T Nation

Plyos/Jumps/Bounds etc

Hi CT

Ever since you wrote about doing daily jumps I have been doing them throughout my workouts. Its usually just 14 vertical jumps (sometimes I do weighted or depth jumps if I feel very ‘springy’ that day) And I defiantly feel the positive effects.

Im curious as to how you would set a progression model for jumps? How over time would be a good way to increase the intensity and general volume of jumps? I’m speaking not only for body comp changes but more so for increasing max power for sports.

Thanks CT.

What article are you talking about? I’d like to read it…

Smallmike,

It wasn’t an article, CT talked about it in the spills. It was simply performing a max of 14 single rep jumps in a workout ( in between sets) there were different levels of jumps, easiest (well more neurally demanding) being simple vertical jumps, then jumping over a hurdle or onto box, then weighted, then depth jumps etc… CT can probably explain better.

Well jumps can be used several ways… between-set jumps like you are doing are mostly to amp you up/activate the nervous system to make the rest of the workout more effective. You will of course get some improvement in power production but not as much as if you focused mostly on jumps during a workout.

Someone who wanted to maximize jumping power would devote at least half a workout to jumping, and these would not be done between-sets. For example you could do the jumping workout, rest 10-15 minutes and do your strength workout (or vice-versa depending on your priority).

2 such sessions a week should be done and intensity should be ramped up during the training block… for example:

Week 1: Regular jumps (vertical jumps, broad jumps, jump lunges for example)
Week 2: Targeted jumps (box jumps, jumps over hurdles for example)
Week 3: Loaded jumps (jump squats, loaded jump lunges for example)
Week 4: Depth jumps from a 20 to 30" block (for height or distance)
Week 5: no jumping
Start over

The TOTAL ground contacts (reps) per workout should be between:
Regular jumps: 40-50/workout or 80-100 per week
Targeted jumps:30-40/workout or 60-80 per week
Loaded jumps: 20-30/workout so 40-60 per week
Depth jumps: 20-30/workout so 40-60 per week

Thanks CT!!

As far as reps per set are concerned does it matter that much? (obviously not doing 20 reps sets or anything silly like that) so doing sets of 1-5 doesn’t matter as long as you reach the target daily volume. or should you try to ramp up (box height, depth jump height, weight) if you can?

[quote]GmG-II wrote:
Thanks CT!!

As far as reps per set are concerned does it matter that much? (obviously not doing 20 reps sets or anything silly like that) so doing sets of 1-5 doesn’t matter as long as you reach the target daily volume. or should you try to ramp up (box height, depth jump height, weight) if you can?

[/quote]

As long as there is no loss of explosiveness during a set, it doesn’t really matter.

CT, would you be able to review the form for a regular jump? I can’t recall where you directly talked about it. I rememeber the basics, but want to pass them onto my lifting partner.

[quote]tywall wrote:
CT, would you be able to review the form for a regular jump? I can’t recall where you directly talked about it. I rememeber the basics, but want to pass them onto my lifting partner.[/quote]

  1. The dip down must be rapid … slow dip do not build up as much elastic energy that can be used during the actual jump

  2. The dip must be short… people wrongfully assume that squatting down lower will allow you to jump higher. This is not true, going down lower will have you reach max acceleration before the launching point which means that when you launch you are not accelerating and thus creating much less momentum

  3. During the dip you should bend the knees while shifting your weight to the heels by bringing the hips far back. The torso should be bent forward, but too much: the chest should still be pointed forward.

  4. When you initiate the jump you aggressively shift the weight toward the toes while you are extending the knees and torso.

  5. The arms contribute for up to 10% of the jumping height. Their action must be properly timed. When you go down, bring your elbows back, arms bent at about 90 degrees. When you initiate the jump you throw your arms up, extending them fully. They must reach the fully extended position at the same time as your toes are leaving the floor.

[quote]tywall wrote:
CT, would you be able to review the form for a regular jump? I can’t recall where you directly talked about it. I rememeber the basics, but want to pass them onto my lifting partner.[/quote]

not only will you learn the technique cues, you’ll pick up some lessons on coaching:

http://www.T-Nation.com/free_online_article/sports_body_training_performance_neural_charge/neural_charge_training

Hey CT, could you apply this jumping program to the layer system? Like do the jump workouts on explosive pull days?

[quote]shanetrain49 wrote:
Hey CT, could you apply this jumping program to the layer system? Like do the jump workouts on explosive pull days?[/quote]

Sure, but I’d do a little less volume on the jumps… maybe 10 less ground contacts per workout or at least stay at the lower end of the range.