T Nation

President Bolsonaro in Brazil


#21

It is my understanding that it is exploding. Right now.


#22

We are in the twilight zone where the remnants of good policing keep a cage on it. It won’t last.

But for our exceptional emergency services, we’d have a murder rate at US levels. I expect it to rise to that level.

That’s not a dig on the US, for the record. You geographically can not replicate the preventative policing of the beat cop in the way that it was set up by Peel.

The UK had the greatest police force on earth until the 80’s.


#23

With less cops than we have now, the UK put a man on every 2 blocks of street. As a result we had a murder rate that was practically non-existent.

Per capita, ‘cops’ have increased, but the methodology of policing has become a joke.


#24

In my opinion, police should be a preventative force. This requires boots on the ground.

I could rant about the failures of modern UK policing for an epoch.


#25

I’ve always contended that violence is cultural. That’s not the only factor, but it sure seems to be the driving force. That’s why the UK did not experience a sudden drop in violence when the various landmark gun laws were passed. Nor did Australia. Big surprise, the peaceful people continued being peaceful.

That also explains why the UK is suddenly, very suddenly in fact, becoming a much more violent place. That is really unfortunate.

My state of Maine has virtually no gun laws. Fully-automatic weapons are legal here, as is concealed carry of loaded handguns with no permits for non-prohibited persons (felons, etc). I can take a stroll across town with an AR-15 strapped to my back and be completely legal as long as I don’t walk on Post Office or other Federal Government property. And you occasionally see people doing just that. Not often, but sometimes.

Oddly enough, there’s probably more knife carry laws here at this point. Restrictions on length, spring-loaded mechanisms, probably some other stuff I’m forgetting. I don’t think you can even completely conceal a knife over a certain length. But you can totally carry six handguns if you want. Anyway…

Our 1.2 million people are among the most peaceful population you will find anywhere.

Tying this back to Brazil, I don’t think it is a coincidence that one of the most effective fighting systems came out of that culture and was honed in massively popular Vale Tudo (no rules, no gloves) fighting matches. Sure, they stole most of it from Judo, but what emerged was distinctly Brazilian and pretty freaking savage.

Brazil has some bad motherfuckers running around for sure. I’m not sure there are any easy solutions to this problem now, just as I don’t think there are any easy solutions in the US’s enclaves of violence.

Eggs will be broken. Hopefully they manage to make an omelette.


#26

Man, we just do that to stay sharp.

Have you seen what we do to other countries when we get pissed? It is fucking over for them!

It’s like brothers fighting. It looks bad from the outside, but man, cut them loose in a bar fight and look out!


#27

It’s okay. Almost all of our violent crime is in like 10 zip codes if IIRC. It’s very very concentrated.

The majority of the US you can leave your car keys in your vehicle at night and your doors unlocked on your house and nothing happens. I still see people stop at a convenience store, leave the car running while they go buy stuff inside.


#28

#29

For those that haven’t seen it, check out the movie City of God (Cidade de Deus). Pretty stomach churning and much of it is on Youtube.

And it’s loosely based on a true story…


#30

I’m brazilian and pro-Bolsonaro. I have a few points to make regarding his views and how to media portraits him.
Jair Bolsonaro worked in the military and became a politician after that. He was a congressman for about 30 years. He is a conservative and right-wing in the political spectrum. He never once got involved in corruption scandals - actually, his name was mentioned a few times as the politician who would not get his hands dirty.

His bad reputation started when, years ago, he was giving an interview to the local media about a horrible crime that had occurred - a 16 y.o. drug dealer raped a girl for a week and murdered her afterwards, and, since he wasn’t 18 y.o. yet, he couldn’t go to jail. Bolsonaro was saying that the legal age for going to prison should be lowered, when a left-wing congresswoman came out of nowhere saying the criminal was just a kid, shouldn’t go to jail and Bolsonaro was the equivalent of a rapist for his ideas. The congressman lost his mind and told her “I’m a rapist? I wouldn’t rape you 'cause you don’t deserve it”. The media took this phrase out of context and started the campaign against him. Obviously it backfired and he only gained popularity.

He is not homophobic, mysoginist nor none of those things the media said exactly the same about Trump. He is a simple, humble man who did not got involved in corruption and is willing to fight against the criminal, corrupt establishment.

He said he is going to cut governamental funds to the mainstream media - another reason for they to hate him.

Brazil has 65 000 homicides every year - and climbing - as a result of the corrupt left-wing workers party that was in the government for the past 16 years. Bolsonaro was the only candidate who seriously talked about fighting back.

Paul Joseph Watson recorded an interview with Filipe G. Martins about Bolsonaro - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5IeZztlJwvw


#31

Thanks. It’s not often that we get to hear directly and unfiltered from someone.


#32

Isn’t this like someone in Brazil reading pro-Obama stuff from an Obama supporter online?

That is to say, it should probably be taken with a grain of salt?


#33

Maybe, but even then it would be valuable. I would rather hear about why people voted for Obama from someone who voted for Obama than from someone in Brazil debating over why someone would vote for Obama.


#34

I do take most things with a grain of salt.

For me hearing from someone who is there VS. a collected, chosen, edited news piece is like the difference between fruit fresh off of the tree and a bottle of ocean spray.

I’ll also take my chances with the possibility of finding the other half of a worm than the sure shot that the content of the bottle is only technically correct to the extent that it is required to be.


#35

I think I mentioned this - my cousin married a (smoke show) Brazilian - she’s very pro-Bolsonaro. My wife’s Brazilian doctor friend is also pro-Bolsonaro.

I also have a couple friends who are more communisitic in nature from Brazil who are very anti-Bolsonaro. It would seem ones bias very much influences whether they support or don’t - Most of the people I’ve encountered (very limited pool btw) who seem reasonable favor him, those who I find (politically) to be extreme do not.

Moral of the story … I know far more Brazilians than I thought I did prior to typing this up…


#36

Umm… you must have a different understanding of what that means given these quotes:

“I would be incapable of loving a homosexual son,” Bolsonaro said in an inteview. “I won’t be a hypocrite: I prefer a son to die in an accident than show up with a mustachioed guy. He’d be dead to me anyway.”

“If I see two men kissing in the street, I will beat them.” He then publicly defended beating gay children by saying: “If your child starts to become like that, a little gay, you take a whip and you change their behavior.”