T Nation

Problems with D3 or DHEA?

I am seeing a new Anti Aging Doc, and he put me on a 50mg DHEA, and 5000iu D3 daily. It has been about 2 weeks and In the last week I started feeling worse then I have in several years. I have read that DHEA can convert to E2. Anyone expernce bad side effects from these?

[quote]cobra003 wrote:
I am seeing a new Anti Aging Doc, and he put me on a 50mg DHEA, and 5000iu D3 daily. It has been about 2 weeks and In the last week I started feeling worse then I have in several years. I have read that DHEA can convert to E2. Anyone expernce bad side effects from these?[/quote]

Qualify your statement “I started feeling worse then I have in several years.”

Did you break out in hives, did you vomit, did your throat swell? Qualify your statement.

I have never had ill effects from taking DHEA or vitamin D3.

Yeah sorry. I have been on Test Cyp, for 2 years and added HCG several months ago and have been feeling better then I have in years. Now since I started the D3 and DHEA with in 2 weeks I am very anxious, depression, overall poor mood, loss of morning erections.

Stop the DHEA for a month, note changes and see if you can get back where you were. Then try 25mg EOD and see if that causes a problem. For some guys, they freely convert DHEA–>E2. No way to know in advance. You could first test E2 so you have some hard data.

Your many threads is a PIA.

What is the benifit of taking DHEA along with Test? I don’t really understand.

It could be either DHEA or D3. Both make me feel miserable. But my bet would be it’s the DHEA.

But why are you asking here? It should be very easy to check which one it is - just cut out one or the other and you should feel better in a couple of days if it was that.

Cobra, many guys have lower levels of DHEA and DHEA plays many roles in the body. It is important for brain function and arterial health. When you take T, you are not relying on DHEA–>T, but still need DHEA.

DHEA levels start to drop when people are in their 30’s. For women, declining progesterone levels fall in a similar manner.

TRT without hCG can lower pregnenolone which then reduces pregnenolone–>DHEA in the adrenals. Production of downstream hormones in the adrenals is not controlled but is open loop. These effects normally are of no consequence in men. However in women the increase of adrenal DHEA–>T can have a significant effect.

LEF.org wrote:
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In 1981, Life Extension introduced dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) in an article that described the multiple anti-aging effects of this steroid hormone. At the time, DHEA replacement therapy was almost unheard of. Today, DHEA replacement therapy has been studied extensively, and decreased DHEA levels have been implicated in heart disease, high cholesterol, depression, inflammation, immune disorders, schizophrenia, Alzheimer’s disease, diabetes, HIV, and osteoporosis (Hauffa 1984; Valenti 2002; Valenti 2004).

What is DHEA, and how does it work? DHEA is the most common steroid hormone in the body. It is produced mainly by the adrenal glands, and to a lesser extent, elsewhere in the body (including fat cells). DHEA is metabolized from pregnenolone, the body’s ?master hormone,? which itself is metabolized from cholesterol. DHEA can be metabolized into other sex hormones, including testosterone, estrogens, and up to 150 individual metabolites.

Although there are still important research questions to answer, there is no question that youthful DHEA levels are closely associated with good health, and that low levels have been connected to various diseases. Unfortunately, after about age 35, DHEA begins to decline (Pavlov 1986; Nafziger 1998). Women, who tend to have lower levels, lose DHEA much more quickly than men as they age. Concentrations remain roughly 30% higher in men (Orentreich 1984). DHEA levels also vary according to ethnicity (Orentreich 1984; LaCroix 1992; Hornsby 1995). By age 70, DHEA levels may be only 20% of young-adult levels (Belanger 1994).
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