T Nation

Progressive Overload Advice, Only Big Plates

Hi guys,

I’m looking for some progressive overload pointers.

I’ve recently moved and got a new gym. The facility is amazing - brand new Rogue everything, etc - it looks and ‘feels’ fantastic. However, I’ve found the downside - the smallest plates are 5kg (c.11 pounds).

I’ve previously been a huge fan ouf 5/3/1 and found that being told precisely what to lift was a massive help. I’ve always struggled to progress and spun my wheels when I’ve tried to go myself in a linear way. That said, I’m miles away from the point where I’m “too advanced” for a linear program.

Any advice on solid (and fairly prescriptive if possible!) progressive overload schemes without the smaller plates? Would 5/3/1 and rounding to the nearest 5kg work?!

Thanks!

Jim

Yes.

Thank you - is that a ‘yes’ to rounding?

I’ve noticed this has been moved to the 5/3/1 forum. This was a general progressive overload scheme question rather than a 5/3/1 query. The point was that I’d enjoyed 5/3/1 style ‘prescriptiveness’. Happy for it to be here if it fits, but seems like people could add more in the Beginners forum?

Take some smaller plates with you. Being smaller they arent that hard to carry around. Problem solved

I would just round down. With 5kg/11lb plates you’re limited to 10kg/22lb jumps. That’s not nothing, so like I said, I would get the exact weights 5/3/1 (or whatever program) prescribes, and then round down to the nearest weight you’re able to. Better to have slightly lighter weight and dominate it then rounding up and struggling on a program that relies on submax weight.

I believe Dan John mentioned something once about only using 25lb and 45lb plates when lifting - it forces you to really own a weight before moving up, since your jumps will be so big. Not saying you have to do this - I use and enjoy 5/3/1 as well, but just as an example of small plates not being 100% necessary.

This is the obvious solution. You can pick up a pair of 5lb./2.5kg plates at a sporting goods store for less than $10. They don’t need to be fancy calibrated plates, and they’re light enough to just carry in your gym bag.

1 Like