T Nation

Plyometrics

sup guys im goin to georgia in a few weeks for nationals, for volleyball and im lookin for a good plyometric workout to get my hops up. i train chest mon , tues off maybe abs, wed deadlift maybe abs, thurs off, and friday squat but for now i wanna make it my plyometric day… any great routines/ workouts?

Gotta ask a couple questions first:

Are you inseason or offseason right now?

What are your current max lift numbers, or and approximation?

Is your height, weight, and BF in your profile legit?

[quote]Doug Adams wrote:
Gotta ask a couple questions first:

Are you inseason or offseason right now?

What are your current max lift numbers, or and approximation?

Is your height, weight, and BF in your profile legit?[/quote]

i already play once or twice a week so pretty much yes

deadlift-315x2, squat 275 x 2, bench 195 x 2

im 6’4, 189 lbs. and my bodyfat is approx. 6-7%… btw i already have a 20 + inch vert

Get your squat up. It’ll help you more. You’re already doing a lot of plyos just by playing volleyball.

[quote]rmccart1 wrote:
Get your squat up. It’ll help you more. You’re already doing a lot of plyos just by playing volleyball.[/quote]

so what your saying is if i just keep on playing volleyball and raising my squat poundage im going to get better hops? possibly but not to a sport specific extent. if that were the case anyone who played basketball or volleyball all day would all have 30 inch verts

[quote]diamonddelts59 wrote:
rmccart1 wrote:
Get your squat up. It’ll help you more. You’re already doing a lot of plyos just by playing volleyball.

so what your saying is if i just keep on playing volleyball and raising my squat poundage im going to get better hops? possibly but not to a sport specific extent. if that were the case anyone who played basketball or volleyball all day would all have 30 inch verts[/quote]

Only if they squatted a large amount of weight. Think 2-2.5x bodyweight at least.

Ya, drop the deadlifts, and do more squats.

Depth jumps/ drop jumps/one legged hops. Plyometric is such a poorly understood word these days. I would argue that simply playing voleyball is not plyometric in any way.

If jumping more were going to help him, he’d be getting better just playing volleyball. That doesn’t appear to be the case. Not that he shouldn’t do plyometrics, but I’d be willing to bet he’s just weak.

By the way, what does “sport specific” have to do with this? Your quads, glutes, and hams work in your sport, and squats work those muscles. I’d argue that squats are sport specific.

do hill accelerations and interval sprints too. Jumps with barbells. Plyo pushups, knee jumps, there’s tons of good stuff. I’m about to start up a program with a lot of plyometric movements myself

[quote]rmccart1 wrote:
If jumping more were going to help him, he’d be getting better just playing volleyball. That doesn’t appear to be the case. Not that he shouldn’t do plyometrics, but I’d be willing to bet he’s just weak.

By the way, what does “sport specific” have to do with this? Your quads, glutes, and hams work in your sport, and squats work those muscles. I’d argue that squats are sport specific.[/quote]

There is a significant difference between plyometrics and just jumping. Jumping in volleyball, basketball etc is significantly different than plyometrics. Standard jumping does not, according to research, produce a higher vertical. You are correct to say he needs to get stronger, but actual TRUE plyometrics (not just jumping in volleyball) would be extraordinarily effective.

Also, and this is just being argumentative at this point, sport specific is very important. The transfer of training from squatting to jump height is significant, but as the squat gets higher this transfer diminishes. At some point the work put into the squat is excessive for the small transfer of training. A more specific and direct attack on the desired goal is necessary as an athlete becomes more elite. This is one of the primary reasons NFL athletes do not train heavy weights, the work required for squats and such is way to much for its insignificant help. One could argue this guy is not at that level though.

I play volleyball in college. Here is a general template we might use:

Monday
A. Jumps
B. Posterior chain
C. Horizontal press
D. Row

Wednesday
A. Speed & quickness
B. Unilateral lower
C. Vertical press
D. Chins

Friday
A. Core lift (squat or deadlift)
B. Posterior chain
C. Biceps/triceps
D. Upper back/shoulders

On jumps this may vary from box jumps and broad jumps to weighted box jumps and jump squats to bounding to traditional plyos like depth drops and jumps. Speed and quickness also would depend but general it’s some quickness “footwork” type stuff, some change of direction stuff and some short sprints.

Take it for what it’s worth. I’ve improved my vertical leap from 29.5" to 36" over the three years I’ve been in school and a big part of that has came in getting stronger. You get a ton of jumping in practice, almost every volleyball player who has been playing for a while is a proficient jumper, it is just a matter of putting more force behind the movement. When I entered college I was about 165lb at 6’3" and now I’m about 210 or so. I’ve gained weight but I’ve gone from not being able to squat 135 with good form to being able to hit 405 on the squat and 500 on the dead. Getting stronger is extremely important.

[quote]Gianacakos wrote:
rmccart1 wrote:
If jumping more were going to help him, he’d be getting better just playing volleyball. That doesn’t appear to be the case. Not that he shouldn’t do plyometrics, but I’d be willing to bet he’s just weak.

By the way, what does “sport specific” have to do with this? Your quads, glutes, and hams work in your sport, and squats work those muscles. I’d argue that squats are sport specific.

There is a significant difference between plyometrics and just jumping. Jumping in volleyball, basketball etc is significantly different than plyometrics. Standard jumping does not, according to research, produce a higher vertical. You are correct to say he needs to get stronger, but actual TRUE plyometrics (not just jumping in volleyball) would be extraordinarily effective. Also, and this is just being argumentative at this point, sport specific is very important. The transfer of training from squatting to jump height is significant, but as the squat gets higher this transfer diminishes. At some point the work put into the squat is excessive for the small transfer of training. A more specific and direct attack on the desired goal is necessary as an athlete becomes more elite. This is one of the primary reasons NFL athletes do not train heavy weights, the work required for squats and such is way to much for its insignificant help. One could argue this guy is not at that level though.[/quote]

With all due respect, I think you’re missing the forest for the trees. Forget about the differences between jumping and plyometrics. The point is, increasing movement efficiency is probably not going to be the most expedient way for him to progress, as he already gets a lot of practice jumping. Looking at his numbers, his squat is not so impressive that increasing it would be unlikely to improve his jump, but it is low enough to suggest that he probably needs to improve absolute force, and not its rate of application (plyometrics).

I know it was at the very end, but I do see where you are coming from. One could, and should for that matter, argue that he is nowhere near the level where the transfer of training from squats would be insignificant. It is just one of my personal pet peeves to hear people throw around the word plyometrics, especially referring to simple jumping.

I think you know the difference, but many people on this site don’t and they should educate themselves properly. In the end, we agree. UPDATE. I have since realized I was not educated myself, sorry about all the bullshit I wrote before this.

[quote]Gianacakos wrote:
Standard jumping does not, according to research, produce a higher vertical.[/quote]

I would LOVE to see some research that supports this.

Id argue that in volleyball you are already making a ton of landings which take their toll on the joints. Try going with something like box jumps where the impace is minimal and but smaller boxes next to the large one to step down onto.

Personally 4 weeks of a plyo program always makes my knees slightly ache. Not so much where I’m affected much but its enough to make me aware that it might be time to let up a bit.

Box jumps do not do this to me at all though.

Also save the high impact ones for your program leading to the season, not for in season.

My personal opinion based on my experiences. So take it for what it’s worth.

[quote]jtrinsey wrote:
Gianacakos wrote:
Standard jumping does not, according to research, produce a higher vertical.

I would LOVE to see some research that supports this.[/quote]

i agree, im currently in training with an ex-A mens player and he told me that in his training program he would just go out into the middle of a field and jump forever (along with a few other things obviously), and im not going to argue with a 6’4 man that used to have a 36 inch vert

I played basketball in college and what really helped me were hill sprints. I did them 3x a week up a 30yrd hill. I would do anywhere between 10 to 30 each time depending on what my practice/game schudule looked like.

[quote]DB297 wrote:
I played basketball in college and what really helped me were hill sprints. I did them 3x a week up a 30yrd hill. I would do anywhere between 10 to 30 each time depending on what my practice/game schudule looked like. [/quote]

Man your bringing back memories. Hill sprints helped me more as an athelete then any thing else. I’d recomend them for any athelete who really wants to improve his/her game.