T Nation

Potential New IPF Rules


#81

If that’s the case then you don’t even need to go to a meet, just lift in the gym for Instagram likes.

Well, I can see a good reason for regulating which brands are allowed - otherwise something like those denim sleeves could pass gear check and records can be set that otherwise wouldn’t have happened. The problem with the IPF is that their fees are ridiculously high, USPA/IPL charges approval fees too but if you check the rates (I can’t remember off the top of my head) it’s much lower. That is one of the reasons why there is such a limited selection of brands on the IPF list. These fees also cause the prices of equipment to increase for everyone.


#82

Yup, which is what a lot of powerlifting is becoming.


#83

Is it powerlifting if you don’t compete in a meet?


#84

Just to give you another fed for comparison, look at WPC. They have a raw w/ wraps division, all wraps up to 3m are allowed. The raw (without wraps) division doesn’t allow any sleeves at all. However, CPF, the Canadian affiliate, allows knee sleeves in the raw division but 1) you can’t qualify for international meets if you wear sleeves, and 2) you can’t set a world record if you choose to wear sleeves (world records can be set at Nationals.) The reason for allowing sleeves seems to be to attract lifters from other feds, otherwise people who are used to squatting in sleeves would think twice about lifting in a CPF meet. As far as sleeves, there is no approved list and I don’t believe that there is a limit for thickness either. The fed’s president wears 9mm Cerberus sleeves when he lifts in CPF meets.


#85

If raw lifting is shoes, knee sleeves and belt, what would they call a fed where you have to lift barefoot and beltless with nothing around your knees dressed in either a toga or a loincloth?

I’ll tell you what that is. That’s REAL powerlifting. Strength only. No silly supportive gear that makes you seem stronger than you really are.

Once I get the RPF (Real Powerlifting Federation) up and running I’m only going to charge $100,000 to get your loincloths and togas RPF-approved.

See you next year, losers!


#86

I don’t think so, but the internet is rife with “powerlifters” who don’t compete, haha. It’s a sad state.


#87

Is it basketball if you play at the park with your friends? I guess so, but not at a competitive level.


#88

Need more info to make a call. Are you complaining about the bar, the way the weights are loaded and the humidity?


#89

That depends on how strict your definitions are, or whether you even give a shit about those sort of distinctions.

A proper basketball game will have referees enforcing the rule set, timed periods, set team sizes and all of the other factors that make a basketball game a basketball game. Rules will vary by levels of play and leagues, but it will be recognizable as the sport of basketball.

Playing a pickup game won’t have those things, and may also involve rough-housing, travelling, fighting, illegal defense, pot-smoking, illegal screens, alcohol consumption and regular cigarette breaks.

If all I ever did was get high and take suckas to school at the playground, does that make me a basketball player? Perhaps, but it would be disingenuous to give people the idea that you competed at a high level even if you ran the playground back in your glory days when you could dunk and run clinics on all the fools who thought they could hang with the king.


#90

This is excactly my though. If one does not compete in a judged meet, but trains strength in the powerlifts, its hard to descripe him/her as a “powerlifter”.


#91

I agree completely, which is why I now preface almost any post I share in this forum with “I’m not a powerlifter”.


#92

This seems another weird quirk of powerlifters. There’s nobody playing club or probably even state level basketball who says theyre a basketballer but rock up to a powerlifting meet with 4 weeks of training 18 months ago and you’re a powerlifter.


#93

I think context is important. My stepson can absolutely call himself a hockey player. He’s 17 and plays organized hockey almost year-round. It’s a huge part of who he is and a huge part of how he spends his time.

Now, if he’s still going around saying he’s a hockey player when he’s 30 and no longer competing (assuming he doesn’t make the NHL, of course), well then he might be having a crisis of identity and need to have a little chat.

For an extreme example, look up a guy named Charlie Zelenoff on youtube. He calls himself a “boxer”. Now he definitely punches people in the face, that’s not in dispute at all. But he is definitely giving people the wrong idea about exactly what it is that he does.


#94

That is true, just like playing basketball at the park does not make you a basketball player. You could say you are a “non-competitive powerlifter”, but then you’re just a guy who lifts weights in a gym. So maybe in that case there is no powerlifting going on unless you are at the very least training with the intention of competing in a sanctioned meet.


#96

I’d say this is accurate, no? What else would be needed to qualify as a powerlifter (unless we’re talking about RPF, of course)?


#97

Like I said, I don’t know anyone who calls themselves a basketballer because they played in a low level game a few times or even regularly.

The strength sports have this weird identity thing going on. I’ve met so many bodybuilders and powerlifters, same thing happens with strongmen, Olympic weightlifters.

I wonder if we’re as annoying as vegans are to other communities lol


#98

I ate some vegetables today, do I qualify?


#99

Gosh. All this crap really makes me rethink my decisions to compete.


#100

Just compete in any other fed. USPA, RPS, WPC (APF in the US), anything but IPF or USAPL. Other feds have next to no drama, 99% of the bad stuff you hear is the IPF and its affiliates.


#101

I’ve had a few folks reference the APF to me. That has caught my attention. That or USPA. Have no idea which of those two is better.