T Nation

Plyo?

I hear that plyometrics can be a good thing to include in a training program and that women seem to find it especially helpful for leaning out. I don’t really know much about it, though. Can anyone explain the basics to me or point me to an article or website where I can read more about it? Any good beginner programs? Ideas on how much to do? Descriptions of the different moves?

Thanks in advance!

As far as I know, most people who use plyometrics do them to improve athletic, especially jumping, ability. Basically, they’re explosive, mostly unweighted movements that should be done when fresh so as to not overly fatigue the nervous system.

Search for plyometrics on google, maybe check out Kelly Bagget’s “Vertical Jump Bible”. Also, here’s an okay site to start looking for exercises: www.exrx.net/Lists/PowerExercises.html

Plyo is doing power movements. “Plyo” is just a nice friendly way of saying you will be doing power movements. Basically the premise is to use (recruit) as many muscle receptors as physically possible in a split second. As was already said, this is extremely beneficial to an athlete. How it helps you?

The more muscle you can recruit the more calories can be burned… the more muscle can be built to increase metabolism. Also, the more strength and neuro muscular efficiency you will have (which is a good bonus). “Plyo” movements for someone just starting should come from basic movements. If you understand a good squat (not to be confused with olympic style squatting) try to do jumping squats. If you can do pushups properly…try clapping pushups. If you can do lunges properly, try jumping lunges.

Usually women go to “step class” for plyo experience. I highly recommend you get the basic movements down and understand how to incorporate power into your training. I believe if you look up coach davies workouts at T-Nation…you will see some good examples.

Goodluck

A point of clarification: Plyo (Plio) metrics actually refers to eccentric muscle action.

He is right however when stating that by doing traditional plyo’s, one can recruit more M.U.'s than most other types of weight training.

How it helps for fat loss however I am not sure. Since traditional plyo training is VERY stressful, it should be performed seldomly, and with complete rest within the training week. I can’t see it having any type of direct effect on fat loss. Now, if you do other type of repetitive jump training, I am sure it may have the same effect as a weightlifting workout with the same intensity in that it may increase oxygen consumption post workout leading to a possible fat loss. In other words, it could probably just be viewed as another stimulus than weighttraining for fat loss. I WOULD NOT try to do traditional plyo’s for a “cardio” workout (repetitive reps for a long time) as well I would still limit the regular jump training. If you are a woman, be especially careful with this type of training, because if your leg strength is not up to par, you are more susceptable to knee injuies.

Hope that helps,

Pat

[quote]gustojack wrote:
Plyo is doing power movements. “Plyo” is just a nice friendly way of saying you will be doing power movements. Basically the premise is to use (recruit) as many muscle receptors as physically possible in a split second. As was already said, this is extremely beneficial to an athlete. How it helps you?

The more muscle you can recruit the more calories can be burned… the more muscle can be built to increase metabolism. Also, the more strength and neuro muscular efficiency you will have (which is a good bonus). “Plyo” movements for someone just starting should come from basic movements. If you understand a good squat (not to be confused with olympic style squatting) try to do jumping squats. If you can do pushups properly…try clapping pushups. If you can do lunges properly, try jumping lunges.

Usually women go to “step class” for plyo experience. I highly recommend you get the basic movements down and understand how to incorporate power into your training. I believe if you look up coach davies workouts at T-Nation…you will see some good examples.

Goodluck [/quote]

Another point to add;
One of the best points from any article I have read on here that has stuck with me was from Chad Waterbury in the old article “What we’ve learned”. In it he states:

“Before performing any exercise always ask yourself, “What is the purpose
of this exercise; is there a better exercise I could be doing?””

I think this can apply to programming in general. If you are trying to lean out ask yourself: “What is the purpose of plyo’s for leaning out? Is there a better method I could be using?”

I am in no way knocking you, as by asking you are trying to achieve the first part of the statement above, but IMO, there are probably more effcient means you can use to lean out.

Cheers and good luck,
Pat

Thanks for the replies! I’m a little surprised, I know I have read about fitness and figure competitors incorporating plyo into their workouts. I understand about keeping it simple and that’s definitely where I’m at right now :slight_smile: I just thought I’d read up on it to consider trying further down the road. I could also use some help with my quickness and agility now that my ice hockey season just started again.

I’ll check out the resources mentioned. Thanks again!

Plyometric protocols are for developing explosive strength and are not ideal for fat loss.

I do plyometric lunges all the time…and they are super painfull in a good way! You basicaly “jump” from lunging on one leg to the other. Lunge with the left leg forward then jump and land with the right leg forward lunge. Each time push off with the front leg. Try varying your speed start slow then speed up. You will really feel a burn in your quad and butt!!! Good luck and have fun

~NH