T Nation

Programming Question


#1

Currently I am doing Candito's 6 week program and enjoy it.
I would consider myself a beginner at the moment since Strength Standards
show that I am over half way through to achieve intermediate stage.

I encountered an issue of doing deadlifts right after squats. Now, while I squat
high bar, I started to use weightlifting shoes which seem to engage glutes more and
so they get tired after squating. My deadlifts after squats seem to suffer from that
and I want to request advice on how to change things up.

Typical upper body day looks like this:
* Bench Press
* Dumbbell Row
* Seated dumbbell OHP
* Pull ups
* Random accessories like pushdowns

Typical lower body day:
* Squat
* Deadlift(some variations of it)
* Hip thrusts(I have anterior pelvic tilt and try to strengthen glutes)
* Scooby's Rotisory workout for core(trying to fix anterior pelvic tilt once again)

I was thinking about Squating, thrusting, benching and doing core exercises on leg day
and then replace bench press on upper body day with deadlifts, doing them as a first lift.

Is it smart to do this or you know a better way?


#2

When you say that your deadlift “suffers”, what do you mean? What is your change in programming attempting to fix?


#3

Suffers => My posterior chain gets fatigued so I tend to lift either less reps or less weight than if I haven’t squated before. However, I also get tired after squats so that contributes as well.

The change would enable me to deadlift without any prior muscle work so I should be able to lift more weight or more reps.


#4

[quote]Pterodactylus wrote:
Suffers => My posterior chain gets fatigued so I tend to lift either less reps or less weight than if I haven’t squated before. However, I also get tired after squats so that contributes as well.

The change would enable me to deadlift without any prior muscle work so I should be able to lift more weight or more reps.[/quote]

I believe you’re fixating too much on the number on the bar and assuming that this number correlates to you getting bigger/stronger.

Keep in mind that deadlifting in a fatigued stated is still making you stronger, you’re just witnessing less weight on the bar. As you’ve already observed, when you AREN’T fatigued, you ARE able to lift more. Thus, if you get stronger on your deadlift in a fatigued state, it will mean also having a stronger deadlift in a NON-fatigued state.

You’re never going to be 100% fresh for every single movement in a routine, but as long as the conditions that you train each movement remain constant (ie: you always train deadlifts after squats), as long as you are witnessing increases in those movements, you are getting stronger overall.

I do not feel you need to change your programming to meet your goals.


#5

Big Kaz liked to squat first one day, then deadlift first the other day.

Try warming up with some clam shells, or seated abductions and then some leg curls on lower body day. Wear that belt and brace properly to address that APT.


#6

[quote]T3hPwnisher wrote:
Keep in mind that deadlifting in a fatigued stated is still making you stronger, you’re just witnessing less weight on the bar. As you’ve already observed, when you AREN’T fatigued, you ARE able to lift more. Thus, if you get stronger on your deadlift in a fatigued state, it will mean also having a stronger deadlift in a NON-fatigued state.

I do not feel you need to change your programming to meet your goals. [/quote]
This.

As far as APT goes, strengthening your glutes and abs is never a bad idea but make sure that your quads aren’t glued together. You can strengthen as much as you want but if your quads don’t loosen up a little you might not get many results, at least that’s been my experience.


#7

[quote]FlatsFarmer wrote:
Big Kaz liked to squat first one day, then deadlift first the other day.

Try warming up with some clam shells, or seated abductions and then some leg curls on lower body day. Wear that belt and brace properly to address that APT. [/quote]

Thats how I have been doing it, go heavy on one and light on the other.


#8

[quote]T3hPwnisher wrote:
I believe you’re fixating too much on the number on the bar and assuming that this number correlates to you getting bigger/stronger.

Keep in mind that deadlifting in a fatigued stated is still making you stronger, you’re just witnessing less weight on the bar. As you’ve already observed, when you AREN’T fatigued, you ARE able to lift more. Thus, if you get stronger on your deadlift in a fatigued state, it will mean also having a stronger deadlift in a NON-fatigued state.

You’re never going to be 100% fresh for every single movement in a routine, but as long as the conditions that you train each movement remain constant (ie: you always train deadlifts after squats), as long as you are witnessing increases in those movements, you are getting stronger overall.

I do not feel you need to change your programming to meet your goals. [/quote]

x2


#9

[quote]lift206 wrote:

[quote]T3hPwnisher wrote:
I believe you’re fixating too much on the number on the bar and assuming that this number correlates to you getting bigger/stronger.

Keep in mind that deadlifting in a fatigued stated is still making you stronger, you’re just witnessing less weight on the bar. As you’ve already observed, when you AREN’T fatigued, you ARE able to lift more. Thus, if you get stronger on your deadlift in a fatigued state, it will mean also having a stronger deadlift in a NON-fatigued state.

You’re never going to be 100% fresh for every single movement in a routine, but as long as the conditions that you train each movement remain constant (ie: you always train deadlifts after squats), as long as you are witnessing increases in those movements, you are getting stronger overall.

I do not feel you need to change your programming to meet your goals. [/quote]

x2
[/quote]

x3


#10

[quote]FlatsFarmer wrote:
Big Kaz liked to squat first one day, then deadlift first the other day.

[/quote]
x2 just do this


#11

I think you should do the routine as written. Lower your working weight if you are struggling. You’re a self identified beginner.