T Nation

Program Question/Check

Quick check of my very simple program if you might?

History:
2 months since last workout.
I am beginning a martial art and plan to run a 10km race in 1 month.
The 10km race is a fun run - I am not competing and running is not my prime goal (but I’d like to be able to finish in a respectable time - under 60 minutes).
Gym goal is to increase strength/lift heavier shit than before.

Monday evening:
Deadlifts (working up to 1RM)
Exercise X
Exercise X

Tuesday morning:
3km run
Tuesday evening:
Dojo

Wednesday evening:
Bench Press (working up to 1RM)
Exercise X
Exercise X

Thursday morning:
5km run
Thursday evening:
Dojo

Friday:
OFF

Saturday morning:
Squats (working up to 1RM)
Exercise X
Exercise X

Sunday morning:
10km run

Notes: I will not be going straight back to my previous 1RM maxes - I’ll take a few weeks and work up (hopefully quickly).
I think the plan is a little ambitious but nothing crazy (got to fit work and study and fun in my week somewhere as well).

Question: What should my Exercise X’s be? Anything obviously wrong?

EDIT: Simplicity is the name of the game for me right now as well.

I would definitely reccomend not putting squats right in front of the 10km run because if you return to those after a while you won’t be running at all, let alone respectably fast the next day.

Also, its a bit much to ask for a total program design, look into Westside for Skinny bastards and The Shotgun method for some ideas that might interest you.

As a beginner, I got more out of higher rep sets than singles. I would not work up to a max weight, but instead do sets of 4-6 (arbitrary number- I also got good results on sets of 10, but I lack the patience to slog through ten reps, especially when it’s not challenging until the last four).

Some ideas:
Monday, do a horizontal push-pull. bench/row.

Wednesday, do some single-leg work: lunges, or one-legged squats.

Saturday, do some vertical push-pull: chinups and military presses.

Accessory work (^^^) should be done at higher rep-ranges and not too taxing. Two or three sets should be enough, and stop short of failure.