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Prime Time Q: To All Coaches!

Hi everyone

Sorry I can’t be in Prime Time today; I’m in the UK and the time difference is significant.

I wanted to ask your opinions on good books related to sports and nutrition.

I’m not looking for any programs etc… but more towards the science of Physiology in sports and the like. It would be super nice for it to be more resistance training based; though that is not a main priority.

Also the same (science related) for Nutrition based aspects regarding to sports…

Furthermore… I have seen some books regarding the Psychology in competitions etc. Any good books there that immidiatedly spring to mind?

I know this question has been asked before in the forum, but everyday new books are coming out and perhaps there are groundbreaking books out there on such matters.

I had a look around the Human Kinetics line, but there are many titles and my budget (being a student) is limited!

Thanks!

In terms of training, if I had to throw away every book but one, I’d keep Science And Practice Of Strength Training by Zatsiorsky.

Nutritionally, a tougher call, but Berardi’s books and DVD’s are very very good - a great mix of science and practice.

[quote]fragfeaster777 wrote:
Hi everyone

Sorry I can’t be in Prime Time today; I’m in the UK and the time difference is significant.

I wanted to ask your opinions on good books related to sports and nutrition.

I’m not looking for any programs etc… but more towards the science of Physiology in sports and the like. It would be super nice for it to be more resistance training based; though that is not a main priority.

Also the same (science related) for Nutrition based aspects regarding to sports…

Furthermore… I have seen some books regarding the Psychology in competitions etc. Any good books there that immidiatedly spring to mind?

I know this question has been asked before in the forum, but everyday new books are coming out and perhaps there are groundbreaking books out there on such matters.

I had a look around the Human Kinetics line, but there are many titles and my budget (being a student) is limited!

Thanks!
[/quote]

Here’s a partial list of some of the books on my shelf; I’m in the process of compiling it so that I can keep track of what I have! Some are e-books, others are print-outs of e-books colleagues and I have purchased together. Some are books I’ve bought solely for illustrations to use in articles and explaining things to clients. Just the tip of the iceberg, really.

Kinetic Anatomy by Behnke

Release Your Pain by Abelson et al.

Sports Injury Management by Anderson et al.

Basic Biomechanics (4th Ed.) by Hall

Brunnstrom’s Clinical Kinesiology by Smith et al.

Manual of Structural Kinesiology by Thompson and Floyd

Training for Speed, Agility, and Quickness by Brown/Ferrigno/Santana

The Strength Coach’s Playbook by Kenn

Total Body Functional Profile by Gray

Fundamentals of Orthopedics by Saunders

McMinn’s Atlas of Human Anatomy (5th Ed.) by Abrahams et al.

Essential Clinical Anatomy (2nd Ed.) by Moore and Agur

Performing in Extreme Environments by Armstrong

The Science of Martial Arts Training by Staley

Human Anatomy and Physiology by Marieb

The Poliquin Principles by Poliquin

Modern Trends in Strength Training by Poliquin

Ultimate Diet 2.0 PDF by MacDonald

Theory and Applications of Modern Strength and Power Methods by Thibaudeau

Strength Training Anatomy by Delavier

The Westside Seminar Manual and Videos by Tate and Simmons

Strength Training for Sport by Kraemer

Nancy Clark’s Sports Nutrition Guidebook (worst book ever) by Clark

Supertraining (5th Ed.) by Siff

Essentials of Strength and Conditioning (2nd Ed.) Baechle and Earle

Facts and Fallacies of Fitness by Siff

Exercise Physiology: Theory and Application to Fitness and Performance (4th Ed.) by Powers and Howley

Optimal Muscle Training by Kinakin

Mastery of Hand Strength by Brookfield

Elite Fitness Dynamic Squat Manual by Tate and Simmons

Elite Fitness Training with Bands Manual by Tate and Simmons

Clinician’s Guide to Diagnosis by Desai

Sport Mechanics for Coaches by Carr

Ultimate Back Fitness and Performance by McGill

Training for Warriors by Marty Rooney

Maxcondition by Jamie Hale

Jumping into Plyometrics by Chu

Fundamentals of Special Strength-Training in Sport by Verkhoshansky

The Esgocue Method of Health Through Motion by Esgocuse (photocopied)

Science of Sports Training by Kurz

Facilitated Stretching (2nd Ed.) by McAtee and Charland

The Trigger Point Therapy Workbook by Davies

Bigger, Faster, Stronger by Shepard

Managing the Training of Weightlifters

Complete Conditioning for Baseball (hand-me-down)

Complete Conditioning for Soccer (hand-me-down)

The Endless Web: Fascial Anatomy and Physical Reality

Science and Pratice of Strength Training by Vladimir Zatsiorsky

Strength and Power in Sport, edited by Paavo Komi for The Encyclopedia of Sports Medicine of the IOC, 2002 (THIS ONE IS AWESOME)

Qualitative Analysis of Human Movement by Knudson

Mechanics of Sport: A Practitioner?s Guide by Carr

The Neuroscience of Human Movement by
Leonard

Biomechanical Basis of Human Movement by Hamill

PNF in Practice by Beckers

Scrawny to Brawny by Mejia and Berardi (I’m quoted in it, so I got a freebie; woohoo!)

I’m pretty sure that I’m forgetting a bunch of stuff. There are a lot of old magazines and course readings kicking around my place, too.

Damn EC since we’re both in CT how about you lend me some of those?

If you have EC’s collection, you’ll be fine. BTW, EC, how is the Gary Gray book? Worth the $$$? I hadn’t seen it before.

Stay strong
MR

[quote]bigpump23 wrote:
Damn EC since we’re both in CT how about you lend me some of those?
[/quote]

Didn’t even know you were in Connecticut; what city?

[quote]Mike Robertson wrote:
If you have EC’s collection, you’ll be fine. BTW, EC, how is the Gary Gray book? Worth the $$$? I hadn’t seen it before.

Stay strong
MR[/quote]

Not too shabby. I actually had to buy it for a course with Dr. Tiberio. It’s a very good assessment tool, but you need to be able to understand the premises behind the assessments and draw conclusions based on functional anatomy. Otherwise, it’s just a bunch of pictures!

EC, how the hell do you have any time to lift if you have read all those books? That is one impressive list of literature! You could set up the “EC Sports Book Library” or something like that…

Oh, a few more I forgot:

The Stress of Life by Selye

Gourmet Nutrition by Berardi

The Charlie Francis Training System by Francis

Speed Trap by Francis

[quote]bg100 wrote:
EC, how the hell do you have any time to lift if you have read all those books? That is one impressive list of literature! You could set up the “EC Sports Book Library” or something like that…[/quote]

Admittedly, a few of them are future projects. I like to stay ahead of things; I’ll buy a half dozen books every three months or so and read them when I can. As a general rule of thumb, I try to read for at least an hour per day; it may be books or online.

Eric,
I’ve posted this to some other trainers but bigpump23 suggested you might have some insights.
I’m 6’6" and 283lbs. My upper legs and hammies are big, BUT… my lower quad is small in comparison.

Any advice on getting my lower quad (VM) to grow?
I don’t have access to a leg press because we workout at home.
I do go “ass to grass” on all squats. Any help would be very appreciated.
Thanks

One book…and there seem to be few left that were not mentioned…is Maffetone’s “Everybody is an Athlete.” I think it is the book that (and I really don’t agree with the training, but, still, he forces you to think it through) I like is that he changed the whole diet paradigm for me.

Tommy Kono’s book on weightlifting…a true labor of love…should be on your shelf. Buy it from him. (Weightlifting, Olympic Style)

Did I mention “Arnold: The Education of a Bodybuilder?” Just one of those darn books that you laugh at sometimes and bow to at others. He gets it right…a lot.

Finally, sneak into the archives here and read “Eat like a Man” and Shug’s thing on abs…worth the time…I think both are from 1999.

A couple of other books that oddly helped me on my journey: “Dune,” “The Sword in the Stone,” and “The Count of Monte Cristo.” They all…not shocking if you know me…emphasize l-e-a-r-n-i-n-g.

“Nancy Clark’s Sports Nutrition Guidebook (worst book ever) by Clark”

Glad I’m not the only one who thought that. Same woman who once wrote an article about how a bananna is better than a protein shake.

On the books…Science and Practice
-Managing the training of Weightlifters
-The Strongest Shall Survive by bill starr

-Fats that heal, fats that kill by Dr. Udo
-Anything my Dr. Mario DiPasquale or Lonnie Lowery

Unfortunately, your only option is to go back in time and pick different parents! :frowning:

There isn’t any such thing as the lower quad. Sure, the vastus medialis sits a bit lower than the other three muscles of the quads, but it’s tough to make appreciable changes if you naturally have long tendons and short muscle bellies. This is generally the case with taller individuals, although you definitely have the advantage in terms of being allowed on amusement park rides at young ages - not to mention attaining glory from rescuing cats from trees.

Sorry I couldn’t give you better news, although I’ll give you all the credit in the world for being a tall guy who squats ATG! The leg press is just a cop-out for a lot of people in your situation.

[quote]MountainDog wrote:
Eric,
I’ve posted this to some other trainers but bigpump23 suggested you might have some insights.
I’m 6’6" and 283lbs. My upper legs and hammies are big, BUT… my lower quad is small in comparison.

Any advice on getting my lower quad (VM) to grow?
I don’t have access to a leg press because we workout at home.
I do go “ass to grass” on all squats. Any help would be very appreciated.
Thanks [/quote]

hi EC

do u do any online coaching or training? if so how does someone get in touch with you ?

Strength and Power in Sport by PV Komi, is the best book you can get without requiring a PhD to understand it. While it’s certainly scientific, it does a GREAT job of explaining everything (great pics too!).

It should be manditory reading for T-Nation members.

Best book Barr-none!

[quote]Eric Cressey wrote:
Didn’t even know you were in Connecticut; what city?[/quote]

Stamford, ever been?

Recommend to skin through each book or fully ready each book?

[quote]kpd315 wrote:
hi EC

do u do any online coaching or training? if so how does someone get in touch with you ?[/quote]

Yes; a fair amount. You can shoot me an email at ericcressey@hotmail.com.

[quote]David Barr wrote:
Strength and Power in Sport by PV Komi, is the best book you can get without requiring a PhD to understand it. While it’s certainly scientific, it does a GREAT job of explaining everything (great pics too!).

It should be manditory reading for T-Nation members.

Best book Barr-none![/quote]

Agreed! Just be very careful with interpreting the Gollhofer chapter on proprioception, as I’ve learned over the past three weeks. The German studies that he cites have several crucial methodological flaws that tend to be covered up in the very brief methods write-ups. I had to email the investigators to get the real scoop so that I could properly take them into account for my thesis.