T Nation

Precision Nutrition

I recently bought Berardi’s Precision Nutrition.

Before I purchased it, I read their description of the product, which states:

“Covers everything you need to know about nutrition. Precision Nutrition contains everything you need to get the body you want.”

and

“1 year membership to online library of articles, e-books and software. Access our complete Exercise Video Database and thousands of pages covering every conceivable fitness and nutrition topic in the Member Zone.”

When I purchased it, the first thing I was hit with was an additional $39.99 to get volume 2 of the cookbook. Fine, that was up front, and there was a discount, so I ordered that and paid extra for it.

Then, after joining, they hit me up for another $59.00 per year to use the “Results Tracker.” They claim that is not considered part of the “online library of articles, e-books and software” for which I bought a “1 year membership.” It raises an interesting question of what it is, or as Clinton would say, what “is” is.

The concept of it not being “software” is especially interesting considering their description of it on their website, which states:

“The Results Tracker is a web-based program that allows you to record, track and graph your results ? all built right in to your precisionnutrition.com account.”

Apparently they have created a “web-based program” that is not “software.” Yet, they even refer to it as software on their website. Also remember it is not an “article.”

They also state: “Introducing the Results Tracker: Online body composition recording, tracking and graphing, built into your Precision Nutrition account.”

Well, apparently it is not built into the account after all, but has to be added to the account. Also, they do not consider it to be included in their description of “everything you need to know about nutrition” or “everything you need to get the body you want.”

The concept of being charged additional money for software that by all descriptions should have been included in the 1 year account, is highly disturbing, dishonest and deceptive.

Go complain on the PN board, they might offer you a refund if you want to cancel the results tracker. I never understood why people pay for that thing anyway, an excel spreadsheet would work just as well IMO.

[quote]waldo21212 wrote:
Go complain on the PN board, they might offer you a refund if you want to cancel the results tracker. I never understood why people pay for that thing anyway, an excel spreadsheet would work just as well IMO.[/quote]

I appreciate the idea, however, I have requested that they honor their commitment to provide 1 year access to the software, without paying extra. They refused. Have you tried the results tracker? I don’t even know how it works because they do not allow access to it.

[quote]blw3 wrote:
waldo21212 wrote:
Go complain on the PN board, they might offer you a refund if you want to cancel the results tracker. I never understood why people pay for that thing anyway, an excel spreadsheet would work just as well IMO.

I appreciate the idea, however, I have requested that they honor their commitment to provide 1 year access to the software, without paying extra. They refused. Have you tried the results tracker? I don’t even know how it works because they do not allow access to it.[/quote]

Wouldn’t bother with it to be honest, pen and paper or excell will do just as good.

Like yourself i just got Part 2 of the cook book.

If you REALLY need it, then you could “find” it online in certain places

I purchased it about a year ago, and was not charged anything beyond the $99 fee.

[quote]jehovasfitness wrote:
I purchased it about a year ago, and was not charged anything beyond the $99 fee.[/quote]

x2,

PN is a good resource, there is a fairly large common sense component to it though, guess you could say that about anything thuogh

Eat lean meat, fruit, vegetables, and healthy fat 6 times a day in the portions necessary for your goals and include any starchy carbohydrates periworkout.

There for those who don’t have Precision Nutrition. The last sentence basically describes 60% of the content in the book. I personally like the book but I felt it wasn’t as filled with information as I was expecting. Lots of recipes, ideas, and such, but basically the whole program centers around I believe 7 guidelines that are mostly common sense but DO WORK.

[quote]stevo_ wrote:
PN is a good resource, there is a fairly large common sense component to it though, guess you could say that about anything thuogh[/quote]

Nothing common about common sense, right? I need more common sense when it comes to nutrition.

UPDATE: Thankfully, they agreed to add the results tracker to my account without the extra charge. Previously they declined the request, but they have now added it. :slight_smile:

Berardi is a good guy. I wouldn’t expect anything less. Good luck bro

Yeah it would seem to me that you got a freebie. The results tracker is an add on component that is not outlined in the original purchase price of PN, it’s not rocket science to understand this. You argued semantics however and got your way. Congrats I guess?

I can’t imagine why anyone who’s not completely new to this would buy it. Any info in the book can be found at multiple places on this site and many others

[quote]pumped340 wrote:
I can’t imagine why anyone who’s not completely new to this would buy it. Any info in the book can be found at multiple places on this site and many others[/quote]

I bought it largely based on the recommendation of Chris Shugart as a follow-up to the Velocity Diet. I’m sure the info is many places, but I’m looking for a system to put it all together. The info alone has not been enough. I needed a system, which the Velocity Diet has provided. Once that ends, I needed another plan.

[quote]pumped340 wrote:
I can’t imagine why anyone who’s not completely new to this would buy it. Any info in the book can be found at multiple places on this site and many others[/quote]

I bought it for the recipes

The info isn’t enough, you got to be kidding?

Tailor your OWN plan that meets YOUR needs and current goals, not expect someone to do all the work for you.

[quote]blw3 wrote:
The concept of being charged additional money for software that by all descriptions should have been included in the 1 year account, is highly disturbing, dishonest and deceptive.[/quote]

I bought prescision nutrition also and I think you’re not really being fair here at all.

First both things they “hit you up for” are totally optional and not some hidden charges for products that were essential to the program.

The original cookbook is pretty comprehensive. It’s like in college when you have a textbook the 2008 edition has pretty much everything the 2009 edition does except some minor changes, if some kids wanted to pay the $70 dollars extra for the newest version so be it, but no one complained about it.

Second the results tracker as stated on precision nutrition is best for advanced and detail oriented people and they are adding some stuff to tailor it to fitness professionals. For personal use it’s good but definitely not a fundamental aspect of precision nutrition.

The fact that they gave in to you, even though i don’t think you had a legitimate gripe shows how far off base you were calling them dishonest and deceptive.

[quote]OneMoreRep wrote:
The fact that they gave in to you, even though i don’t think you had a legitimate gripe shows how far off base you were calling them dishonest and deceptive. [/quote]

Reminds me of Alice …

"You should learn not to make personal remarks,' Alice said with some severity;it’s very rude.’

The Hatter opened his eyes very wide on hearing this; but all he SAID was, `Why is a raven like a writing-desk?’

Come, we shall have some fun now!' thought Alice.I’m glad they’ve begun asking riddles.–I believe I can guess that,’ she added aloud.

`Do you mean that you think you can find out the answer to it?’ said the March Hare.

`Exactly so,’ said Alice.

`Then you should say what you mean,’ the March Hare went on.

I do,' Alice hastily replied;at least–at least I mean what I say–that’s the same thing, you know.’

Not the same thing a bit!' said the Hatter.You might just as well say that “I see what I eat” is the same thing as “I eat what I see”!’

You might just as well say,' added the March Hare,that “I like what I get” is the same thing as “I get what I like”!’

You might just as well say,' added the Dormouse, who seemed to be talking in his sleep,that “I breathe when I sleep” is the same thing as “I sleep when I breathe”!’

`It IS the same thing with you,’ said the Hatter, and here the conversation dropped, and the party sat silent for a minute, while Alice thought over all she could remember about ravens and writing-desks, which wasn’t much."

[quote]Aggro wrote:
Yeah it would seem to me that you got a freebie. The results tracker is an add on component that is not outlined in the original purchase price of PN, it’s not rocket science to understand this. You argued semantics however and got your way. Congrats I guess?[/quote]

Semantics and truth in advertising are inextricably intertwined.


Semantics is the study of meaning. The word “semantics” itself denotes a range of ideas, from the popular to the highly technical. It is often used in ordinary language to denote a problem of understanding that comes down to word selection or connotation. This problem of understanding has been the subject of many formal inquiries, over a long period of time.

“False advertising or deceptive advertising is the use of false or misleading statements in advertising. As advertising has the potential to persuade people into commercial transactions that they might otherwise avoid, many governments around the world use regulations to control false, deceptive or misleading advertising. Truth in labeling refers to essentially the same concept, that customers have the right to know what they are buying, and that all necessary information should be on the label.” …

"Pricing-based methods

Hidden fees and surcharges

Service providers often tack-on fees and surcharges that are not disclosed to the customer in the advertised price. … In most cases, the fees are hidden in fine print, though in a few cases they are so confused and obfuscated by ambiguous terminology that they are essentially undisclosed. This may also occur with the bait-and-switch tactic. …

Meaningless terms

Manufacturers and sellers often use terms that sound advanced or deluxe to the average consumer, but really mean nothing at all. Most generically, this includes words like “deluxe”, “advanced”, “super”, “ultra”, “premium”, “heavy duty”, “hi-tech”, “space age”, and others. …

Undefined terms

Many terms do have some meaning, but the specific extent is not legally defined, leading to their abuse. A frequent example (until the term gained a legal definition) was “organic” food. “Light” food also is an even more common manipulation. The term has been variously used to mean low in calories, sugars, carbs, salt, texture, thickness (viscosity), or even light in color. Tobacco companies, for many years, used terms like “low tar”, “light”, “ultra-light”, “mild” or “natural”, but in recent years it was proved that those terms were considered misleading.

Another example is the United Egg Producers’ “Animal Care Certified” logo on egg cartons which misled consumers by conveying a higher level of animal care than was actually the case. Both the Better Business Bureau and the Federal Trade Commission found the logo to be deceptive and it can no longer be used."

Again, however, they took the high road, and I applaud them for that. They did the right thing.

LOL you got a lot of time on your hands.

Yeah he does. If you can take the effort you put forth in arguing and apply it to your weigh loss / muscle gains you’re gonna be a beast.

Good luck, obviously the results tracker will be the deciding factor.

Cut and paste doesn’t take much time. I’ve been doing it since Elementary School. :slight_smile: