T Nation

Plateau on Deadlift


#1

Ive been seriously powerlifting training now for around 2 years (not long at all i know) and during that time ive made alot of great progress on my deadlift through fairly simple training programmes mostly consisting of progressive resistance off the floor with free weight,some top end rack work and some work standing on blocks. My main issue is at lockout in that i will pull weights very fast off the floor but then totally grind to a halt a few inches from lockout

no matter what i try by the way of technique adjustment,top end strength work and block work and speed pulls to increase speed of floor hoping for carry over my deadlift doesnt really moved at all and hasnt in the past 8 months. i am just wondering if anyone can spot any major flaws in my technique or can suggest a training method or piece of equipment such as bands (which i do have acess to) that might help me smash this. or even if my frame and leverages would be better suited to sumo?

that is me at my most recent meet on my second attempt. unfortunatley i dont have a video of my 3rd which was 322.5 failed a few inches from lockout.


#2

Generally the closer your feet are together the more drive you get off the floor but the harder it's going to be to push your hips through at the top(hence the failing at lockout). It seems like your stance is pretty tight, hips, low back and glutes are probably gonna need the most strengthening without modifying your stance. Deads off blocks, GHR's, RDL's would probably be my focus in your position. You could also try pushing your feet out an inch or two on each side, it'll take a while to adjust and you'll lose speed off the floor but make it easier to lock out. Just my 2c.


#3

Have you considered upper back work? Usually, strengthening the upper back and hamstrings solves this problem.


#4

I have the same issue with my conventional deadlift. I found using a semi-sumo took better advantage of my strengths. Breaking the ground was too difficult and hard on my SI joint and hip flexors for me with full sumo but I do use it as supplementary work.

Have you tried speed work with bands and/or chains with your pulls?


#5

I have the same issue with my conventional deadlift. I found using a semi-sumo took better advantage of my strengths. Breaking the ground was too difficult and hard on my SI joint and hip flexors for me with full sumo but I do use it as supplementary work.

Have you tried speed work with bands and/or chains with your pulls?


#6

speed pulls with chains and speed pulls from blocks helped my top end. so did pulling against bands for hard triples and holding the weight at lockout for a few seconds. but you pull almost 200lbs more than me, so your mileage may vary.


#7

What about taking a break from DLs for maybe a couple of weeks? In the meantime, you can focus on working on strengthening your lats, do shit loads of pullthroughs, 1 arm row and bent over row etc...


#8

There's a lot of good advice there. However, I would say a 322.5 dead is already pretty solid and that you know what you're doing. That isn't to say that you can't keep moving it up. It will likely be in smaller increments than you are used to. I thought it was a beautiful pull. Just keep doing what you're doing and let time help you out.


#9

Thanks , alot of usefull feedback there especially the point about closer feet having a negative affect on top end strength, ill look more into that and its interesting because the close feet is only a farely recent addition to my deadlift as i used to adopt an almost "semi sumo" stance.


#10

I used to do "semi-sumo," too. I was red-lighted in competition for it, so I switched to a much more narrow position... leading to a very fast and clean pull off the floor and a slightly tougher lock-out.

I'm inclined to agree with Ouroborus here. That was a magnificent pull. The lock-out was a little sloppy, but not terrible. I'd also agree with adding in some more upper back work, though. I think the issue with that lock-out was your upper back not staying tight enough and being slightly hunched forward.. so your hips had to sidle underneath your shoulders and THEN complete the lock-out. I don't know if that makes much sense. But basically, it looks like if your back had stayed tight, the weight would've been supported by your hips a lot sooner and thus had a more "powerful" lock-out.

Maybe some partials would help, too, but it sounds like you're already doing that. Overall, I wouldn't worry too much. Progress slows as we do this longer and longer.


#11

Red-lighted for using a semi-sumo stance? Are you sure you didn't hitch or ramp? Otherwise, those were terrible judges.


#12

It was because they didn't think I was capable of locking my hips out with my legs that wide and still gripping outside of them.


#13

Gotcha.


#14

I have the same problem as you.... as you can see...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Sej9KCzNN-I&feature=share


#15

Problem solved... my advice to you is Rows... Rows... Rows...


#16

Along with extra upper back work, id suggest pulling off blocks with bands. Should get you along.


#17

Thanks Khalid good to see somone else overcoming the exact same problem ,great lifting aswell!


#18

A 672 deadlift is pretty solid imo. Maybe the weight was to much? We can beat ourselves up by wondering why we miss.

These things have worked for me. : against bands, pulling heavy I mean. for a ME exercise. Deficits. Pulling more. Josh Bryant has me pulling more than I ever did. But it was first reps and linear periodization for 300 to 500. Then Westside and bands done heavy from 500 to 585. Now it's been back to pulling more.


#19

Thanks Khalid good to see somone else overcoming the exact same problem ,great lifting aswell!


#20

And I've been doing rows more also as Khalid said.