Plyometric Bench Press Training

I would like to discuss the implications for this article for speed training for bench press. If we do not we have a partner for training the plyometric bench press, what are the alternatives to what is being suggested in this article

I am aware of some people advocate using push ups. But with push ups, you are limited with the weight you can use

teotjunk

I don’t see anything wrong with pushups. Sure the weight limits you, but you can progress by bouncing higher.

I only scanned the article…

Is it saying that plyo bench work will have a good carryover to max strength pressing?

And that it should be more or less effective than dynamic work?

I think there’s a lot of merit to upper-body plyos. Maybe they work better than dynamic effort benching, maybe not. Maybe it’s just another tool and everything should be cycled. I certainly think it’s a different stimulus than speed bench.

Of course I don’t know anything, really. There are a lot of good exercises to be done, though. The medicine ball drops it mentions, bench throws, depth pushups, drop-and-catch bench press, etc.

[quote]Hanley wrote:
I only scanned the article…

Is it saying that plyo bench work will have a good carryover to max strength pressing?

And that it should be more or less effective than dynamic work?[/quote]

yes. It is saying plyo bench work will be more effective than dynamic bench work and and I am trying to find out if it is really true.

teotjunk

[quote]rmccart1 wrote:
I think there’s a lot of merit to upper-body plyos. Maybe they work better than dynamic effort benching, maybe not. Maybe it’s just another tool and everything should be cycled. I certainly think it’s a different stimulus than speed bench.

Of course I don’t know anything, really. There are a lot of good exercises to be done, though. The medicine ball drops it mentions, bench throws, depth pushups, drop-and-catch bench press, etc.[/quote]

Yes. However things like medicine ball drop and drop and catch bench press requires a partner. I thought of using a Smith Machine but I have heard that the use of Smith Machine is not really good.

teotjunk

If anyone remembers that shitstorm of a thread where I disagreed with CW (when I posted as RJ24), I actually wrote on this topic.

The basis of this article is that strength training is not just about how much is on the bar, but what the actual tension on the working musculature is. It is possible to generate higher intramuscular tension by bench pressing 225 lbs very quickly (using a drop and catch method) than by benching 365 in a controlled manner. Just because the weight is lower, does not mean the effect on the body is diminished.

I would go as far as to say that one could get very strong without ever having to lift more than 50-75% of their 1RM, and for no more than 5 reps. Medicine balls are too light to be of use in developing MaxS, but a barbell can be very easily be using in its place.

In reality though, methods like these are not really meant to replace heavy lifting, especially for strength athletes like PLs. Traditional lifting would serve most athletes better than these methods most of the time, but plyometric bench presses can be cycled into one’s training to break plateaus once every so often.

Common sense dictates this is a useful form of training, and another useful tool in the toolbox for most athletes. I do wonder about powerlifters though.

[quote]undeadlift wrote:
I don’t see anything wrong with pushups. Sure the weight limits you, but you can progress by bouncing higher.[/quote]

I get what you mean that you can compensate with the lighter load with higher speed. but somehow I still think the weights limits you. For example. I am still 60kg . Doing pushup would involve about 60% of my weight which means I am bench pressing 36kg. Suppose my one rep max for bench press is 100 kg. That’s not even 40% of one rep max. Actually as I am typing this I realized what can be done to remedy the situation. Just carry a backbag and add some weight to it.

teotjunk

Do the press ups one armed.