T Nation

Power Clean and Split Jerk Form Check


#1

Hello CT!

It's been a while since I have been a regular on this site, but my relentless pursuit of muscle has not skipped a beat. This is going to be a medium/long post because of it!

Since April of this year, I have been studying and applying methods used by Dmitry Klokov.

Yesterday, I was able to Power Clean and Split Jerk 275, with relative ease. I hit the weight about 2 months ago, but not even close to this easy. In fact, I am considering my recent 275 the best C+J rep that I have ever performed - in terms of form and weight. It just felt so good.

Then I remembered an old friend who got me started on Cleans and Jerks and Snatches. A man who taught me priceless methods and literally taught me who Dmitry Klokov was. His name, Christian Thibaudeau!

Now I know that a 275 C+J is actually not that impressive. As a lot of us have learned by now, the numbers are mostly important as a form of data and organization. Since adopting Klokov's methods, and using what I was previously taught by Thibs, so far 2015 has been by far the most productive year of training I have had in my career.

I am 25 years old, and I have been a member of T-Nation since 2007. And if it were not for this MASSIVE wealth of information, and the people here who support it - I would not be where I am. It's that simple.

Now this next part is where Thibs comes in :slightly_smiling:

It's been a long while since I had a form/technique critique on my Weightlifts. And I firmly believe (simply because it has happened before) that CT will know how I can take this to the next level.

So without further adue, here is a 275 Power Clean and Split Jerk. I ask the simple question: How can I make this better?


#2

Sorry guys, working on getting this video right way up.


#3

Sorry about that guys. Should have just gone to YouTube to begin with. The previous post can be deleted if necessary.


#4
  1. Film from a 45 degrees forward angle next time.

  2. The jerk is decent. But in the dip the knees travel too far forward, arch the lower back harder and move the knees sideways a bit, because of the knees going forward you jerk a bit forward and lend with too much weight on your front food. From what I notice the reason your knees go forward is that you dip down about 2" too low, before that your position is perfect. You are right when you say that Klokov influenced you because he advocate a slow dip on the jerk whereas many experts recommend a faster dip. Personally I’m not against a slow dip BUT try to switch direction faster. Your back food is fast, it lends first which is perfect.

  3. In the clean your hips are too low in the starting position. Depending on your levers the back angle with vary, but the two universal principles that I use for the set-up are 1) shoulders above the bar (or even slightly in front) and 2) the knees should not pass the forearms. If from the side I can see your knees going past your forearms your hips are likely too low. What that does is put your weight too far forward and which is why you jump forward and your hips are too much under the shoulders when you catch the barbell.

Punch the hips back when you catch the barbell, otherwise you wont have much transfer from your power clean to a squat clean. Your pull is very strong, but you wont be efficient going under the bar if you jump forward (weight too much on the front of your feet) and do not get into a proper catch position. Even when you power clean, you should catch the barbell in a quarter or even a half squat to work on getting under the bar,

Look at Felix’ hips moving back as soon as he explode… yes it’s a squat clean drill, but when he catches it in a power position he does the exact same thing but slightly higher.


#5

Hi CT

The principle about hip height and not letting the knees pass the forearms apply to the snatch also?

Do you like your crossfit athletes to Olympic lift in their nanos or Olympic lifting shoes?


#6

[quote]Mccarthy09 wrote:
Hi CT

The principle about hip height and not letting the knees pass the forearms apply to the snatch also?

Do you like your crossfit athletes to Olympic lift in their nanos or Olympic lifting shoes? [/quote]

I’m a bit more permissive in the snatch, but I don’t want the knees to be too far in the start position.

I have some athletes who lift in Olympic lifting shoes, others in their nanos. The highest level ones lift in their nanos. They tend to be better overall athletes with better mobility.


#7

CT,

Awesome, thanks man! I had been noticing a few of these things (something had been off the last few weeks as I had gotten stronger but not acclimated technique wise) but of course was unsure on how exactly to fix it. I have applied these new principles to my training. I love pauses and working on that body contact for cleans and snatches. Today I will snatch and I do believe I need some work on getting my hips a bit further back on when I receive the bar here also.

The further along I have gotten into my training career the more I find it resembles that of a vintage athletic club. Weightlifting, Wrestling/Boxing, Gymnastics, Cycling sometimes, and the occasional strongman/circus lift. Truth be told I have never enjoyed training as much as I do now, and subsequently am making the best progress yet. I’m almost 26 y/o, do you have any tips for sustainable training and longevity at this point?

Thanks again, glad to see that T-Nation is still the best!


#8

Remember that the hip contact comes from a simultaneous action of the hips going forward and the lats sweeping the bar toward you explosively. You seem to exclusively use the hips and as a result your make contact when the hips are too far forward. So the bar moves forward… this robs you of a lot of upward momentum.

Look at that drill to see what I’m talking about. The bar contacts the hips when the hips aren’t far forward, and he immediately punch the hips back to the catch position.


#9

[quote]howie424 wrote:
The further along I have gotten into my training career the more I find it resembles that of a vintage athletic club. Weightlifting, Wrestling/Boxing, Gymnastics, Cycling sometimes, and the occasional strongman/circus lift. Truth be told I have never enjoyed training as much as I do now, and subsequently am making the best progress yet. I’m almost 26 y/o, do you have any tips for sustainable training and longevity at this point?

Thanks again, glad to see that T-Nation is still the best![/quote]

Keep using a lot of different movements that are athletic, sprints are good to. Moving fast is the best way to stay young and functional.

Think heavy on the strength lift and quality/speed/precision on the Olympic lifts.


#10

CT,

Thank you once again for your awesome advice. I have been applying these solutions the past 3-4 days with much lighter percentages ( I do empty bar work for 10 min. prior to ea session, so it’s not hard to find the time). I prefer to spend most of my time around 70%, and with the right consistency this has led to great strength and physique changes for me, and when I do my heavy work it seems to have a much better payoff.

I will continue to apply these new techniques, you’ve helped me greatly and because of it I have a lot of work to do and I am very much looking forward to.

Today is snatch day. Post-snatch focus is deficit SG DL, High Pulls, and some upper body pulling/pressing (I love snatch presses a la Klokov).

Will follow up with some HIIT cycling/heavy bag/speed bag/chin-ups. Some basic athletic stuff I like to do a couple times a week. I will also do some wrestling.