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Prime Time: WunderBarr

Here’s a question for YOU. How do you react when someone tells, not asks, you that creatine or protein is bad for your kidneys, or liver or [insert your favorite organ here]?

[quote]David Barr wrote:
Here’s a question for YOU. How do you react when someone tells, not asks, you that creatine or protein is bad for your kidneys, or liver or [insert your favorite organ here]?[/quote]

I’m on the Anabolic Diet and one of my work mates told me “All that protein is bad for your kidneys”.

“Are you a qualified sports nutritionist?” I asked him.

“No”.

“Well shut the fuck up then”.

I’m a people person.

LOL Massif, I like that!

I guess everyone else is off debating Religion vs. Science.

[quote]Massif wrote:
“Are you a qualified sports nutritionist?” I asked him.

“No”.

“Well shut the fuck up then”.

I’m a people person.[/quote]

What’s going on Mr GoodBarr?

How was DC?

Dave,

I was curious about your thoughts on the following study:

Mechanism of amino acid-induced skeletal muscle insulin resistance in humans.

Krebs M, Krssak M, Bernroider E, Anderwald C, Brehm A, Meyerspeer M, Nowotny P, Roth E, Waldhausl W, Roden M.

Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Department of Internal Medicine III, University of Vienna Medical School, Vienna, Austria.

Plasma concentrations of amino acids are frequently elevated in insulin-resistant states, and a protein-enriched diet can impair glucose metabolism. This study examined effects of short-term plasma amino acid (AA) elevation on whole-body glucose disposal and cellular insulin action in skeletal muscle. Seven healthy men were studied for 5.5 h during euglycemic (5.5 mmol/l), hyperinsulinemic (430 pmol/l), fasting glucagon (65 ng/l), and growth hormone (0.4 microg/l) somatostatin clamp tests in the presence of low (approximately 1.6 mmol/l) and increased (approximately 4.6 mmol/l) plasma AA concentrations.

Glucose turnover was measured with D-[6,6-(2)H(2)]glucose. Intramuscular concentrations of glycogen and glucose-6-phosphate (G6P) were monitored using (13)C and (31)P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, respectively. A approximately 2.1-fold elevation of plasma AAs reduced whole-body glucose disposal by 25% (P < 0.01).

Rates of muscle glycogen synthesis decreased by 64% (180–315 min, 24 plus minus 3; control, 67 plus minus 10 micromol center dot l(-1) center dot min(-1); P < 0.01), which was accompanied by a reduction in G6P starting at 130 min (DeltaG6P(260–300 min), 18 plus minus 19; control, 103 plus minus 33 micromol/l; P < 0.05). In conclusion, plasma amino acid elevation induces skeletal muscle insulin resistance in humans by inhibition of glucose transport/phosphorylation, resulting in marked reduction of glycogen synthesis

[quote]David Barr wrote:
LOL Massif, I like that!

I guess everyone else is off debating Religion vs. Science.

[/quote]

Debating Religion vs. Science is mental masturbation. They are effectively pitting a logical arguement against a moral one, and logically, you can never use logic against an arguement based on emotion or faith. One requires proof, and one requires belief despite a lack of proof.

I was reading a thread on the Warrior Diet yesterday, and it had some pretty interesting information on there. I’m definitely not thinking of trying something like, but what is your take on the whole “eat once a day like a madman and you’ll be a hard bastard” philosophy?

Dr. Ryan, DC was great, but Philll kept trying to steal my money like he did to you in Vegas.

Any suggestions?

There are several great PM questions that are worthwhile discussing here.

Q: 1) Why when in a state of free radical accumulation (post workout) should we not take Vitamin C and E? I’m not talking about mega doses, maybe just 350-500mg Vit. C and 200-400IU Vit E. How exactly does this hurt our progress. Wouldn’t we want to get rid of these free-radicals as they cause more cell damage to already damaged cells that we’re trying to repair???

This thinking isn’t completely incorrect, but when antioxidants are consumed in excess they become oxidative themselves. In other words, they become the very thing we are trying to avoid by taking them!

As for the smaller dosages mentioned above, we don’t have any data on that. I believe that smaller dosages are fine, but can’t imagine that the benefit is great enough to warrant the risk.

BSUbird, this one is right up my alley because it’s similar to a research project I worked on. We got to infuse all kinds of crazy crap into people, while examining their protein synthesis and insulin sensitivity. Pretty cool.

Anyway, we didn’t find that effect with an amino acid drink. Couple that with resistance exercise and there’s no problem at all.

Great question!

[quote]BSUbird wrote:
Dave,

I was curious about your thoughts on the following study:

Mechanism of amino acid-induced skeletal muscle insulin resistance in humans.[/quote]

Massif, that diet directly contradicts what I know about maintaining muscle mass in the face of starvation -which is essentially what we want to do while cutting.

There may be a trick or two of which I may not be aware of, but they had better be of David Blaine magnitude.

Good question.

[quote]Massif wrote:
I was reading a thread on the Warrior Diet yesterday, and it had some pretty interesting information on there. I’m definitely not thinking of trying something like, but what is your take on the whole “eat once a day like a madman and you’ll be a hard bastard” philosophy?[/quote]

  1. We’ve established that GH is no big deal post workout, but in the article you said to wait approx. 1 hour to drink your post workout Surge. Why is this? Wouldn’t we want to level off cortisol as soon as possible and provide AA’s quickly? you said in the article that the research says that protein synthesis is greater if we wait.

I think this has created more confusion than anything. Although I compared two studies, I never suggested that waiting an hour for your post workout drink was a good idea. In fact, on several occasions I have mentioned that this is a bad idea.

I really wish we knew why it seems better to wait, but we just don’t know.

Break time for 22 hours. In other words, I’ll be back tomorrow.

Let’s get those questions ready! :wink:

BTW-I like dogs.

[quote]David Barr wrote:
Break time for 22 hours. In other words, I’ll be back tomorrow.

Let’s get those questions ready! :wink:

BTW-I like dogs.[/quote]

Well… I’m glad you are ready.

muhhhaaa

-Get Lifted

I’m back and ready to answer questions.

Here’s my nightly question: should I get a subscription to Armchair General magazine?

http://www.armchairgeneral.com/

Barraka from mortal kombat thinks this would be a better magazine to subscribe to. :-0

www.2600.com

History and war is extremely interesting I might check that mag out myself.

Anywho,

I am at the point that I am going to add some more kcal this week and am curious what to add.(Macronutrients) So maybe I could Barrrrrow some knowledge and get a recommendation on whether it would be a good idea to add carbs, fat, or protein for the 250kcal adjustment in JB’s decision making matrix model for my meal plan. For me, there seems to be some confusion on what to add for nutrients. Sometimes he recommends increasing carbs at 250kcal (DVD) In the ME articles he introduces fats for a 250kcal adjustment. I noticed that the increase in this book are nearly all fat adjustments. Walnuts, peanut butter, cashews. etc.

I am curious to know whether I would do carbs, fats, or protein for the kcal increase and curious to know which one to use and why. Surely, there would be a reason to add one over the other for certain individuals. Wether it be for recovery or what not. Then I would be curious to know which one would likely be right for me.

-Get Lifted

OMG. They are doing a PBS show or movie for guns, germs and steel. It’s my favorite book ever! OMG, thanks for the link Barrzerk.

-Get Lifted

GL, why are you adding the Cals? What are your short term goals? What’s your current Cal intake and Nutrient breakdown?

Unless you’re low on CHO’s (eg while bulking) or becoming an endurance athlete, it’s likely not carbs. Let me know.

BTW-I’m sure you hate when people answer questions with other questions. LOL

-D

[quote]Get Lifted wrote:
I am at the point that I am going to add some more kcal this week and am curious what to add.(Macronutrients) So maybe I could Barrrrrow some knowledge and get a recommendation on whether it would be a good idea to add carbs, fat, or protein for the 250kcal adjustment in JB’s decision making matrix model for my meal plan. For me, there seems to be some confusion on what to add for nutrients. Sometimes he recommends increasing carbs at 250kcal (DVD) In the ME articles he introduces fats for a 250kcal adjustment. I noticed that the increase in this book are nearly all fat adjustments. Walnuts, peanut butter, cashews. etc.-Get Lifted[/quote]

Here’s the more common comment I always hear:

“Yeah, but if I stop taking it, will my gains dissapear?”

[quote]David Barr wrote:
Here’s a question for YOU. How do you react when someone tells, not asks, you that creatine or protein is bad for your kidneys, or liver or [insert your favorite organ here]?[/quote]

Here’s a scary thought; researchers, after demonstrating that long term creatine supplementation is safe, suggest to use it under the supervision of a medical doctor.

“Recently, controlled studies made to integrate the existing knowledge based on anecdotal reports on the side effects of creatine have indicated that, in healthy subjects, oral supplementation with creatine, even with long-term dosage, may be considered an effective and safe ergogenic aid. However, athletes should be educated as to proper dosing or to take creatine under medical supervision.”

I wonder what MD’s know about creatine use… I’m sure they have a full semester devoted to sports supplementation in Med School. Maybe not.

Having worked and taken classes with MD’s, I am even more bothered by that assumption.

Taking what Coach Staley wrote and running with it… I used to wonder why studies performed on creatine supplementation showed no changes in bodyweight, when subjects STOPPED their creatine use.

I mean, it makes sense that we quickly blow up with water when starting creatine, so we should also quickly deflate when we stop.

Of course it takes a month or so for creatine levels to drop back to normal, so the water-weight loss is far more gradual. This is why, to my knowledge, it had never been reported.

BTW-Coach, that’s just scary. How do you react when you hear that?

[quote]CharlesStaley wrote:
Here’s the more common comment I always hear:

“Yeah, but if I stop taking it, will my gains dissapear?”[/quote]