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Post Workout Meal & Glucose Tolerance

Hello,

I have read research that says “it’s been demonstrated that when glycemic control was improved in men, Testosterone and its metabolites increased to a significant degree”

& that a subsequent meal following a high GI feeding resuls in poorer glucose tolerance that a meal following a low GI meal.

Should High GI carbs still be consumed post-workout or avoided all together?

Following a workout most of the glucose uptake is non-insulin mediated, so the normal rules go out the window. Training will likely induce an acute state of insulin resistance, followed by a rebound and subsequent improvement. This also changes the rules. Finally, the post workout meal will temporarily decrease test levels, which has been postulated to be due to increased uptake, although the jury is still out.

The bottom line is that when resistance training is thrown in, the rules change dramatically.
Stick with high GI carbs until we find out otherwise.

If postworkout carbs are non insulin mediated then why do I get a “blood sugar crash” after my postworkout meal?

isn’t it better to combine different carbohydrates of varying GI/ID ? ie, one fast, medium and slow?

like grapes (fast), unripe bananas greenish and whole wheat bread [slow]?

couple that with a protein shake and you should ok, right?

Most likely because you are not getting a very good workout. Post your workout.

Does it depend on how much your glycogen levels are depleted?

[quote]
Should High GI carbs still be consumed post-workout or avoided all together?

Does it depend on how much your glycogen levels are depleted?

If postworkout carbs are non insulin mediated then why do I get a “blood sugar crash” after my postworkout meal?

Most likely because you are not getting a very good workout. Post your workout.
[/quote]

Yes your body’s insulin response to a given glycemic load will depend on your body’s glycogen depletion. The body tends to replace glycogen stores first, once those are replenished, insulin is released to store any surpluses. So the question really should be how much?

If you are getting post-meal hypoglycemia then you are consuming a glycemic load that is above your glycogen depletion. To prevent this you can reduce the GI, reduce the quantity of carbs, and/or consume your carbs gradually during your workout (if possible).

As suggested you could also increase your glycogen depletion by increasing training workload but usually we set up trainig first and then match the nutrition.

so the insulin response of any meal is dependent upon glycogen levels?

I thought low carb diets(low glycogen levels) reduced glucose tolerance and exacerbated insulin release.

Here’s an example of what someone earlier was saying:
Some time ago I was using Surge pwo and regularly had a hypoglycemic response. After toying with various alternatives, I found that oatmeal coupled with low carb Grow worked quite well without any hypoglycemic activity.
The key here for me was finding a carbohydrate that had a lower GI response and oatmeal did the trick.

I have always thought that high GI carbs post workout were overrated and was just a marketing excuse to load up expensive supplements with dextrose/ maltodextrin and increase their profit margins.

Agreed?

[quote]T-man wrote:
Most likely because you are not getting a very good workout. Post your workout.[/quote]

Give me a break! I have done workouts that strip my body of every last drop of glycogen, and I still get the post-post-workout meal slump if I eat anything more than a tiny snack.

Workout examples: 10,000 meter row in sub-38:30. 2 sets of 30 reps of 115-pound barbell clean and jerk in seven and eight minutes, respectively, with rest in between. 5 rounds of 21 reps of hang squat clean, run 400 meters in 17-something. 10 sets of 10 pull-ups and ring dips - ~60 minutes of exercise.

After these meals, I consumed a post-workout meal of ~800-1000 calories: ~400 cals protein, the rest high-GI CHO. ~30 mintues post-meal, I invariably experienced a huge bonk. I eat 3-4k a day.

Point: Even maximal glycogen depletion does not seem to me empty out glycogen reserves enough to eat more than a very small post-workout meal. And eating a very small post-workout meal kills recovery.

[quote]fedorov91 wrote:
so the insulin response of any meal is dependent upon glycogen levels?

I thought low carb diets(low glycogen levels) reduced glucose tolerance and exacerbated insulin release.[/quote]

Yes it all depends on your body’s energy balance at that time. Insulin seems to be largely a fat storage hormone. So if your muscles, liver, and blood are partially glucose depleted any calories consumed will first go towards replenishing those through non-insulin means.

One cannot simply look at low carb vs high carb etc. You also have to factor in total calories and overall energy balance. If you are on a cutting diet (hypocaloric) then any given meal will have less of an insulin response vs when bulking (hypercaloric).

Also do keep in mind that although fats and proteins basically zero on the GI, they will still produce an insulin response if they lead to surplus calories.

[quote]fedorov91 wrote:
I have always thought that high GI carbs post workout were overrated and was just a marketing excuse to load up expensive supplements with dextrose/ maltodextrin and increase their profit margins.

Agreed?[/quote]

We could make the argument that all supplements are overrated. Most people agree that real food is best and if one stay’s on top of their nutrition then that is all they could need. However there is something to be said for the convenience of supplements.

If you like the taste of your brand name high GI pwo drink and you have obtained favorable results then great.