T Nation

Protein Each Day?

I was reading the beginners articles (t-dawg diet) and I have a question. It says you should strive for 1.5g of protein per lb. of body weight per day. I’m 195 so that’s about 292g per day, how the hell can I get that much protein? I’d have to take a scoop of whey protein at every meal (6 times a day) to get even half of it in plus 30g each meal of regular protein. I feel like I’d being devoting my day to eating. Is this realistic?

How do you guys get your protein in and how much do you eat? Do you follow the l.5g/lb. idea? I’m trying to put on some muscle.

One last thing, how can you tell if a food has BCAA’s in it or not? I’ve heard chocolate milk does but I don’t know how to tell. Forgive me if I’m just stupid but I don’t even know what BCAA’s are other than some type of amino acids.

All protein has BCAA’s, but the amount varies from food to food. Also there are BCAA supplements, that only consists of the Branched Chain Amino Acids (leucine, valine, and isoleucine). Amino acids are the building blocks of protein

[quote]astinite wrote:
I was reading the beginners articles (t-dawg diet) and I have a question. It says you should strive for 1.5g of protein per lb. of body weight per day. I’m 195 so that’s about 292g per day, how the hell can I get that much protein? I’d have to take a scoop of whey protein at every meal (6 times a day) to get even half of it in plus 30g each meal of regular protein. I feel like I’d being devoting my day to eating. Is this realistic?

How do you guys get your protein in and how much do you eat? Do you follow the l.5g/lb. idea? I’m trying to put on some muscle.

One last thing, how can you tell if a food has BCAA’s in it or not? I’ve heard chocolate milk does but I don’t know how to tell. Forgive me if I’m just stupid but I don’t even know what BCAA’s are other than some type of amino acids.[/quote]

If you want to substantially increase muscle mass that amount of protein is the reality. That’s why not everyone is successful at this goal it isn’t easy. Yes, if you want to be a winner at this you will have to buck up and plan ahead. Pre-preparation of meals and getting into the habit of eating thirty to forty grams of protein per meal and the appropriate amount of healthy carbs and fats is again the reality. This is to achieve substantial increases in muscle mass. You can do it or not your choice.

Good luck,

D

[quote]astinite wrote:
I was reading the beginners articles (t-dawg diet) and I have a question. It says you should strive for 1.5g of protein per lb. of body weight per day. I’m 195 so that’s about 292g per day, how the hell can I get that much protein? I’d have to take a scoop of whey protein at every meal (6 times a day) to get even half of it in plus 30g each meal of regular protein. I feel like I’d being devoting my day to eating. Is this realistic?[/quote]

It’s not only realistic, it’s easy. Four oz of chicken and a large glass of non-fat milk (2 cups) is 52 grams of protein.

Or a protein shake and 4 egg whites. I buy the 60 egg flats and hard boil all of them. It’s easy to throw away the yolks I don’t want. (I eat one yolk a day).

It really isn’t that hard if you put a little planning into it. Lots of us do it every day.

Don’t forget, bodybuilding is a sport that you participate in 24 hrs. a day.

Bullshit. Protein intake is for more important when dieting or on low to moderate caloried diets. If you are looking to get big and strong, which seems to be the general goal around here, you will do fine with calories in general. Even half that much protein may suffice. Sure it is nice to err on the plus side, but protein IS expensive.

Randy

[quote]Randy Smith wrote:
Sure it is nice to err on the plus side, but protein IS expensive.[/quote]

Whey is cheap. I buy the 6 lb bags that Costco carries for $23.49, which works out to 1.1 cents per gram of protein. I drink 200 grams of whey protein a day for less than what many people pay for their Starbucks fix.

Eggs, lowfat cottage cheese, canned tuna and salmon can all come in at less than 2 cents per gram of protein, if you’re careful to buy them when they’re on sale.

Would it be worth having albumin levels measured to help to determine optional level of protein intake thus not overeating protein and it having no affect?