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Plyometric Leg Workouts

What are good workout routines, and or websites that detail plyometric leg workouts. i do snatches on deadlift day, but I am unsure what to do on squat days.

thanks

http://www.brianmac.demon.co.uk/legplymo.htm

I own this book. Can’t speak highly enough of it.

Most reviews I’ve read called Chu’s books a waste of money, about 5 pages of useful info and 100 pages of stick figure diagrams. If you just want exercises, don’t bother wasting your money on a book, there are descriptions and videos online.

What is your reason for doing plyometrics? Is it for vertical, speed, or another ability involved in sports performance? Kelly Baggett has 2 great manuals, one on speed and one on vertical jumping, both are great. It isn’t really wise to implement plyometric exercises randomly, just to say you do them, and hope they improve your performance.

good questions

I want to build a strong lower body with some size. my legs are generally big enough, and whenever i do build them up with squats, i feel unathletic and immobile.

i am looking for variety bc i am unsatisfied with my squat numbers right now. i read an article on how adam archuleta was trained with some plyometrics and his squat went way up. also interesting to note was that they timed his squat, and it dropped from 3 seconds to 1 second(more power)

thanks

[quote]smallmike wrote:
Most reviews I’ve read called Chu’s books a waste of money, about 5 pages of useful info and 100 pages of stick figure diagrams. If you just want exercises, don’t bother wasting your money on a book, there are descriptions and videos online.[/quote]

Agreed. Own it, don’t think much of it.

[quote]jtrinsey wrote:
smallmike wrote:
Most reviews I’ve read called Chu’s books a waste of money, about 5 pages of useful info and 100 pages of stick figure diagrams. If you just want exercises, don’t bother wasting your money on a book, there are descriptions and videos online.

Agreed. Own it, don’t think much of it.[/quote]

Dont understand what you mean.

It has a basic breakdown of the basic plyometric exercises. Perfect for a beginner. Just a basic, beginner book.

You can buy it on amazon for like 12 bucks.

[quote]V R wrote:
It has a basic breakdown of the basic plyometric exercises. Perfect for a beginner. Just a basic, beginner book.

You can buy it on amazon for like 12 bucks. [/quote]

My beef is that it really doesn’t tell you anything. It shows you a bunch of stuff you can do, that any 4th grader has already figured out on the playgrounds. Yes, hop over a cone this way instead of that way, exactly what I needed.

It doesn’t tell you anything about how to integrate plyometrics into a training plan, how to progress, how to assess athletes, the effects different drills might have, etc. etc.

CT had a great section in his article today about plyos.

[quote]jtrinsey wrote:
It shows you a bunch of stuff you can do, that any 4th grader has already figured out on the playgrounds.

[/quote]

Yea, it might not show you anything new to someone like you and me who are well versed in plyo training. But remember beginners are beginners. Most trainees don’t even know what the word plyometric is.

Second off, I feel that alot of the advanced, fancy plyo movements are unnecessary. Just like the basic compound movements are essential and the best way to lift weights and get stronger, I feel like the basic, simple plyo movements are also the best ones available. Simple cone/box hops, depth jumps, various single and double legs jumps and bounding is the best way, along with squatting, to increase vert speed and jump ability.

The basics are the best. Seems to apply to everything in the exercise world.