T Nation

Plateau Buster- Swing Handle


#1


Have any of you guys heard of/used this product? With the recent increased interest in kettlebell swings for strength and conditioning on this site, I figured a few of you may have a new heavy bell on their wish list. For the price and the fact that you can load it with any olympic or standard plates you have, it's a clear winner over traditional kettlebells IMHO. I've actually loaded mine with over 400 lbs. with quit a bit of room to spare.


#2

[quote]Legionary wrote:
Have any of you guys heard of/used this product? With the recent increased interest in kettlebell swings for strength and conditioning on this site, I figured a few of you may have a new heavy bell on their wish list. For the price and the fact that you can load it with any olympic or standard plates you have, it’s a clear winner over traditional kettlebells IMHO. I’ve actually loaded mine with over 400 lbs. with quit a bit of room to spare.[/quote]

Who is the MFG. ?


#3

My former olympic lifting coahc Pierre Roy used it a lot back before kettlebells made their modern return. He used it mostly when lifters couldnt physically do the olympic lifts. It keps their posterior chain strength up. I personally find it cumbersome even if you use smaller plates. But it works. Its not magic though. And it will only help you bust through a plateau if:

  1. You are not good at utilizing the stretch reflex in lower body movements. As such it will make you stronger in those lifts (and improve sprinting and jumping) in a fairly sort time by improving your capacity to use the stretch reflex (require lower reps with max speed under fairly heavy loads)

  2. You have a very low work capacity/conditioning level which prevents you from recovery fast between strength sets in your workouts (require multiple sets of moderate reps)

  3. Have fat to lose and don’t want to do strength-robbing cardio (require higher reps)


#4

davedraper.com/pmwiki/pmwiki.php?n=PmWiki.T-Handle

Now I built mine using 1 inch pipe all for under $25.Works great for heavy hinges.
I have gone over 200lbs for reps with this.


#5

[quote]BlueCollarTr8n wrote:

[quote]Legionary wrote:
Have any of you guys heard of/used this product? With the recent increased interest in kettlebell swings for strength and conditioning on this site, I figured a few of you may have a new heavy bell on their wish list. For the price and the fact that you can load it with any olympic or standard plates you have, it’s a clear winner over traditional kettlebells IMHO. I’ve actually loaded mine with over 400 lbs. with quit a bit of room to spare.[/quote]

Who is the MFG. ? [/quote]

Stronger Grip. They have 3 variations of the swing handle I believe.


#6

[quote]Christian Thibaudeau wrote:
My former olympic lifting coahc Pierre Roy used it a lot back before kettlebells made their modern return. He used it mostly when lifters couldnt physically do the olympic lifts. It keps their posterior chain strength up. I personally find it cumbersome even if you use smaller plates. But it works. Its not magic though. And it will only help you bust through a plateau if:

  1. You are not good at utilizing the stretch reflex in lower body movements. As such it will make you stronger in those lifts (and improve sprinting and jumping) in a fairly sort time by improving your capacity to use the stretch reflex (require lower reps with max speed under fairly heavy loads)

  2. You have a very low work capacity/conditioning level which prevents you from recovery fast between strength sets in your workouts (require multiple sets of moderate reps)

  3. Have fat to lose and don’t want to do strength-robbing cardio (require higher reps)

[/quote]

CT, I think the designation “Plateau Buster” is more of a marketing term than anything and agree that it isn’t a magic piece of equipment, just another tool in the toolbox. For those of us who don’t train in a performance oriented gym with access to heavy kettlebells, the $150 price tag may be a better investment than multiple heavy bells.

For 1) and 3), what rep/set ranges would you recommend, and what loads would be appropriate for the average trainee?