Problems with Floor Press

I have a weird issue that’s been going on for a while when I’m trying to floor press. My left elbow may be smaller than my right. That is, it’s completely noticeable because my right elbow hits the floor much earlier than my left. This causes a great imbalance and it makes the weight much harder to push. Does anyone else have this problem? What can be done about it?

Also, off topic but still about floor pressing - should I tuck my elbows as if it were a normal bench press?

thanks

[quote]KnjazVovk wrote:
I have a weird issue that’s been going on for a while when I’m trying to floor press. My left elbow may be smaller than my right. That is, it’s completely noticeable because my right elbow hits the floor much earlier than my left. This causes a great imbalance and it makes the weight much harder to push. Does anyone else have this problem? What can be done about it?[/quote]

Much earlier? Like, more than a fraction of a second? Barring any physical deformities, I’d chalk it up just to inconsistent bar control. You could go through the trouble of measuring your upper arm circumference and forearm length to note any actual difference… or… when you’re pressing, you could focus on keep the bar on a level plane so that both sides are moving at the same pace. A spotter would help with this.

When you dumbbell press, is one arm stronger than the other?

More often than not, yep. The advantages of improved pressing power and shoulder safety don’t change much just because we’re on the floor.

Also, do you have any elbow or shoulder problems (tennis elbow, hurt rotator cuff, etc).

eh, I wanted to bump this as I was thinking of trying it tonight instead of regular bench - the back of my shoulder is feeling pretty tender (rotator cuff?)

Is the floor press supposed to be easier on the shoulders*? And also should the shoulders be retracted for this?

*if no, any other suggestions of some kind of replacement movement that is?

The shoulder isn’t stretched as much as in bench pressing, so it’s easier on the shoulders in that sense. I’d retract the shoulder blades.

And be careful. Even though the ROM is smaller, you might still be a lot weaker on floor presses.

My right elbow connects with the floor and I find it hard to touch with my left.

It is clearly to do with differences in internal and external rotation on the respective shoulders. I have an internal rotation deficit on my right shoulder ie it is more externally rotated. The reverse is true with the left. Therefore my body is rotated slightly towards the right. I don’t think this is uncommon.

I think it is largely responsible for differences in strength between my right and left side. On dumbbell pressing I always fail first on the right - this, presumably, is because the excessively externally rotated position of my right shoulder means I have an increased range of motion on that side ie the weight has to move further.

To Original Poster - that is what is your problem I’m guessing. You need to increase internal rotation at your right shoulder and increase external rotation on your left. Eric Cressey is helpful with this problem.