T Nation

Pound for Pound Strength, "Impressive for Bodyweight"?


#1

Would a 100lb person deadlifting 200lbs for a 1RM be the same as, say, a 300lb man deadlifting 600lb for a 1RM? This is just a double-bodyweight deadlift, but is there a lower or upper limit on body weight when lifts aren’t really considered “impressive for bodyweight” ?

Or is a triple bodyweight deadlift at 100lbs bodyweight just as impressive as a triple bodyweight deadlift at 300lbs? I figure it would cap out at some point.

For example, You probably wont see a 400 lb Man (Halfthor Bjornsson) deadlifting triple bodyweight in his lifetime, so pound for pound’s sake, is he not as impressive as smaller triple bodyweight lifters?


#2

All of the feats you describe are more impressive than your trolling skills.


#3

This is why we have wilks.


#4

What is trolling about this question?


#5

Deadlifting 800lbs at any bodyweight is an incredible feat. Even if you’re 500lbs, pulling 800 is more impressive than a 200lb person deadlifting 600. Being 400lbs helps, but the biggest increase one would expect to see from weight gain would likely be exceeding 300lbs BW. 180-220lb guys seem to share very similar strength levels. So do 300-400lb guys. This leaves the most noticeable strength gaps to be from 140lbs-180lbs, to 220lbs-300lbs.

Essentially, the idea that more mass will enable you to move more mass stands true to a point but clearly a very fixed point. Our body doesn’t care if we think 10lbs of fat makes us deadlift 10 more pounds.


#6

Thank you. That’s what I was wondering. I’ve heard some people say triple BW is better no matter what but that didn’t sound right to me.


#7

Lots (comparatively) of 100-150 lb people have pulled 3.5-4.5 x bodyweight.

Ed Coan is the only guy who comes to mind pulling over 4x bodyweight at 220.

I find the thing that occurs less frequently to be more impressive and be more indicative of being worthy of praise.


#8

Eric Lillibridge pulls about 3x bodyweight.

I pull more than 3x bodyweight.

I am a better powerlifting than Eric Lillibridge.

/pleasepickuponthesarcasm

I’ve found that the people who feel passionate about pound for pound rankings are small and weak.


#9

I dismiss people like this.

It’s ridiculous to assume that BW and strength are linear.

In other words every 1lb of BW does not correlate to 2lbs of strength.


#10

Are you fucking retarded!!!

:wink:


#11

I mean, my sister did drop me down the stairs on my first thanksgiving…


#13

Interesting bit of information… Ed Coan NEVER worried about weight to strength ratio all he cared about was out lifting guys regardless if they were heavier than him.


#14

THIS hits it on the head


#15

I find the wilks favors heavy lifters in a big way. Comparing erics sleeves total 2369@308 600.68 points to a middle weight 181 would have to hit 1970 and still be slightly less at 600.39 points. derstine who I consider one of the best lifters needs another 70 lbs on his sleeve total to hit that and I think hes like 5’6" ish


#16

It’s not perfect, but it’s something. NASA uses their own too.


#17

There’s a lot more people that will compete at 180-220 than over 300.

That might be why wilks favors heavier people, simply because there’s not as much competition.

I’m not entirely sure, just some food for thought.


#18

Yea I believe it was based off past performance. And the fact the most 300+lb people are just overweight and not strong. Thats another reason I’m bumping up to 198s itll be way easier to beak into the deep 500 points


#19

Bigger people have physics working against them.

  1. They are thicker, which places the bar further in front of the center of gravity. This then requires more force to move the bar. For example John Kuc’s best DL as a super (330) was 848. When he reduced to 242 he achieved an 870 DL.

  2. They are usually taller in which case the bar moves a greater distance. This would require a much greater force to break the bar off the floor in order to have enough momentum to cover the greater distance.

Because of physics an 800 lb DL by a 6’4" 330 lber is much harder than an 800 lb DL by someone Ed Coan’s size 5’6" and 220. The larger individual may actually be lifting the equivalent of 900 or so lbs.


#20

So me and @Reed squat the same because I’m taller. It all makes sense now.
Thanks! I knew he was cheating somehow


#21

Richard Hawthorne pulled 630(ish) at 130(ish) BW. Roughly 4.9XBW.