate. When our diet is lacking in carbohyrdate(and at other times to a lesser extent) our bodies will use some amino acids to create glucose through a process called gluconeogenisis which literally means to create new glucose. The glucose created through this process has an insulin response.

Our pancreases creates and secretes insulin, it doesn not come from our diet.
Keep reading, worrying about insulin before you get the basics down is going to be coutner productive. Read and Lift.

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Some recent research published on this subject. When I first read this months ago it suddenly made sense as to why I, as a type 1 diabetic, would sometimes get enormous rises in blood sugar after eating large doses of whey. It can be particularly troublesome to manage (the glucagon release) sometimes…

Br J Nutr. 2008 Jul;100(1):61-9.

Glucagon and insulin responses after ingestion of different amounts of intact and hydrolysed proteins.

Claessens M, Saris WH, van Baak MA.

Department of Human Biology, Nutrition and Toxicology Research Institute Maastricht (NUTRIM), Maastricht University, PO Box 616, Maastricht 6200, MD, The Netherlands. 

[b]Ingestion of dietary protein is known to induce both insulin and glucagon secretion.[/b] These responses may be affected by the dose and the form (intact or hydrolysed) in which protein is ingested. The aim of the study was to investigate the effect of different amounts of intact protein and protein hydrolysate of a vegetable (soya) and animal (whey) protein on insulin and glucagon responses and to study the effect of increasing protein loads for both intact protein and protein hydrolysate in man. The study employed a repeated-measures design with Latin-square randomisation and single-blind trials. Twelve healthy non-obese males ingested three doses (0.3, 0.4 and 0.6 g/kg body weight) of intact soya protein (SPI) and soya protein hydrolysate (SPH). Another group of twelve healthy male subjects ingested three doses (0.3, 0.4 and 0.6 g/kg body weight) of intact whey protein (WPI) and whey protein hydrolysate (WPH). Blood was sampled before (t = 0) and 15, 30, 60, 90 and 120 min after protein ingestion for insulin, glucagon and glucose determination. SPI induced a higher total area under the curve for insulin and glucagon than SPH while no difference between WPI and WPH was found. Insulin and glucagon responses increased with increasing protein load for SPI, SPH, WPI and WPH, but [b]the effect was more pronounced for glucagon.[/b] A higher dose of protein or its hydrolysate will result in a lower insulin:glucagon ratio, an important parameter for the control of postprandial substrate metabolism. In conclusion, insulin and glucagon responses were protein and hydrolysate specific.

[quote]Rusty Barbell wrote:
Some recent research published on this subject. When I first read this months ago it suddenly made sense as to why I, as a type 1 diabetic, would sometimes get enormous rises in blood sugar after eating large doses of whey. It can be particularly troublesome to manage (the glucagon release) sometimes…

Br J Nutr. 2008 Jul;100(1):61-9.

Glucagon and insulin responses after ingestion of different amounts of intact and hydrolysed proteins.

Claessens M, Saris WH, van Baak MA.

Department of Human Biology, Nutrition and Toxicology Research Institute Maastricht (NUTRIM), Maastricht University, PO Box 616, Maastricht 6200, MD, The Netherlands. 

[b]Ingestion of dietary protein is known to induce both insulin and glucagon secretion.[/b] These responses may be affected by the dose and the form (intact or hydrolysed) in which protein is ingested. The aim of the study was to investigate the effect of different amounts of intact protein and protein hydrolysate of a vegetable (soya) and animal (whey) protein on insulin and glucagon responses and to study the effect of increasing protein loads for both intact protein and protein hydrolysate in man. The study employed a repeated-measures design with Latin-square randomisation and single-blind trials. Twelve healthy non-obese males ingested three doses (0.3, 0.4 and 0.6 g/kg body weight) of intact soya protein (SPI) and soya protein hydrolysate (SPH). Another group of twelve healthy male subjects ingested three doses (0.3, 0.4 and 0.6 g/kg body weight) of intact whey protein (WPI) and whey protein hydrolysate (WPH). Blood was sampled before (t = 0) and 15, 30, 60, 90 and 120 min after protein ingestion for insulin, glucagon and glucose determination. SPI induced a higher total area under the curve for insulin and glucagon than SPH while no difference between WPI and WPH was found. Insulin and glucagon responses increased with increasing protein load for SPI, SPH, WPI and WPH, but [b]the effect was more pronounced for glucagon.[/b] A higher dose of protein or its hydrolysate will result in a lower insulin:glucagon ratio, an important parameter for the control of postprandial substrate metabolism. In conclusion, insulin and glucagon responses were protein and hydrolysate specific.[/quote]

Glucagon secretion and in non diabetics subsequent insulin secretion is in part due to the release of Cholecystokinin (CCK). This digestive hormone stimulates the release of glucagon causing a spike in blood sugar.
Rusty Barbell this release of CCK is actually what stimulates the glucagon release. This is why a meal high in fats will also cause a spike in blood sugar. CCK plays a part in fat digestion and thus causes a glucagon release.

Glucagon secretion and in non diabetics subsequent insulin secretion is in part due to the release of Cholecystokinin (CCK). This digestive hormone stimulates the release of glucagon causing a spike in blood sugar.

Rusty Barbell this release of CCK is actually what stimulates the glucagon release. This is why a meal high in fats will also cause a spike in blood sugar. CCK plays a part in fat digestion and thus causes a glucagon release.

Glucagon secretion and in non diabetics subsequent insulin secretion is in part due to the release of Cholecystokinin (CCK). This digestive hormone stimulates the release of glucagon causing a spike in blood sugar.

Rusty Barbell -
this release of CCK is actually what stimulates the glucagon release. This is why a meal high in fats will also cause a spike in blood sugar. CCK plays a part in fat digestion and thus causes a glucagon release.

[quote]Rusty Barbell wrote:
Some recent research published on this subject. When I first read this months ago it suddenly made sense as to why I, as a type 1 diabetic, would sometimes get enormous rises in blood sugar after eating large doses of whey. It can be particularly troublesome to manage (the glucagon release) sometimes…

Br J Nutr. 2008 Jul;100(1):61-9.

Glucagon and insulin responses after ingestion of different amounts of intact and hydrolysed proteins.

Claessens M, Saris WH, van Baak MA.

Department of Human Biology, Nutrition and Toxicology Research Institute Maastricht (NUTRIM), Maastricht University, PO Box 616, Maastricht 6200, MD, The Netherlands. 

[b]Ingestion of dietary protein is known to induce both insulin and glucagon secretion.[/b] These responses may be affected by the dose and the form (intact or hydrolysed) in which protein is ingested. The aim of the study was to investigate the effect of different amounts of intact protein and protein hydrolysate of a vegetable (soya) and animal (whey) protein on insulin and glucagon responses and to study the effect of increasing protein loads for both intact protein and protein hydrolysate in man. The study employed a repeated-measures design with Latin-square randomisation and single-blind trials. Twelve healthy non-obese males ingested three doses (0.3, 0.4 and 0.6 g/kg body weight) of intact soya protein (SPI) and soya protein hydrolysate (SPH). Another group of twelve healthy male subjects ingested three doses (0.3, 0.4 and 0.6 g/kg body weight) of intact whey protein (WPI) and whey protein hydrolysate (WPH). Blood was sampled before (t = 0) and 15, 30, 60, 90 and 120 min after protein ingestion for insulin, glucagon and glucose determination. SPI induced a higher total area under the curve for insulin and glucagon than SPH while no difference between WPI and WPH was found. Insulin and glucagon responses increased with increasing protein load for SPI, SPH, WPI and WPH, but [b]the effect was more pronounced for glucagon.[/b] A higher dose of protein or its hydrolysate will result in a lower insulin:glucagon ratio, an important parameter for the control of postprandial substrate metabolism. In conclusion, insulin and glucagon responses were protein and hydrolysate specific.[/quote]

Thank you. That was the kind of answer I was looking for.